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Yellowtieguy

5/1/18 - Special Guest: Emma G

Thanks to Emma G for hanging out with us in the studio this week!  We discovered her great music and her love of hugs!  :-)

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. ***"Knock Me Down" by Unsullied (Hard Rock, Punk)

  2. "Tumbling" by Emma G (Pop, Pop-Rock)

  3. "Go Down" by Eli Lev (Indie, Southern Rock)

  4. ***"So Down" by Mike Hauser (Pop, Modern-Crooner)

  5. "Anthem" by Yellowtieguy (Rock, Indie)

***The first time we've played this artist for you on the show, & a new artist profile added to our DC Artist Database!  There's new artists every week!

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


ANNOUNCEMENTS

FUNK PARADE IS TRYING WRIST BANDS THIS YEAR
For the first time, Funk Parade is announcing an General Festival Pass and Wristband ($10) to provide priority entrance into selected evening music venues.  Additionally we will be hosting our first ever Featured Showcase at the Historic Lincoln Theatre ($15-20) featuring Ari Lennox, Mannywellz and more.

MUSIC FEST WRISTBAND PASS
Ten dollars gets purchasers a FunkPowered General Festival Wristband, which will provide priority entry into the  the festival’s key evening music venues: Tropicalia, DC9, Ben’s Next Door, Franklin Hall, Signature Cuts & Shaves, Sollys, Velvet Lounge, Archipelago, Flash, Local 16, Sotto, Duffy’s, Marvin, Shaw Tavern, Exiles Bar, Bin 1301, Busboys & Poets, Songbyrd Music House (Late Night) and U Street Music Hall (Late Night).

The $10 wristband system is part of an effort to create a more sustainable future for Funk Parade, with a model that can continue to pay artists fairly to be a part of the festival.

HOW TO GET YOURS
Funk Parade has partnered with Eventbrite to sell the passes. To buy yours, Click HERE. They will also be available the day of the event at the Funk Parade Volunteer Tents at the Main Stage and in front of the Lincoln Theater, during the day fair on Saturday May 12 from 1:00pm - 7:00pm

HOW IT WORKS
To pick up your wristband, present your Eventbrite receipt at the Funk Parade Volunteer Tents at the Main Stage or the Lincoln Theater, or go to any of the participating venues in the evening starting at 7:00pm.


NEW MUSIC RELEASES

Our 2018 New Releases by DC Artists’ Spotify Playlist:
https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/7kbMQzbrQPisoJq5A76V3k


NEW VIDEOS

Our ‘DC Artists Official Music Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70kU0_uB-sdviWajkbzi2Akr


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Here’s just a few highlights for the coming week, be sure to check out the calendar for the full list of all the upcoming shows!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Fri May 4
Of Tomorrow @ 9:30 Club (Funk, RIYL Weather Report)
The Coolots @ Capital Fringe (Rock, RIYL Rage Against The Machine)

Sat May 5
Chris Cassaday & Surprise Attack @ Courthaus Social for 3 Year Anniversary Festival (Folk, Jam Band, RIYL Dave Matthews or Sublime)
Paperhaus @ Milkboy Arthouse (Indie, RIYL Radiohead)

Sun May 6
Feelfree @ Boomerang Boat Pirate Ship (Reggae, RIYL Steely Dan)
Zen Warship @ Bossa Bistro (Funk, RIYL Red Hot Chili Peppers)

Wed May 9
Kid Brother & Lavendar @ Gypsy Sally’s (Indie & Rock, RIYL The 1975 or Modest Mouse)

Thurs May 10
Jack Gregori @ Pearl Street Warehouse (Country, RIYL Waylon Jennings)


Patreon

Do you like what we're doing?  Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **Music 4 The Revolution (Abu Jibran)**


We're Looking For Sponsors

We're looking for local businesses to sponsor us!  Know One?  Would you introduce us to them?



Emma G

Video - Bio - Links - Transcript

Emma G's Bio:

Emma G DC Music Rocks

A unique combination of Adele, Pink, Tracy Chapman and Alanis Morrissette; singer/songwriter Emma G describes her sound as soul pop/rock. With gutsy vocals and inspiring lyrics, Emma G's melodies hammer home the messages of empowerment, love and respect.

Links:
Website
Patreon
Bandcamp
Instagram
Twitter
Facebook

Live at The Mint.jpg
Emma G Taking Flight.jpg

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:   Now, let me give you a proper introduction here. So, on DCmusicrocks.com, we are shining a spotlight on the great songs, artists, and incredible people behind the DC region's music scene. Emma G is a unique combination of Adele, Pink, Tracy Chapman, and Alanis Morrissette. She talked about it earlier, it's that amazing combination of all those people. It's like all my favorite people wrapped into one, and then Emma G was born. Which is- No wonder I love you so much.

Emma G:   Aw, man.

Brian:   It's one of those things. She's a singer, songwriter out of- What part of the city are you?

Emma G:   I'm originally from New Zealand, obviously.

Brian:   Yeah.

Emma G:   But I now call Brightwood my home.

[00:00:36]

Brian:   Brightwood? Which part?

Emma G:   Which nobody knows where that is.

Brian:   Yeah, where is Brightwood?

Emma G:   It's not Brentwood. It's not ... 'cause I'm...

Brian:   Thanks for clarifying. Okay.

Emma G:   So I'm a mile from Takoma.

Brian:   I got it. Okay. So up in the northeast, general. [crosstalk 00:00:48]

Emma G:   North west. North west.

Brian:   Technically you're right. It's northwest.

Emma G:   Yeah, it's northwest.

Brian:   It's the west of the capitol. So northwest, but up near Takoma and that area. I got it. She described her sound as a soul/pop/rock. And with gutsy vocals and inspiring lyrics, Emma G's melodies hammer home the messages of empowerment, love ,and respect. And thanks for being here.

Emma G:   Thanks.

Brian:   I've been a fan for well over a year now, so it's a treat to actually get to share you here on the show with.

Emma G:   It's funny because I feel like we've been cyber stalking one another for the last year.

Brian:   This is true.

Emma G:   I'm like ... I now know your face. This is exciting!

Brian:   That's right. I was just gonna say we just met for the first time today in person. But otherwise, yeah.

Emma G:   I have to say though, thank you for the hug.

Brian:   Of course.

Emma G:   And I'm so glad that you knew that I like hugs.

Brian:   I was gonna say if you didn't know by the way ... Talk to people about hugs. You give hugs at metros. Talk about the hug thing.

Emma G:   I am the hug dealer. Let's be real for a minute.

Brian:   The hug dealer? Some people are drug dealers, you're a hug dealer? Oh my God.

Emma G:   Endorphins make you happy

Brian:   This is like PG radio version of what a drug dealer is. Oh well the edited version, we'll call it a hug dealer.

Emma G:   No seriously. I mean The Washingtonian magazine, when they named me as one of the best of DC last year, they made mention of me giving hugs daily. And it's true. I don't know if it's because I'm from New Zealand or I'm just some hippy chick or what. For me, music is all about connection, right? And what better way to manifest that connection than through a high five or a hug, something to just be like, hey, I'm a real person, you're a real person, we're enjoying this moment together. Let's hug it out, bro.

Brian:   Hug it out. So next time you see Emma, don't be shy. Hug it out. Oh my God, I feel like that's almost like a hashtag or you should wear that as a T-shirt.

Emma G:   Hug it out, bro?

Brian:   Don't be shy, hug it out. Or hug it out, bro, something. That would be so good.

Emma G:   Oh my God, yes.

Brian:   So you play around. You said you do this full time, so talk about the places that you play, or where will they see you around time?

Emma G:   Before I moved here, I discovered Amanda Palmer, who is originally from Boston. And she made a career for herself as a street performer, we call it busking in New Zealand.

Brian:   Busking. Got it. I've heard that term.

Emma G:   Not bussing. I don't waitress. Busking.

Brian:   No, no, no. Busking with a k. B-u-s-k. Busking.

Emma G:   It's a very gendered term.

Brian:   For those persons who don't know, busking means you're playing outside with a hat out or at a metro stop or different places around and busking.

Emma G:   So I moved here in November 2015 and just was like stuff it, I'm gonna try my hand at busking. And that's how I've managed to do everything that I've done. I've met some amazing humans, including my partner. We met while I was busking.

Brian:   Really?

Emma G:   Yep, 'cause that's romantic.

Brian:   Yeah, there's nothing like playing outside at whatever time in the morning that was  ... there you go, cute girl playing music.

Emma G:   Especially because everywhere in the western world and in America at the moment that seems, nobody likes mornings, right? And so, I'm a Crossfitter, so I'm used to getting up super early and working out, but now instead of working out super early, I just go and sing and hopefully make people's days start better, and it's super fun!

