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The Sea Life

February 07, 2017 - Special Guest: Alex Drewenskus of WAMU's Capital Soundtrack

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FROM TODAY'S SHOW

NEWS

  • Clarendon Grill in Arlington, VA now features DC area original music.  They call it the Thursday Circus, and the evening generally features at least 2 original bands:  Our host, Brian Nelson-Palmer, will be there this Thursday with Fellowcraft, joined by The Forever Agos with Cathy Ditoro and Derek Evry.  Come say hi!  Next week is Pleasure Train and Escaper,  Following that is Olivia Mancini, VA Southpaws, and Nova-tones.  Linked bands we've featured on this show!

  • We're up to 20 videos from DC area talent who've shared their Tiny Desk videos for NPR with us!  Check them all out on the Find-Browse Artists Page!

  • DC Music Resources Page on this website, continuously updated list of: Venues, Festivals, Event Series, Media, Radio, Blogs, Podcasts, Organizations, Facebook Groups, Record Stores, Labels, Management, Studios.

MUSIC

  1. Aaron's Blues - Aaron Myers (Jazz/R&B)
  2. Serious - Roof Beams (Folk/Indie)
  3. Sensory Insensitivity - ShowPony (Indie/Instrumental)
  4. Cairo - Paperhaus (Indie/Alternative)
  5. Ashe - Nitemoves (Techno/Electronic)
  6. Hounds of Thoughts - The Sea Life (Rock/Shoegaze)
  7. Intro/Outro music by Fellowcraft (Hard Rock/Blues)

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Alex Drewenskus

VIDEO-BIO-PHOTOS-LINKS

Bio:

Alex Drewenskus is a broadcast technician at WAMU 88.5, Washington, D.C.'s NPR member station, and currently engineers WAMU's 1A, a daily talk show that takes a deep and unflinching look at America to bring context and insight to stories unfolding across the country and the world. He has previously worked on The Diane Rehm ShowKen Rudin's Political Junkie, and has worked at the famed electronic music venue U Street Music Hall. In mid-2016, Alex helped launch WAMU's Capital Soundtrack project, an initiative that showcases local music on WAMU's airwaves in order to connect the station and its listeners to the music of the region. Since Capital Soundtrack's introduction, WAMU has played nearly 2,000 songs by artists from all over the D.C. area and encourages artists to submit their own music to become a part of the project. Alex graduated from American University with a degree in Audio Technology and is a native of Washington state.

Links:
http://wamu.org/music
http://bandwidth.fm
https://twitter.com/bandwidthDC
https://www.facebook.com/bandwidth.wamu

http://the1a.org
https://twitter.com/1A
https://www.facebook.com/the1ashow

Interview Transcript

Brian:     Alex Drewenskus from WAMU's Capital Soundtrack is a broadcast technician at WAMU 88.5 FM which is Washington DC's NPR member station. Currently engineers WAMU's 1A which is a daily talk show which brings context and insight to stories unfolding across the country and around the world. He previously worked on the Diane Rehm Show.

Alex:      Rehm Show.

Brian:     Rehm Show. Yes, please give me these pronunciations right. I got the Diane Rehm Show, Ken Rudin's Political Junkie, and at the famed electronic music venue, U Street Music Hall. In mid-2016 Alex helped launch WAMU's Capital Soundtrack Project which is an initiative that showcases local music on WAMU's air waves in order to connect the station and its listeners to the music of the DC region. Since Capital Soundtrack's introduction WAMU has played nearly 2,000 songs by artists from the DC region and encourages artists to submit their own music to become a part of the project.

                  I first came across Capital Soundtrack with my band, Fellowcraft. We were looking for ways to spread the ways about Fellowcraft and I heard that on 88.5 they played local music. We came across Capital Soundtrack and they've played Fellowcraft along with, like it said, several thousand songs. Listeners, it's with great pleasure that I introduce Alex.

Alex:      Thank you, Brian.