Brian:   Do you have hours, or certain stops? What's that like?

Emma G:   Yeah, so I have a certain rotation that I try and keep up unless it's raining or unless somebody... Every now and then, you get somebody who isn't aware of my schedule that comes in, and that's cool. We're all about community, we're all about sharing the love, and what not, but generally speaking, Tuesdays I'm at Federal Triangle metro station, Wednesdays I'm at Foggy Bottom GWU Hospital, Thursdays L'Enfant Plaza, Fridays at Farragut North, and then Saturdays, I'm sometimes at the Silver Spring Market. And I do other [inaudible 00:04:56] markets as well.

Brian:   Yeah! And that's mornings? Or evenings? Or rush hours? Anytime?

Emma G:   6:30 in the morning, darling.

Brian:   6:30?

Emma G:   6:30 in the morning.

Brian:   Every morning?

Emma G:   Every morning.

Brian:   God, Emma I am so impressed with the dedication here. Holy smokes.

Emma G:   It makes for a really fun evening night life. I'm like, right! Ten o'clock-bedtime!

Brian:   Time to go to bed. I gotta work in the morning. Yep. Absolutely. Oh god, that's funny.

Emma G:   Such a rockstar.

Brian:   Yeah, you are. Oh, my god. Which is evidenced by the album and all the other stuff you have going on.

Emma G:   And I wish I drank coffee. Legitimately, I wish that I could use that as a vice to keep me awake. But no, I'm just a really big fan of nana naps.

Brian:   Nano naps?

Emma G:   Nana naps. In New Zealand, we call grandmas "nanas."

Brian:   Oh, I see.

Emma G:   Is that not an American thing? Nobody knows?

Brian:   No, I haven't heard that. But say more! So a nana nap means...

Emma G:   A nana nap is like a quick power nap.

Brian:   That's where nana falls asleep and her chin drops to her chest for five minutes and then she wakes back up

Emma G:   And starts drooling, and it's really awkward.

Brian:   Yeah? Okay. Oh, my god. One day, you should livestream your nana nap. I don't know.

Emma G:   I don't think that that is safe.

Brian:   No, no, no. That's a terrible idea. Nevermind. Terrible idea.

Emma G:   Oh goodness.

Brian:   Oh, that's funny. Speaking of this, talk about what's a funny or memorable moment that comes to mind when you think about the busking that you were doing. What comes to mind when you think about that?

Emma G:   A funny moment?

Brian:   Yeah.

Emma G:   I don't really, I can't think of any funny moments 'cause every moment that I've had that's memorable has mostly been really just heartwarming. The most heartwarming moment I had was-I was singing all the time at Foggy Bottom on Wednesday mornings and then I was in Iowa for Christmas 'cause that's where my Norwegian family, I know, obviously I'm Norwegian.

Brian:   Obviously.

Emma G:   Obviously. My Norwegian family live in Iowa, so I was away for the Christmas holidays, and I came back and I tried out a different station one day an this woman came rushing up to me and handed me an envelope. And she said, "I've been looking for you everywhere!" And then she's like, "I've gotta go. Thank you. Bye." And I'm like sitting going, this is America, and she's given me an unmarked envelope. What do I do?

Brian:   And we've been talking about ISIS! Should I be worried? Okay.

Emma G:   ISIS? What? Okay. Anyways, so I opened the envelope and she'd given me a Starbucks gift card, which was lovely. But she had typed out this A4, sorry what do you call it? The standard legal, letter size page typed letter highlighting everything that I had given her over the last six months.

Brian:   Holy smokes.

Emma G:   She apparently survives on four or five hours of sleep a night. She works too much, she's got two children that she raises by herself. Her lights in her life that she highlighted were God, her children, and my music on Wednesday mornings.

Brian:   Wow.

Emma G:   And so I just kind of cried a little bit and then got a tattoo in her honor.

Brian:   Wow.

Emma G:   Part of this is for her, so yeah, that's my most memorable moment while busking.

Brian:   Wow. Gosh. That's amazing. I love that story.

Emma G:   Thank you.

Brian:   And what about, so now outside of busking and music, talk about you on the personal side. Hobbies? What do you do for fun?

Emma G:   I sleep when I can.

Brian:   Yep, okay.

Emma G:   It's important. Like I said, I do CrossFit. Health and well-being is really important to me. But I'm also really lucky that I'm in a relationship with somebody who is also self-employed, so we spend our days trying not to kill each other. No, I'm kidding.

Brian:   Well, if you're both at home. I understand.

Emma G:   Yeah, we work really hard throughout the day and swap notes and he's writing a book and doing all kinds of empowerment stuff, and I'm writing music and doing all kinds of empowerment stuff, so it aligns really well. We're planning a tour at the moment, and yeah, just kind of trying to balance social life and sunshine and Vitamin D with sleep and health/fitness and watching movies and trying to stay sane. Meditation's become a really big part of my life at the moment.

Brian:   Okay.

Emma G:   Cooking, gardening.

Brian:   Excellent.

Emma G:   I've discovered the love of gardening.

Brian:   Nice. How does that manifest itself? Does that mean you started with tomato plants? What does that actually mean?

Emma G:   No, we started with-I can't remember what they're called. We bought some trees and planted them in front of Mark's house. So we've just been slowly pecking away at making the house look pretty.

Brian:   That's awesome.

Emma G:   And getting really dirty while doing it.

Brian:   Absolutely. Oh, my god, getting dirty in the garden. Excellent.

Emma G:   It's frightening because at least in New Zealand, you don't have anything that can kill you. Here, you have snakes and you've got poisonous spiders. Part of me is like, it's okay, I can do this barehanded or whatever, and them I'm like, oh, there's things that can kill me.

Brian:   Come bite me. Yeah. Oh my god.

Emma G:   There's that.

Brian:   That would be a funny thing. One of my favorite questions to ask is if you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be?

Emma G:   Floss.

Brian:   Say more on that. Where does that come from?

Emma G:   Because I'm in the middle of getting...In America, it would have cost me fifteen thousand dollars to get my teeth fixed. I'm not going through that system. I'm actually going to Canada back and forth. It's cheaper. A lot cheaper.

Brian:   To get dentist stuff done.

Emma G:   Yeah. So I've had two root canals and I've had to get fourteen fillings.

Brian:   And if you would have flossed, that could have been avoided.

Emma G:   I feel like that's probably not the whole solution, but I feel like it probably contributes a lot.

Brian:   Been a big part of it.

Emma G:   So if we're on that token, then I guess just don't procrastinate stuff.

Brian:   Ah, I see.

Emma G:   If you're having an issue. That's life advice for anything.

Brian:   That's true.

Emma G:   Musical, business. Don't procrastinate.

Brian:   Yep.

Emma G:   It's not going to go away.

Brian:   Stay on top of it.

Emma G:   Just do it.

Brian:   There was that song, god, years ago. Fifteen, twenty years ago that was like-if you could offer one piece of advice, wear sunscreen. And I feel like you just hit us with another one of those. Floss!

Emma G:   There was a fantastic remix of that speech. Wear sunscreen. Who was that? Yeah. It's on YouTube, though. It's beautiful.

Brian:   There you go.

Emma G:   It's like this Moby-esque kind of speech online. Wearing sunscreen and life advice.

Brian:   Yeah. Absolutely.

Emma G:   Sorry.

Brian:   God, it was a graduation class. I remember. I'm going to have to go back and listen to it now that we're talking about it.

Emma G:   Yes. Wear sunscreen.

Brian:   Yep.

Emma G:   And floss.

Brian:   That's a good one.

11/14/17 - Special Guest: Data Recovery Project

Thanks to, Christopher and Daniel of Data Recovery Project, for hanging out with us in the studio this week!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcherPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM TODAY'S SHOW

MUSIC

  1. November 8, 2016, by Two Dragons and a Cheetah (Rock, Alt Rock)
  2. We're Coming For You, by Data Recovery Project (Techno)
  3. Dawn, by Rorie (Pop, Singer-songwriter)
  4. The Record, by Doublemotorcycle (Hard Rock, Pop)
  5. Selfless and Undyed,by Milo in the Doldrums (Rock, Indie Rock)
  6. Good Day, by Yellowtieguy (Rock, Indie Rock)

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-

ANNOUNCEMENTS

DANCING IN A CAR VIDEO CONTEST
https://www.facebook.com/dcmusicrocks/posts/1996864693891726

!!Submission Deadline 11/25!!
Shoutout to Chip Py for the video submitted dancing to Rare Essence in his car!  Love it!

Car Dance Party playlist link:  https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/4j84nMTEEXUB0tWIQu83Yn

****************

SHIRTS - Just released Long Sleeve Shirts as well!  DC Music Rocks T-shirt’s are up on our website and available through Amazon, they make a great gift idea for your musician friends and family for the holidays!  Men’s, Women’s, and Youth sizes available for short sleeves!

http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/shirts

NEW RELEASES

********Music:********
Two Dragons and A Cheetah - November 8, 2016 (Single)
Oddisee - Beneath The Surface (Album)

Our ‘2017 New Releases by DC Artists’ Spotify Playlist:
https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/24KrZD9KlUE2yC3eT2oBUI

 

********Video:********
Two Dragons and A Cheetah - November 8, 2016
"November 8, 2016," a protest song inspired by band member Maryjo Mattea's emotions and experiences following the election, is a cathartic expression of anger as well as a call to action. It reflects the somber mood that blanketed the DC area in the days and weeks following election night and gives voice to the plights of the oppressed. The song is accompanied by a powerful video produced and directed by Stephanie Sapienza and shot by Casey McAdams.
https://youtube.com/watch?v=YGjAgRlZ9U8

The Duskwhales - Slow Down, Jerusalem
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ru2G3eDtgHc

Our ‘DC Artists Official Music Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70kU0_uB-sdviWajkbzi2Akr

 

THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Nov 17 Fri
The Sidleys @ Villain & Saint in Bethesda MD
Vim & Vigor @ World of Beer in Ashburn, VA
Turtle Recall @ The Ugly Mug in Eastern Market in SE DC

Nov 18 Sat
By & By and Jonny Grave at Solly’s Tavern on U St in DC
Pebble To Pearl at The Hamilton by Metro Center in NW DC

Nov 19 Sun
Humble Fire at The Blact Cat on 14th St in NW DC

Nov 22 Wed
Hayley Fahey & Higher Education at Looney’s in College Park MD


Patreon

Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
--Daniel Warren Hill  --David Mohl



Data Recovery Project

VIDEO - BIO - LINKS - TRANSCRIPT

BIO:

data recovery project

Data Recovery Project is a Synth/Pop Electronic band that explores dark subject matter in a way that incorporates dance beats. Data Recovery Project pays homage to a variety of genres included in electronic music and its sub-genres, but also plays on the inner explorations of the subject matter.

Data Recovery Project consists of C.P. Kush, a DC songwriter and electronic music producer, and Daniel Warren Hill, producer and backing vocalist, and front man for Alternative Rock band YellowTieGuy.

Official Website URL: www.datarecoveryproject.com

Facebook URL:  https://www.facebook.com/datarecovprojct/

iTunes Link: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/apocalapse-ep/id1273903140

Spotify Link: https://open.spotify.com/artist/27aC4AOTOGtXS2zZ1SHndU

Other Links: Twitter: @DataRecovProjct

data recovery project

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:     On DC Music Rocks, we're shining a spotlight on the great songs, artists, and incredible people behind the DC region's local music scene.

     Now, Data Recovery Project is a synth-pop-electronic band that explores dark subject matter in a way that incorporates dance beats. Data Recovery Project pays homage to a variety of genres, including the electronic music and its sub-genres, but also plays on the inner explorations of the subject matter. It's music and topic together and you get Data Recovery Project.  Thanks for being here, guys.

Christopher:     Thank you. It's good to be here.

Brian:     This is a treat.   Now, talk about ... For those, how did the band come together and where did Data Recovery Project come from?

Christopher:     Well-

Daniel:     Christopher-

Christopher:     How to start it? Well, anyone who's familiar with the KLF ... Anyone who's familiar with the KLF, they had this great song called "Justified Mansion" in the '90s.

Brian:     Oh, okay.

Christopher:     They wrote a book that you can pay a lot of money for, that I paid a lot of money for. They wrote this book called "How to Have a Number One Single." I bought it-

Brian:     Nice.

Christopher:     Because I love that song so much. I thought, "God, I wonder if this really works."

 One of the first things about having a number one single, you have to rent studio time and get somebody in there who will give you a bassline. This is literally how it all starts. I actually-

Brian:     Really?

Christopher:     I did that, kind of.

Brian:     Okay.

Christopher:     Here, in DC. I started working with somebody else until I ran into Daniel. Then I had my beats and I had my machines. I asked Daniel to come along and help with not just the songwriting and the vocals but also the production.

Brian:     Sure.

Christopher:     So that DRP could get going.

Daniel:     Christopher is just an excellent storyteller, songwriter. If you're following along with it, he really weaves the dark subject matter into really upbeat, dance-y grooves. One of the things that I really loved about working with it is, coming from a background where there's more traditional song structures, like verse, and chorus, and bridge, he incorporates all of those elements.

      You're not just listening to the same kick, snare, kick, snare, like, "Here's some spacey effects to make you follow a simple note," you know? The song actually does evolve and progress and want to take you somewhere, lyrically, in addition to all of these really cool space effects, you know?

Brian:     Wow.

Daniel:     That's one of the things I like the most.

Brian:     I love the way that it comes together.

Christopher:     We are heavily invested in special effects because, if we're being honest ... A lot of songwriters will have that core ... You know, they'll have that guitar and they'll have that core song.

Brian:     Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Christopher:     For me, the produce music and all those special treat ear candy things are, for a music fan, that's as much a part of the show.

Brian:     Yeah.

Christopher:     To the point that when I see a band live and they don't take care of their little production sound effects, that drives me crazy.

      Data Recovery Project sounds big and it has a lot of that going on, a lot of those sounds. We try to make it a maximalist kind of music, rather than a thin, electronic music.

Daniel:     It's definitely very produced and there is a lot of stuff going on. It's the kind of song where, if you think of your favorite artist and you've heard the song a million times, and this time you're using a new pair of headphones, and you hear something in the background that you've never heard before, and you've heard the song 100, 1,000 times.

Brian:     Wow.

Daniel:     That's definitely what will happen, the longer that you listen to Data Recovery Project stuff. You'll just hear this little trill somewhere or a different sound effect that came out of nowhere. It'll just surprise you.

Brian:     Where does the name come from?

Christopher:     The name came from

Daniel:     It was meant to troll companies, right? True story.

Christopher:     Yeah, we thought it would be a great search engine. We thought those were the people who would like us.   You know, it comes from-

Brian:     How's that doing? Is that working for you?

Christopher:     We don't know, but you certainly get a lot of things when you type it in the internet.

Brian:     Absolutely.

Christopher:     Some of the stuff that it's built around ... You know, in electronic music, there was this time of high-energy music, which really had these basslines that were ... They used to be done with octaves. Anyway, they were these basslines that were awesome, and they were loud, and they were electronic.

     Part of what we were doing was looking back. When we started, I thought we might do a whole lot of covers. It turns out we had stuff to say about what's going on now.

Brian:     Yeah, mm-hmm (affirmative).

Christopher:     I don't know what to say. We're sort of looking backwards but then we're sort of futuristic. We're just happy that we're finding a place where we can do this. We don't quite fit into a pre-cut genre.

Brian:     In the name, you just were inspired by?

Christopher:     It was sort of talking about the electronic nature, and that we were going to be reaching back.

Brian:     Okay, I see.

Christopher:     Then the subject matter, which Daniel said, we wanted to signal that we weren't going to do all of our songs about, you know, getting lucky on the dance floor. All those times, we're going to be on the dance floor, but we wanted to go wider.

Brian:     Right.

Christopher:     We just wanted to have something that evoked the subject matter would go all over the place, you know?

Brian:     That's cool. I love it. Fantastic.   What part of the region are you guys? The DC region?

Christopher:     I am from DC, northwest DC.

Brian:     Oh, I just realized, you said, "I." Introduce yourself too.

Christopher:     Oh.

Brian:     Who are you? They can only hear you if they're listening.

Christopher:     I am Christopher with Data Recovery Project.

Brian:     Yeah.

Christopher:     Daniel to my left.

Daniel:     Hi, Christopher to my right.

Christopher:     Daniel's from?

Daniel:     I'm in Waldorf, Maryland.

Brian:     Fantastic.

Daniel:     Which is part of our live tremors joke bit, actually.

Christopher:     Yes.

Brian:     You're from? Say it again. You're from which part?

Christopher:     I'm from northwest Washington DC.

Brian:     From the northwest DC. Fantastic.   Now, you brought up the live tremors, so let's talk about that too.

Christopher:     Okay.

Brian:     What is that?

Christopher:     Well, music videos ... You know, three minutes of video sounds easy, but when DRP was starting, we did a couple music videos, but they were long, they were expensive, and there's great, great videos out there. We decided Daniel and I would do something faster and simpler. We released these live tremors videos. They're about 30 second comedy videos and they're little shorts of us breaking in, playing our first gigs, fighting in the studio. They're all based on true things.