Brian:     Thanks so much for being here.

Alex:      That was an extensive introduction, thank you for that.

Brian:     Well, I want to give them the background so now you can tell us more. Now, tell us about the Capital Soundtrack, let's start there. Capital Soundtrack. Where did that come from? What's the story behind that?

Alex:      Yeah, so a team of us at WAMU have been working on Capital Soundtrack for about the last eight months, we launched it about six months ago. Essentially, what it is is an initiative that wants to play as much local music as possible so that we can ... Sorry, DC region music as possible so that we can further associate WAMU which is a public media station, it's a public radio station. We want to associate our station with the sound of the region so we don't want WAMU to just be a part of the region, we want it to sound like the region as well.

Brian:     That's ... And I really, I think it does, it's really ... I can't tell you how many times I've seen on Facebook somebody say, "Oh my God, my song was just on 88.5 FM." It really is, it's wonderful that you're making that connection with the region. Thank you guys and thank you WAMU for starting this initiative and for doing this.

Alex:      Well, you're welcome.

Brian:     Now, what's the ... You said it's an NPR affiliate. What's the MPR connection to you guys?

Alex:      Essentially the way NPR works is NPR produces shows and they distribute those shows to NPR member stations which are community radio stations, public radio stations throughout the country. Most major cities have an NPR member station in them. The one for the DC area is WAMU 88.5 FM. If you tune in each station might have different content and they might have shows that they create. Then they might also play the shows that are the flagship programs of MPR. Shows like All Things Considered, Morning Edition. Then, it's up to stations to determine how much of those programs they want to play and what they want to play when those programs are not playing, so they can make their own content.

Brian:     Got it. How much is the ... How much is you guys here locally, and then how much of the ... What's the proportion of, like, NPR and you guys here at 88.5?

Alex:      The majority of our programming is bought from several public media organizations. NPR, American Public Media is another large one, that they abbreviate their name to APM, so you may have heard of their stuff. Then, several other production companies. We pick a lot of shows for the weekend, that we only play an hour of that organization's programming a week because they only make maybe one show a week, that kind of thing. During the weekdays the majority of our programming is bought from NPR. We also have our main programs, the Kojo Nnamdi Show and 1A which is another program that I work on.

Brian:     Capital Soundtrack then, how will people ... Tell more about what that actually means? They're going to hear little clips of music behind what somebody's saying? What are they going to hear if they hear the Capital Soundtrack specifically?

Alex:      Each day we allocate 20 songs, 20 songs that are by DC area musicians. We allow our engineers and hosts to play those songs during our local breaks. During a show like Morning Edition they'll hear content made by NPR. Then during the break which we know comes at certain times, agreed upon times, during that time we have the ability to play that under our host talking. Say if the host wants to, really likes the track or something they can just fade it up and they can play that track for as long as they want.  If it's a one minute long break they might talk for 30 seconds and then you might hear 30 seconds of a local musician.

Brian:     Got it. This is in between the breaks in NPR, this is where you'll hear the Capital Soundtrack stuff.

Alex:      Exactly.

Brian:     During other times of the day too? Is it throughout the day?

Alex:      It's throughout the day. It's 24 hours a day. Even though we go into automation basically we allow our computer system to play our program shows overnight. We have basically programmed it so that it will take snippets of Capital Soundtrack songs and it will insert them into those breaks as well. It's all throughout the day. The Kojo Nnamdi Show, they use that music as their break music. They use it as not only a transition away from their host but the vocal host who's talking during that time might also use that music. It's a lot of different opportunities for people to hear local music, local DC area music.

Brian:     That is so cool. Now, talk about ... On 1A, you're working with that show now. What is 1A? Tell us about that?

Alex:      1A is the successor show to the Diane Rehm Show. Diane Rehm was a staple of public radio for almost four decades. She stepped away from the microphone, she's 80-years-old.

Brian:     Oh my goodness.