Brian:     Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Daniel:     Not necessarily things that have actually occurred to us negatively, or anything. We're just taking some of those moments that everybody seems to have when they're a performer and they're out and about, trying to be performers.

Brian:     Nice.

Daniel:     You run into these similar kinds of scenarios over [crsstalk 00:07:06]

Brian:     It's a YouTube series? What is it?

Daniel:     Yeah.

Christopher:     It's a YouTube series.

Brian:     Awesome.

Christopher:     We just sent away our musical DNA and got it back from 23andMe.

Daniel:     The swab [crosstalk 00:07:17] your results.

Christopher:     We were able to see what our musical DNA was.

Brian:     Oh, fantastic.

Christopher:     Daniel, we discovered, had some Red Hot Chili Peppers, and he had some Oasis, and he had a lot of Good Charlotte.

Daniel:     Because I'm from Waldorf.

Christopher:     I had Erasure and Nine Inch Nails, of course, if you listen to the songs.

Brian:     Got it.

Christopher:     That was it, right?

Daniel:     Oh no, what was the other one?

Christopher:     I don't want to say it. You have to watch live tremors. It was too humiliating.

Brian:     You've got to check out live tremors to hear what that other piece of DNA is. I love it.

Daniel:     It's just a segment that goes on the Data Recovery Project YouTube channel. If you find the Data Recovery Project YouTube channel, you'll find the live tremors.

Brian:     See the live tremors videos, all right. In for a good laugh, I love it.

     Talk about you guys outside of music now. Hobbies on the side? What do you do in your personal time?

Christopher:     Well, in my personal time, I'm making music.

Brian:     Ah, fair. Yeah.

Christopher:     In the rest of my life, I divide my time between Washington, DC and Florida.

Brian:     Okay.

Christopher:     I kind of am traveling around. In a previous life, I owned a bookstore.

Brian:     Really?

Christopher:     I've done work in Washington, DC in government relations kind of stuff. Yeah, so-

Daniel:     Creative writing.

Christopher:     Oh, that's right. I've written some books. Yeah. All that's in the misty past. Now, I'm full on music. Actually, I came to music as a fan.

Brian:     Okay.

Christopher:     It was the most surprising thing when I discovered that we could write songs. I mean, that was such a shock.

Brian:     How long ago was that?

Christopher:     That was three years ago.

Brian:     Wow! All this came in the last three years?

Christopher:     Yeah. I couldn't play an instrument. Some people did ... Daniel ... Some people say I still can't, since it's all electronic.

Brian:     True.

Christopher:     Yeah, that was just loving the music and then hearing it slip away and wanting to hold on to some pieces of things that I liked. It's really been the last three years that I've learned how to do it. Now, I'm obsessed and wondering why I-

Daniel:     He's sold. He's in.

Christopher:     Didn't do this when I was like 12.

Brian:     That's amazing. I love that you found it.   Really cool.

 I've got time for one more question, and it's my favorite question to ask, which is if you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be?

Christopher:     To aspiring musicians?

Brian:     You get to answer however you'd like.

Christopher:     My piece of advice is ... My big thing is to have flavor. When I hear bands, there's bands that are trying to hear something that they think will be commercial and then do it, and do it correctly, and do it perfectly. That's not my thing. I love point of view and I love flavor. When I say flavor, I love an artist that has their own voice, that has their own way to sing, their own use of words. I think that really shows up. It's harder to get people on the dance floor when they don't know your songs, but it's much more lasting. My advice is to try your hardest to find out what your unique sound is. It's going to feel, in a way, like maybe that's not the commercially thing you could be doing but-

Brian:     Got it. Good stuff, guys.   One more time, for those folks who want to find out more about Data Recovery Project, where do they go?

Christopher:     They can go to DataRecoveryProject.com, they can like us on Facebook, they can follow us on Twitter and on Instagram.

Brian:     Do you have a favorite of those? Which one are you more active on?

Daniel:     Christopher's on Facebook.

Christopher:     I sort of do the Facebook thing, but you can find us on Spotify and iTunes.

Brian:     Of course.

Christopher:     We're releasing an EP every month.

Brian:     Yeah. That's right! Once a month.

Christopher:     Yeah, with our own remixes every month. We've got a new song to jam to.

Brian:     Nice.

Daniel:     Four or five tracks. There's an acoustic version, an instrumental version for "We Are Coming For You." We did a radio-friendly version and a sitting in your car, yelling out the window version.

Brian:     Hell yeah! I love it. A yelling out your window ... Yelling out your car window version. I feel like that was almost like a really funny DJ name is like, "This is the remix by the Yelling Out Your Car."

Daniel:     Right.

10/31/17 - Special Guests: Daniel & Taylor of The DC Music Rocks Team

Thanks to, Daniel Hill, the show Coordinator for DC Music Rocks & Taylor Thomas, DCMR's PR/Social Media/web content rock star, for hanging out with us in the studio this week!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might take time to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcherPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

FROM TODAY'S SHOW

MUSIC

  1. Brood (Another Line), by Yellowtieguy (Rock, Indie Rock)
  2. Arrows, by Brave Like Us (Indie, Rock)
  3. Intellectual Property, by Staycation (Funk/Rock)
  4. Apocalapse, by Data Recovery Project (Techno)
  5. Best Part of My Day, by Slow Creek (Folk,Indie Rock)
  6. She Keep Me High, by Beau Young Prince (Hip-Hop, R&B)
  7. Red Head Walking, by Root Deco (Rock, Blues Rock)

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Want to take a tour of NPR?  The tours are free and open to the public.  If you’re interested, here’s the link below!  
(FAQ: No, you can’t just attend a tiny desk concert, you’ll need to be the guest of someone who actually works there)
http://tours.npr.org/Home

Listeners we’re reaching out.  Have you heard about something DC Music Rocks could be involved in?  Interested in hosting a meetup to go see local musician’s shows?  Organizations that have similar missions to ours we could partner with?  We’d love to hear other ways you have that come to mind, send us a note, we’re looking for other ways to collaborate with the local music community.

Shoutout to Stephanie Mathias, featured on last week’s program, she Facebook live streamed listening to herself on the radio for the first time ever last week, and it was so cool for us to get to see that moment.  We loved it and are happy to share the link so you can watch the moment too:
https://www.facebook.com/stephaniemathiasmusic/posts/935605416596016

NEW RELEASES

Video:
Creedence Clearwater Revival - "Fortunate Son" - (Cover By His Dream Of Lions) - They made it like a music video, good stuff!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JpPm7iGiqd4

Our ‘DC Artists Official Music Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70kU0_uB-sdviWajkbzi2Akr

THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Just the one's we talked about on the show, which is just a taste.  Don't forget to visit the full calendar to see all the upcoming shows!

Nov 3 Fri
DC - Justin Jones & The Cowards Choir @ Pearl Street Warehouse by The Wharf, at the SW Waterfront
VA - Ken Wenzel Music @ Tavern 64 in Reston, VA
MD - Rare Essence @ Fast Eddies in Camp Springs, MD

Nov 4 Sat
DC - Sub-Radio @ Pearl Street Warehouse in the SW Waterfront
VA - Chris Cassaday @ Crafthouse in Arlington, VA
MD - Round About @ 7 Locks Brewing in North Bethesda, MD

Nov 8 Wed
19th Street Band @ Lahinch Tavern & Grill in Glen Echo, MD

Nov 9 Thu
Venn @ Black Cat in Washington, DC
Owen Danoff @ Jammin Java in Vienna, VA


https://www.patreon.com/dcmusicrocks
Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, cohost spots on the show, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!



Daniel Hill & Taylor Thomas

BIO - LINKS

DC Music Rocks Selfie
Daniel Hill Taylor Thomas DC Music Rocks

BIOS:

Daniel Hill and Taylor Thomas

Daniel Warren Hill:

Band/Artist Name: YellowTieGuy

Each current band member: First&Last name, nickname (if any) and instrument: Daniel Hill - guitar & vocals, Jason McKinney -guitar, Steve Syzbowski -drums, Jamie Rasmussen -bass

What part of the DC region is the artist tied to and how? Where is the artist's current home base if not DC? : Waldorf, MD

Atleast 3 interesting/entertaining facts about the band that are related to persons/places/things/events that happened in the Washington DC area. Give us fun stuff, not normal bio stuff!: Daniel's primary car is a 1994 Toyota Camry with 325,000+ miles...bought from another area musician,Bill Holter, guitarist for Vintage #18.

Jamie is also a nude art photographer with 66.1k followers on Instagram @randompantsfoto

YellowTieGuy once performed a festival in Lexington Park MD, where a live tornado touched down 10-15 minutes after finishing our set.

Anything else we should know, or you want to share?: Gosh...where do we begin!? Please do read the long bio on our website. We are actively involved in trying to revolutionize the DC, MD, VA music community. We are so grateful for all the support we've received and, there are so many great people that have contributed to us in so many ways, other talented performers we've had the pleasure of working with...We are spoiled and loving it, and we don't take it for granted!

Band/Artist Website (not Facebook): Www.yellowtieguy.us

About Taylor Thomas: 

Taylor has been involved in the media since she was in high school back in the good ol' state of Indiana! From on screen TV hosting a regional sports show on Fox Sports, to sideline reporting for the Indianapolis Colts and Indiana Pacers & nearly years in the TV Commercial sales - she's seen and heard it all. Taylor has since taken all of her knowledge of marketing, sales, & dealing with people with her to her current career in DC as a Real Estate Agent on the #1 selling team at Compass Real Estate - The Mandy & David Team. 

Three interesting facts: 

1) I also have the self-proclaimed "coolest dog in the DMV." Our boxer-bullmastif, Murphy, has the biggest personality and I often refer to her as my "furbaby."

2) If anyone knows how big the Indianapolis 500 in Indiana is you might be able to appreciate this one: I was crowned the 2012 Indianapolis 500 Festival Queen & got to give winner Dario Franchitti a smooch on the cheek in the famous "Winners Circle"

3) I work on a show that promotes all types of amazing singers & I too sing - but only in my car or when I'm in the kitchen cooking by myself LOL 

Instagram: @curls.pearlsandclosings

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/taylorjadams/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/taylor.adams.39108

Murphy!

Murphy!

9/5/17 - Special Guest: Singer-Songwriter, Matt Tarka

Thanks to Matt Tarka, Singer-Songwriter from Montgomery County, for coming by the studio this week!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might take time to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcherPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

FROM TODAY'S SHOW

MUSIC

  1. Battle Scars, by Laura Farrell (Indie, Folk)
  2. Very Little, by Matt Tarka (Rock)
  3. You and I, by The Sidleys (Rock/Soul)
  4.  Afraid of the Rain, by Yellowtieguy (Rock)
  5. Woman in Black, by Tomato Dodgers (Funk/Interstellar Funk)
  6. Bruises, by Bells and Hunters (Rock/ Blues Rock)

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-

ANNOUNCEMENTS

     Thank you so much for your love and support of the DC Music Rocks Festival, which happened on Saturday 9/2.  To see 100+ pictures and videos everyone took at the event, go on instagram and check out the hashtag #dcmusicrocks930.  Thank you so much to everyone for supporting and coming out to this event.  A BIG thank you to the bands, Christian Hunt of the Capital City Showcase for MCing the evening, Tara G of Logan Circle Events, Rachel Levitin, Taylor Thomas and her husband JD, the 9:30 Club team, and so many more, there’s just so many people that we’re grateful for which helped in the creation of this event!   

     DC Music Rocks was featured in the DCist’s Article “DC’s 9 Best Local Music Podcasts.  Also featured friends of ours such as Sean Russell who was last week’s featured guest and his podcast “The Circus Life”, another one of our favorites, “Hometown Sounds”, the guys from “chunky glasses” that we’re dying to meet, and so many others.  Hope you’ll check it out, and thank you so much to Julie Strupp and the DCist for the spotlight!  We’re grateful and honored!
http://dcist.com/2017/08/dcs_10_best_local_music_podcasts.php

NEW RELEASES

Music:
Allthebestkids - Confetti/Unafraid (2 Song Single)
Ms. Fridrich - Last Brick Laid (4 song EP)
Joshua Rich - Come On Over (14 Song Album)

Video:
Allthebestkids - Confetti
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DRB3J-fEVLw

Paperhaus - Nanana
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nUBai5Y8GIc

THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE 

Fri Sep 8
Black Masala @ Songbyrd Music House in Adams Morgan in NW DC
Lauren Calve @ Gypsy Sally’s in Georgetown in NW DC
Taylor Carson @ Jammin Java in Vienna, VA

Sat Sep 9
Nappy Riddem & Rare Essence @ 202 Arts & Music Festival on M St in SW DC

Sun Sep 10
Leo & Cygnus, Hayley Fahey Music @ Takoma Park Folk Festival near Silver Spring, MD
Den-Mate @ DC9 Nightclub by U St in NW DC

Mon Sep 11
FuzzQueen @ Black Cat near 14th & U in NW DC

Wed Sep 13
Lionize, Tomato Dodgers @ Black Cat near 14th & U in NW DC
Veronneau CD/Album Release Party @ Blues Alley in NW DC



Matt Tarka

VIDEO - BIO - LINKS - TRANSCRIPT

BIO:

Matt Tarka DC Music Rocks

Have you ever had a moment where you’ve realized that you were late to the party, that you’ve spent too much energy on trying to please the wrong people or you’ve been deceived by those closest to you? If the answer is yes then the rock-inflected folk music of DC-based artist Matt Tarka will speak directly to you. Weaving isolated moments of heartbreak and rejection into his songs he continues the traditions of artists such as Tom Petty, Wilco and Carole King.

These themes flow from his new EP, Vision Hazy - recorded at Low Watt Recording in Savannah, GA with Ted Comerford (Jukebox The Ghost, Jonas Sees in Color) at the production helm, and subsequently mixed by Mitch Easter (R.E.M, Pavement, Dinosaur Jr.) at The Fidelitorium in North Carolina. Taking his folk origins and unleashing them, with the help of the occasional guitar flourish or fluttering drumbeat, the record sees Tarka bolster his sound with a rockier element. Sonically it’s his most advanced creation to date.

The considered nature of the tracks belies the slightly chaotic nature of his creative process. Ideas are roughly written down on index cards, notebooks, on scraps of paper left under the bed in case of night-time inspiration, or recorded into a dictation machine. Out of these assorted thoughts come the lyrics, which then shape the sound of his music. Demos are recorded onto an old cassette recorder, giving them a timeless feel from the very outset, and order is finally formed from his disorderly ruminations.

It’s a process that has evolved since his debut in 2008, as Tarka continues to follow his muse. As he says himself, ‘don’t let anyone tell you what kind of music you should be making, or how you should be making it. There are enough outside distractions in the world. Be true to yourself.’ You can hear this mantra ringing out in his honest lyrics and heartfelt delivery.

In an intimate live setting Tarka’s music takes on a different lease of life, careening and questing further from his tight recordings. Having already played in Baltimore, Philadelphia, NYC and DC (anywhere with a barbeque joint nearby), with new shows coming up there’ll be plenty of chances to hear the songs of Vision Hazy performed live. You needn’t worry if you’re late in discovering the sounds of Matt Tarka …. Now’s the perfect chance to catch up! 

EPK: http://www.reverbnation.com/rpk/matttarka

Web: www.matttarkamusic.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/MattTarkaMusic

Twitter: @MattTarka
Instagram: @MattTarka

Matt Tarka DC Music Rocks
Matt Tarka 2.jpg

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:     On DC Music Rocks, we're shining a spotlight the great songs, and incredible people behind the DC region's local music scene. So Matt Tarka is an artist from Montgomery County. He describes his style as rock inflected folk, which we definitely heard in that track right there, for sure. He continues the tradition of artists such as Tom Petty, Wilco, and Carol King, by weaving isolated moments of heartbreak and rejection into his songs. And yet, he's a smiley, positive dude. He's sitting here with me. I first came across this guy because my Show coordinator, Daniel Hill, the yellow tie guy helps me put this together, and he and Matt know each other. He introduced me to Matt's music, and I've been a huge fan. So Matt, thanks for being here man.

Matt:     Yeah, thanks for talking to me.

Brian:     You're welcome. I'm glad we got that out of the way. So now tell us about you. When did music enter your life? How did that happen?

Matt:     Probably fourth grade. I started off playing alto sax in elementary school, and middle school band. Continued that track for about four or five years, just playing in elementary school and middle school band, and then later on I think ... What eventually happened was it was baseball season, and I was in early high school. A friend of mine to convince my mom and dad that I should join a band that he's starting right now, that it kind of looked like I could play bass. So without really any knowledge of what was going on, my friend Jeff decided to con my parents into buying four string Peavey Fury bass guitar. So I think that was really ... I always really enjoyed rock and roll music and stuff before that, but I think that really kind of solidified the deal.

Brian:     The four string bass sucked you in, huh?

Matt:     Sucked me in-

Brian:     That's amazing-

Matt:     [crosstalk 00:02:02] Peavey Basic 60 solid-state amp, that I just tormented my parents with for years [crosstalk 00:02:09]-

Brian:     It sounds like such fond memories that you and them both have, absolutely. Now Montgomery County, were you born and raised there? Or was that-

Matt:     No, I'm not originally from Montgomery County. I'm originally from Hershey, Pennsylvania.