Alex:      She's been doing this for a really long time and she's become one of the flagship programs of NPR. She's really widely recognized as one of the greatest female hosts and hosts in general of NPR. 1A is the successor show to that. Our new host, Joshua Johnson, he's about half her age, half of Diane's age.

Brian:     Which makes him an incredibly young and handsome gentleman I'm sure.

Alex:      Yeah. Yeah, he's great. He came from California and he just joined us. We just launched our show on January 2nd of this year. Basically, we're a two hour talk show and we look at the issues of our time, the culture reporting, arts reporting, politics, news events, all different kinds of things. 1A essentially stands for the first amendment. We encourage free speech, free expression, and we want our listeners to engage with us on the show. We really call out for listeners and their input as much as possible.

Brian:     How would they provide their input?

Alex:      Basically, we have Twitter, we have Facebook, we have email. They can call us live. If you want to find us on Twitter we are at 1A. We're just the number 1, the numeral 1 and the letter A. It's just the two letter handle on Twitter, it's pretty rare.

Brian:     That's about as easy as it gets.

Alex:      We're very proud that we got that actually.

Brian:     That's amazing.

Alex:      Yeah. It's many, many different resources. You can go to the1a.org and you can also find more information about the show there.

Brian:     Find it all there, that's so cool. Now, Alex, tell us about you and your story with the DC music scene.

Alex:      I moved here about six years ago and I went to American Union University. I studied Audio Technology, essentially what is Audio Engineering. I was really interested in recorded music, live music, sound design. I found that DC actually had a great live music scene as you know, Brian, as well.

Brian:     It certainly does, good gracious, yeah.

Alex:      It's extensive. There are so many artists in this area and it's not just DC, it's Maryland, it's Virginia. It's up the river, down the river. It's an entire community of people that create what the sound of this area is. Yeah, that's how I got interested in music, I knew there was this big diversity there.

Brian:     You mentioned in your bio about U Street Music Hall. What's the ... There's a connection there? What's the ... ?

Alex:      Yeah. When I was in school I was lucky to get a job at U Street Music Hall. For those who don't know, it's a dance club and concert venue. It's on U Street of course, given the name. It's often voted as one of the greatest sound systems on the entire East Coast. It's a basement venue and it's about ... It can hold over a thousand people in there.

Brian:     Holy smokes.

Alex:      Yeah, it's a great venue.

Brian:     Check out U Street Music Hall, that's amazing. Now, one of my favorite questions that I love to ask is, what's one piece of advice that you would offer?

Alex:      One piece of advice that I would offer is go seek out live music. If you don't like live music go seek out recorded music. Go online. There are plenty of resources throughout the region. If you go to a place like Hometown Sounds they create a great radio show themselves. Shows like yours, DC Music Rocks. We have the DC Music Download. There's an incredible wealth of music and talent out there, you just have to find it. There are websites that aggregate all the venues in the area, all the events that are going on. Every night there's a possibility to see live music if you'd like.

Brian:     That's amazing. I'll check out the scene. Now, for those folks who are interested in finding out more, and I want you to share about the submission process for Capital Soundtrack. Talk about the show and where they find you and how they submit, an artist if they're listening with submit music.

Alex:      Yeah. If you go to wamu.org/music you can find all of our play lists. We post a daily play list of the songs that were heard that day.

Brian:     Oh, so you can find it on the website.

Alex:      Absolutely, yes.

Brian:     Awesome.

Alex:      On that page, wamu.org/music, you can also click our submit a track link. If you create music yourself or even if you've heard a track that you like you can recommend a song. You can submit those songs to us and we'll seek them out. If you provide a link to us that's even easier. We'll listen to it. We're looking for instrumental music or instrumental portions of songs at least 30 seconds in length. That's so that our hosts and our engineers can fade in and out of it, they can talk over it if they need to. It's tough with music with vocals because the vocals of the music can clash with a host talking over it sometimes. It's not the easiest so we look for instrumental music or instrumental portions of songs.