Brian:     No way, Hershey Park, Pennsylvania?

Matt:     Hershey Park, yeah-

Brian:     That's what you're talking about, okay.

Matt:     So I had an amusement park and a chocolate factory in my backyard. It was a charmed life.

Brian:     Every kid's dream.

Matt:     Yeah-

Brian:     Right there-

Matt:     Yeah, charmed life I led.

Brian:     And when did you get to DC?

Matt:     Late 2001.

Brian:     Got it.

Matt:     I came down here for work.

Brian:     Awesome, have you been here ever since?

Matt:     Yeah.

Brian:     That's awesome, and now what about, so obviously music is a big part of your life, outside of music, what do you do? Hobbies, interests, what do you got?

Matt:     I'm an avid swimmer.

Brian:     What does that mean?

Matt:     Well, I-

Brian:     Twice a week, three times a week? How far?

Matt:     About three times a week. I usually swim consistently for about an hour or so, just continuously swimming laps.  Focus on freestyle, and breaststroke, and all that good stuff. I think it's a good cardiovascular activity, and [crosstalk 00:03:22]-

Brian:     Were you on the swim team as a kid or something?

Matt:     Meditative as well.

Brian:     Yeah.

Matt:     Yeah, I was on a swim team growing up. I think beginning of first or second grade.

Brian:     Oh wow-

Matt:     And continued on through middle school. So about the time that the saxophone lessons ended was when I decided to end my time on the swim team.

Brian:     Wow, alright-

Matt:     And really focused on music.

Brian:     I gotcha, so lots of swimming. What else?

Matt:     Let's see, I'm a huge college basketball fan.

Brian:     Really? Which team?

Matt:     Go Tar Heels. UNC-

Brian:     There it is-

Matt:     I'm a diehard Tar Heels basketball fan. It originates back to ... In the late '80s I was a fan of a player named Jeff Lebo, who kind of grew up around my hometown in Carlisle. So I sort of followed his career when I was younger and-

Brian:     Yeah-

Matt:     Yeah, went to he and his dad's basketball camp that he had, growing up around my house. So getting that sort of encouragement from somebody that I idolized I thought, this seems like a good school, a good college basketball school to follow. So that was my indoctrination into the world of the Carolina Tar Heels basketball-

Brian:     There it is. Go Tar Heels-

Matt:     History-

Brian:     I love it. Alright, now what do you have in your music collection that might surprise us?

Matt:     Well, I'm a huge fan of Dinosaur Jr., even though a lot of the music that tends to fall out of my head is more folk rock. A band like Dinosaur is just extremely aggressive from a decibel point of view.

Brian:     For those folks who don't know Dinosaur, what kind of music is it? Are we talking hardcore heavy metal?

Matt:     I think it originated in hardcore, but it just gradually worked its way out of hardcore somehow, and it's just really loud, melodic metal, with a little bit of a classic rock, Black Sabbath bend towards it.

Brian:     Wow, alright-

Matt:     But the main vocalist has I think a lot of influences with Neil Young.

Brian:     Got it, and that name one more time, if people want to check that out.

Matt:     Dinosaur Jr.

Brian:     Dinosaur Jr.

Matt:     They're a band based in Amherst, Massachusetts-

Brian:     Oh, look at that-

Matt:     They've been around for I think a little over 30 years.

Brian:     Wow, okay-

Matt:     Yeah, so they've got some history.

Brian:     And what about ... So funniest moment that comes to mind when you think on your music career so far?

Matt:     The funniest moment that comes to mind? Well, I was playing an open mic at now a defunct music venue in Bethesda. I was playing an original song called Indigo Bunting. That's off my first EP called Motorcycle Breakfast. One of the owners of this particular establishment told me, "Hey, I really like that song, but it sounds like you are doing a really terrible job of impersonating Elvis Costello." I was just kind of like, "What the heck are you even saying right now?"

Brian:     I see-

Matt:     It sounds nothing like Elvis Costello, but if I was a sucky version of Elvis Costello at that point in time, there are worse compliments, or lack thereof, that could be shared with you after you performed.

Brian:     I was gonna say, that'd be a funny moment, but I think I'd try to find a way to look at that one positively, just because I got compared to Elvis Costello. So I guess if that's what he thinks of when he hears you, then there's a lot worse ways that could go. That's for sure.

Matt:     Yeah, I took it a little bit harsh at first, but afterwards I just thought, whatever.

Brian:     It's kind of funny.

Matt:     Yeah.

Brian:     Wow, that's wild. Now tell us a story about a time you tried and failed.

Matt:     Tried and failed? There were plenty to count, but to really just pinpoint one in particular, I was at an IOTA Open Mic trying out some new material. And for some reason, my body temperature was going all over the place. Some of it might've had to do with the fact that it was over 100 degrees outside. My instrument was all out of whack. I hadn't humidified, probably the way that I should have, leading up to this Wednesday night open mic. My pick hand just was really clamming up. I just couldn't get my act together. There were at least two or three instances where I just dropped my pick halfway through certain songs. It felt very, deeply pathetic at the time. You get people saying, "Yeah, keep going, keep going." But at that point, the songs are just kind of ... It's sort of a done deal. I wasn't going to make the impression with this material that I was really proud to share for the first time.

Brian:     Yeah, man-

Matt:     So that was a sincere failure.

Brian:     So how'd you pick yourself up off the ground from that one? Because I mean, you gotta move past these things. You're still here doing this, so that didn't kill it for you.

Matt:     Honestly, I just picked up the pick and said, "Well, let's give it another shot. Let's keep going."

Brian:     Yep.

Matt:     Let's just keep going.

Brian:     You know, sometimes you have to do that. So then, my favorite question to ask on this one is, if you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be?

Matt:     Play shows. Honestly, play shows. Don't be afraid to try new material. Connect with your local artist. Go out and support them. Utilize any open mics that are happening in your hometown to meet other musicians. It's a great opportunity to not just hear new music, but potentially show swap, or set up shows with one another. I think the more opportunities you give yourself to bounce your own ideas off of your fellow artists, you create that sort of support, and reciprocity. I think you grow as a person, you grow as an artist. People, they will be more inclined to come out to one of your shows, and follow what you're up to on a regular basis.

Brian:     Absolutely-

Matt:     For me, it's all about giving back to a scene that you're a part of in whatever way you feel is true to you.

Brian:     Yep, I mean, I created a radio show about it. So I feel you on that, pay it forward, absolutely. So if folks want to find out more about you, and follow what you got going on, where do they go?

Matt:     Well, they can go to MattTarkaMusic.com. The easiest way to remember my last name is that it rhymes with parka.

Brian:     You clever man you, look at you go, parka-

Matt:     With a T-

Brian:     Parka with a T, okay-

Matt:     [crosstalk 00:10:42] music, MattTarkaMusic.com. You can follow me on all kinds of different social media-

Brian:     Yep, which one is your favorite?

Matt:     [crosstalk 00:10:49]. My favorite right now is probably Instagram.

Brian:     Lot of Instagram?

Matt:     I haven't used it as much as I've wanted to, but I really enjoy the sort of instant gratification of it. I also like Twitter. Facebook is okay. I also put out a newsletter through ReverbNation that you can sign up for as well.

Brian:     Cool, and so all of these places, obviously if they tune into those, they'll also find out about that upcoming EP you've got coming out?

Matt:     Absolutely, yes.

Brian:     Fantastic, and what was that date again? September-

Matt:     It's September 29.

Brian:     Nice, and it's called?

Matt:     It's called Vision Hazy.

March 28, 2017 - Special Guest: Daniel Hill of YellowTieGuy

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FROM TODAY'S SHOW

Music

  1. Unhappy by Billy Winn (Pop. Dance, Electronic)
  2. First Move by YellowTieGuy (Rock)
  3. Surely Late by Matt Tarka (Rock)
  4. Summer Job by A Shrewdness of Apes (Hard Rock, Progressive)
  5. Spring Hill by Jason Mendelson (Rock)
  6. Good Enough by Alex Vans (Rock/Blues)

 

NEWS & LINKS

  • April 7th, Lionize, Drop Electric, Of Tomorrow - at Hellbender Brewery where all the money goes to AYUDA / ACLU to provide lawyers for immigrants in DC/MD/VA.  Tickets almost sold out.

  • Yellowtieguy hosts the Tuesday Night Open Mic Night at Villian and Saints in Bethesda.  Check him out every Tuesday

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-



Daniel Hill of YellowTieGuy

VIDEO - BIO - LINKS - TRANSCRIPT

Bio:

Daniel Hill DC Music Rocks

Yellow Tie Guy is the DC area's premier Alternative/Rock band with performers hailing from Washington DC, Maryland, and Virginia. YTG released their second full length album "Play On Words", featuring singles "Anthem" and "First Move" on November 25, 2016 before taking a short break for the holidays. With plans to tour and expand their national reach in 2017, the band has already started securing dates through November of 2017, and will release singles with special guest artists throughout the year.

 

Daniel Warren Hill is the lead songwriter and vocalist for Yellow Tie Guy, and wears a number of other hats (and ties) as well. Daniel is owner of community based record label, Alchemical Records, which is working to grow more community with an online magazine and radio station. Daniel works with his father, Jim, to hand build custom tube guitar amps at VVT Amplifiers, is the host of the weekly open mic every Tuesday at Villain & Saint in Bethesda, MD, and is also a Sound Engineer and Producer with over 17 years of personal experience in the industry.

Daniel Hill DC Music Rocks

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:    Daniel Warren Hill is the lead singer and lead song-writer and vocalist for Yellow Tie Guy. The group has members from DC, Maryland, and Virginia, and released their second full-length album "Play on Words" this past November. Daniel also wears a number of other hats as well. He is the owner of community-based record label Alchemical Records. He manages an online magazine and an online radio station. He works with his father Jim to hand-build custom two guitar amps at VVT Amplifiers. He hosts the weekly open mic night you heard about earlier, every Tuesday at Villain and Saint in Bethesda Maryland. He is also a sound engineer and producer with over 17 years of personal experience in the industry.

     I first saw Yellow Tie Guy and heard about them through the Capital City showcase. Shout-out to [Christian Hunt 00:53] at the Capital City Showcase because he does some cool things. He's been an artist on there and I saw this guy on stage with the Capital City showcase. Just cool sounds, as you heard from that sound. Listeners, it's with great pleasure that I introduce Daniel Hill.

Daniel:    Thank you. It's always humbling when somebody talks about you. I don't know how you feel when somebody does it for you but when somebody does it for me, I just want to crawl under a rock somewhere and then cover myself up with a blanket.

Brian:    Well, thank you for tolerating me there while I did that, because I want to set the stage for them. Now ell us, how did you get started in this music thing? Where did that come from?

Daniel:    The long story short is going to be that I've been singing my whole life and I've always had a passion for music and different instruments as I was growing up. I got into music as an opportunity for ... I guess you could say a career choice. I made a career choice when I found out I was going to be a dad. She inspired me to pursue my dreams and set a goal for her that whatever it is that she was interested in doing, that she could also find a way to make that successful and happen for her.

Brian:    Wow. What is her name?

Daniel:    Her name is Madison.

Brian:    Wow.

Daniel:    She's seven.

Brian:    Oh, Madison if you hear this, shout-out to you Madison.

Daniel:    She runs the playlist in the car when we're driving. She gets to pick the songs.

Brian:    Oh, yeah?

Daniel:    Yeah.

Brian:    Oh, that's awesome.

Daniel:    We're singing Ring of Fire together, that's a song we're learning to sing together. Also If I Had a Million Dollars, trying to get some two part things going on.

Brian:    Very cool, this is what happens when you're a seven year old in a family with musicians. I love it, that is cool. Well, now ... There's a lot of things going on. I listed a lot of things in that introduction, so why don't you ... Where did Yellow Tie Guy from and the idea for the Yellow Tie? Talk about.

Daniel:    When I was 11 I was visiting a camp, like a youth group thing in North Carolina at a pretty big church down there. They had brought up some of the young preacher speaker boys to come up on stage and I was one of those guys that came up, but the Pastor couldn't remember my name when he invited me up to actually come onto the stage. He goes, "You, the guy with the yellow tie. Come on up here." I'm 11 years old, and I go up and do my thing. Three years later I'm in Virginia visiting a church and they recognized me as the guy with the yellow tie, "Oh you were the guy with the yellow tie down in North Carolina." I was like, how do you remember that? I don't even remember what color tie I was wearing that day. Then it just kind of stuck with me that this was something that was memorable, and when I started playing solo shows ... When I started playing solo shows ... Oh, that's something for my school. Too many smart objects. Wrong button.

Brian:    So wait a minute, so Yellow Tie Guy actually come ... that is amazing. Somebody called you out as being the guy with the yellow tie and it stuck, all those years?

Daniel:    It stuck. I didn't make it up, somebody else made it up and-

Brian:    I love it. Oh my god.

Daniel:    When I started playing solo acoustic shows as a teenager it was just kind of a gimmick, "Oh, I'll just be the Yellow Tie Guy." Then as time went by ... the band, when I started playing with a band and we were going to record a record, it was like, "Well, do you want to be a different band name, because I'm totally cool with it." I was just using Yellow Tie Guy for funsies by myself, but I don't assume that it represents a group of people, per say. They were like, "No." I was like, "Okay, well you're just telling me you're too lazy to come up with a unique band name and so we're just going to run with this then and that will be fine."

Brian:    I'd like to think of it as they loved the idea so much that they wanted to do that one too. I don't know.

Daniel:    I just think everybody was skeptical about the project at first and so ... it'll be like, 30 years from now it will be like Kid Rock, "I wish we could have called ourselves something different."

Brian:    No, I hope that happens. Daniel, I hope we're talking about this 30 years from now, and I can talk about the fact that you were on the show and I found out that you wore a yellow tie to church and that's where the name came from.

Daniel:    That's right.

Brian:    I really hope that that happens. That would be amazing.

Daniel:    It stuck.

Brian:    Then you also ... Alchemical Records, what is that? Talk about that.

Daniel:    When we put out our first record Alchemical Records was already existing as kind of an email chain where people would just kind of hit me up and they would ask me for advice or ask me for a contact and I would go, "Well I don't have the answer to this, or I don't know how to do this for you, so let me forward you on to this person, maybe they can help you out." It was just kind of a long chain-mail email newsletter type situation. Nothing official.

       When we put out the first record we used Alchemical Records as a name to stick on the back of it. It was right at the height of DIY and do it all yourself. I was like, "I'll just put that out under my own label. All these other people are putting their music out on their own label, so I'll do it too." Then once people had listened to it and had seen the album art and things like that, everybody was really impressed and I started getting some interest in, "Well how do I get on the label? What does the label do?". It just kind of developed from there. It's still very community-based in that everybody we talk to is somebody we just have a genuine relationship with at some point, or run into and meet. It continues to grow but there's no specific set rate. It's really just about trying to help ... working with the artist individually. The artists that are on the label, they get the help that I can best provide for them based on their needs.

Brian:    Wow.

Daniel:    We mostly try to focus on providing marketing distribution. Anybody can distribute themselves, but marketing is something that you really have to work through from start to finish and it has to be a long-term goal for artists. Artist development is really what we specialize in.

Brian:    Got it. When you say artist development, does that mean helping them refine their sound or come up with/finish an album, or finish a piece of work? Say more on that.

Daniel:    I mean, from an engineering standpoint I might visit a show and then make recommendations to improve their stage sound from their perspective, not necessarily from what an engineer does. Then from a marketing perspective we might try to figure out how we can get them to supply me with tracks and artwork significantly before their set release date, so that way we can try to get some buzz built out about it, even if it's just from the underground or from those people that I can individually email, or share something with specifically and try to just grow it out that way.

      There's a lot of time ... it takes a long time to properly market and promote. I'm not saying we're always guilty of properly marketing or providing anything, but it takes a long time, and longer than people think. They go and they spend all this money or time recording a record and then when it's time to release it it's like, tomorrow, "Here you go guys, we just finished it, and here you go." There's not necessarily a lot of forethought to-

Brian:    Yeah, I heard it's a stat the other day that you should spend as much time and money on the PR for the release as you do on making the record.

Daniel:    Sure.

Brian:    That was a eye-opening ratio, because I thought it was more all about making the good music and then ... if you build it they will come does not work with music releases.

Daniel:    You have to tell people.

Brian:    Getting the word out there, you've got to tell people about it.

Daniel:    One way or another.

Brian:    Now then the VVT Amplifiers is the other thing we talked about in the intro. Talk about that.

Daniel:    Well, when I was a teenager and playing in a band with my brother we got what was called a real amp, a tube amp at the time. My dad had heard it and was like, "I think I could build something like that or better." He took my mom's cutting board and brown pan and took it in the basement and cut holes in it and bolting things together and put transformers and tubs into it and he made a little 5 watt amplifier out of a cookie sheet-

Brian:    Stop it. Out of a cookie sheet?

Daniel:    Out of a cutting board ... a cookie sheet and cutting board.

Brian:    Wow!

Daniel:    It wasn't as good. That amp was not as good as the amp that we owned at the time, but things improved and that's where the company developed. As I was continuing to just play music for funsies, my dad was building amplifiers. Then as things got more serious for me, things were becoming more serious for him and we started collaborating. I do not have his engineering wisdom. I've got a lot of catching up to do I come from a business mind and a marketing mind and also just trying to build that one fan at a time approach. I try to focus on web development, business development, and just working with artists, working with our continuing to outreach and find more artists locally to work with, and studios to work with.

Brian:    Why would they ... there's a lot of amplifier companies out there, so what makes VVT special?

Daniel:    Well I truly believe that we don't build anything ... none of our models of amplifiers are things that we are regurgitating. If you want a Marshall amplifier, you can call us and we can absolutely build you what would be a 1970-whatever vintage-hand Marshall, whatever. But those companies are already making great products that sound good that a lot of people love. We're not here to poo-poo on anybody's product. We're here to try to build something that's unique and original and really helps bring out the unique characteristic of the guitar player, rather than to try to focus on what we sound like as an amplifier company. Each amplifier meets a different need for a different style of player, and you're talking to the two guys that build the amps in their garage, literally. We've done our own R&D. We spent our money on R&D, we spend a lot of time before we release new products to work with artists to try to get it better. We've got a lot of talented players using our stuff.

       I think that the only thing I hope for is that we'll have more diversity in our artists, because I think that tube amps in general appeal to an older player. I also think that it appeals to sometimes certain styles of music. We'd like to expand the artists that we're working with as far as genres, but I think as far as quality and that unique, "Hey, I can drive to the place where I'm going to have my amp built or worked on and meet the people ..."

Brian:    Right, so you can actually see it in production, and see it in the DC area.

Daniel:    If you make us, yeah, you can come watch us build it if you make us-

Brian:    You can bring your own cutting board and then watch it become and amplifier.

Daniel:    I am tempted. I am tempted to try to put together some workshops where I would teach people how to build an amplifier like we did the first time, but I can't imagine what kind of legal concerns we might have to address or safety concerns.

Brian:    Probably, there's probably something. That might be a little complicated, you're right.

Daniel:    We're afraid to tell people how to do it on their own.

Brian:    I love that. All right, now tell us about you outside of ... we've got all these projects that you're working on, and then you as a guy outside of that. What do you do for fun? What's outside?

Daniel:    Aside from music, I really like to be outdoors. I like sunshine, I like hiking, camping. I'm actually a really country-bumpkin guy. Get me away from the city ...

Brian:    Country-bumpkin guy.

Daniel:    Country-bumpkin, yeah.

Brian:    Excellent, so that means what?

Daniel:    The further away from the city I am, the more comfortable I feel in my element. Like I'm an earth ... I wear earth tones, I just happen to be that reflection of my personality where I really do enjoy nature and the atmosphere. I'm actually a bit ... I'm a recluse by nature, because I believe that the work ethic that I have means that I have to kind of keep going, keep going, keep going and I work and work and work from home until I pass out, or until I just can't stand it anymore. People have to put up with me from that end, but personality-wise I like to go hiking and camping and skiing and paint-balling and laser-tagging. I try to stay active.

Brian:    Get out and do fun things-

Daniel:    That's right.

Brian:    -and away from the city, when you can.

Daniel:    Right. The city is more of the opportunity that I see to be able to share the music with more people in a condensed area. Or like, we go to visit a lot of small cities and try to perform to a specific audience that's very open-minded to what we're about to play. As far as like, living conditions, I think I'm more much at home getting eggs out of a chicken coop than I am having my butcher be my next door neighbor, per say. If that makes sense.

Brian:    Yeah, absolutely. Now, what do you have in your music collection that might surprise us?

Daniel:    Gosh, well it might surprise people to learn that ... the influences that I have aside from gospel growing up in church, I think that my music is influenced from everybody ranging from Frank Sinatra to Metallica or heavier ... Living Sacrifice or a band like that. We had recently opened up for a kind of big, kind of Christian circle band called Project 86, and that's a reflection of stuff that we were into growing up, and Living Sacrifice. There's another ... the Pennsylvania metal band that was young, we were really in to. I can't think of their name right now.

Brian:    Nice. All right, so some of that stuff. What about ... your earliest memory with music, where does that go?

Daniel:    I was on stage singing, I mean at four years old. I'm dressed up in suspenders and a bow tie, matching-the-person-standing-next-to-me kind of thing.

Brian:    Okay.

Daniel:    That's probably what I remember, is being young and in a barbershop quartet type situation at a young age, and wishing I stuck with that, because barbershop quartet is still one of the coolest things ever.

Brian:    I totally agree man. It really ... it's amazing what they're able to do with just four voices.

Daniel:    There's a certain integrity, like a pure authentic quality to having four people that have just found a way to be that cohesive. It's really intimidating.

Brian:    Yeah, intimidating and really impressive. I love it.

 All right, so if there's one piece of advice that you could offer, what would it be?

Daniel:    As far as a musician, maybe ...?

Brian:    In general. However you chose to answer the question. I love to ask it open-ended.

Daniel:    Relax. Take a deep breath and just relax, because we are so busy in this area. I feel like my work ethic comes from living in the area where there's high expectations set to achieve or to accomplish things. It's great to be driven like that, but at the same time there's so many people that are in such a hurry and they don't realize that ... whether it's by being an overly-aggressive driver or by cutting somebody off for that job opportunity to try to get ahead a little faster than somebody else, it really is nonsense because we're all on the same similar path as one another, and we're all headed to similar destinations. We all are just going to get there when we get there.

Brian:    Got it, so relax.

Daniel:    Relax, take a deep breath.

Brian:    All right. Chill out, you'll get there. You will get there.

Daniel:    That's right. All things in good time.

Brian:    Now if people are really interested in learning more about you and Yellow Tie Guy, where can they go online to find you?

Daniel:    Well, there's a website that is YellowTieGuy.com, or it used to be just ".us", ".U-S", but we got the ".com" from a life insurance agent that was formerly selling and sharing about himself under YellowTieGuy.com.

Brian:    Another Yellow Tie Guy? Dang it!

Daniel:    There was another Yellow Tie Guy.

Brian:    The scandal!

Daniel:    That's right. We managed to get that URL, and then we're also on pretty much any social media outlet that you can think of. I'm probably personally most active on Instagram because I take the picture and share it through Instagram and it goes to these other outlets automatically. I'm actively seeing things that are going on in Instagram and things like Facebook and Twitter are harder for me because there's so much information going on there at ... so much information for me to try to retain.

Brian:    Yeah.

Daniel:    I get a little overwhelmed.

Brian:    Got it. All right, so Instagram is a great place.

Daniel:    Instagram is great to stay in direct touch. Or send me a message through the website.

Brian:    Absolutely, yeah, definitely check out the website. It's really cool what you've been able to do and especially all- these projects too. Check out Alchemical Records, cool things they got going on over there, and the radio station, the streaming radio station. Just really cool stuff Daniel's got going on. Definitely do check him out online.

August 9, 2016 - Special Guest: Christian of Capital City Showcase

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MUSIC FROM TODAY'S SHOW

  1. Native Deen - M-U-S-L-I-M (Hip-Hop/R&B)
  2. Nappy Riddem - Rastar (Funk/Hip-Hop)
  3. Bells and Hunters - Weddings and Funerals (Rock)
  4. Rachel Levitin - Secret's Safe (Pop/Rock/Indie Rock)
  5. Yellowtieguy - War (Should I Be So Surprised) (Rock)
  6. Adrian Krygowski - Elbow Grease (Country/Bluegrass/Folk)
  7. Justin Trawick & The Common Good - Goodbye (Bluegrass/Rock/Americana)

Live Music Venue Spotlight (as discussed on the show, site of this week's Capital City Showcase): Atlas Brew Works


Christian of The Capital City Showcase

Video - Bio - Photos

Christian Hunt DC Music Rocks

The Capital City Showcase is the variety show that features the best performing artists in the DC area.  Hosted by comedian and life-long Washingtonian Christian Hunt, the Showcase has featured some of the best stand-up comedians, improv comedians, storytellers, rock and funk bands, acoustic singer-songwriters, and hip-hop artists in the scene.  For over five years, we have put the spotlight on DC's vibrant arts scene and shown the DMV is a premiere place for top-level talent.  Showcase performers have toured across the country and been featured on national television programs such as The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, Conan, Last Comic Standing, and The Voice

Website:  http://capitalcityshowcase.com

Facebook: http://facebook.com/capitalcityshowcase

Twitter:  http://twitter.com/CapCityShowcase

Youtube:  http://youtube.com/capitalcityshowcase

Instagram:  http://instagram.com/capitalcityshowcase

Snapchat: CapCityShowcase