Brian:     So cool. Listener, it doesn't have to be the artist. Listeners, if you know of an amazing band that you love in town then share that with WAMU as well because they're playing that stuff as well. Are you guys, so I heard the1a.org. Wamu.org?

Alex:      Org/music. That'll send you to our bandwidth music site. Bandwidth is our music blog basically. It's our online music destination and it covers local and national music news.

Brian:     That's the bandwidth.fm, I've heard that name before. Okay, so bandwidth.fm, check that one out. You guys, social media? I assume you guys are doing that stuff too?

Alex:      Yes, of course.

December 20, 2016 - Special Guest: Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents

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FROM TODAY'S SHOW

NEWS

MUSIC

  1. Prozac & Merlot - The Sea Life (Rock/Garage Rock)
  2. Sleigh Ride - Wylder (Rock/Pop)
  3. The Wild and Beyond - Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents (Rock/Folk Rock)
  4. Small Blade - Stranger in the Alps (Folk)
  5. Antelope - Louis Weeks (Pop/Electronic)
  6. Home - Cynthia Marie (Pop/Jazz Folk)
  7. Kool Kids - Justin Trawick (Bluegrass)
  8. Intro/Outro music by Fellowcraft (Hard Rock/Blues)

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AARON TINJUM AND THE TANGENTS

VIDEO - BIO - PHOTOS - TRANSCRIPT

BIO

DC's Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents released their new full-length album Foreign & Domestic earlier this year with a release show at Rock & Roll Hotel. The folk rock project originally formed in Austin, Texas where they were recognized by the Austin Mayor and City Council with their own official band holiday holiday. Since relocating to DC in 2013, they have opened for the likes of James McCartneyKawehi and Sam Amidon

LINKS

www.aarontinjum.com 

www.facebook.com/AaronTinjum

www.twitter.com/AaronTinjum 

www.soundcloud.com/AaronTinjum

www.youtube.com/TinjumAndTheTangents

aaron tinjum dc music rocks

The new animated music video they discussed in the episode:


INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:     D.C.'s Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents released their new, full length album, Foreign and Domestic, earlier this year, with a release show at Rock and Roll hotel. The folk rock group originally from Austin, Texas, where they were recognized by the city mayor and the city council with their own official band holiday. They relocated back up to D.C., and we consider ourselves so lucky to have them here back in 2013, and are continuing that great tradition of awesome music up here in D.C.

                  Guys, I first heard of these guys when they ... I stumbled across them online, they submitted their stuff to me, I was listening. I saw the bit about ... If you haven't seen, there was a video, what we talked about on October 11th, is their official band holiday in Austin, TX. On October 11th this year, I did a little info about them and posted a video about that experience. Basically, just really cool stuff happening.

                  Bottom line is, listen, it's a great pleasure for me to introduce Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents. I've got Aaron Tinjum and Andrew Cote with me, so say "Hi" guys.

Aaron:   Hey Brian, thanks for having us. 

Andrew:                Yes, thank you so much. 

Brian:     Aaron and Andrew. Tell us about, I'm curious right off the bat, where is Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents? Where did the name come from?

Aaron:   We originally formed in Austin, Texas about five years ago. As I was putting together the project with some of the other members, we were doing what every band does, debating what we should call ourselves. 

Brian:     Yup, happens a lot. 

Aaron:   I don't think any of the members wanted full ownership over the song since I was writing over them, they didn't want to be associated with my saddest emotions.

Brian:     Oh, okay. 

Aaron:   We conducted a Facebook poll, and the Tangents was the ultimate winner. I'm not sure that's a solid methodology for selecting a band name, but that's what won and that's what stuck ever since.

Brian:     Got it, so it was a Facebook poll. I love that, all right. Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents. How did you guys come together. 

Aaron:   It's been a gradual process. Originally started with our latest album we released earlier this year, Foreign and Domestic. We had six players on that with Andrew on drums over here. Andrew was found here in D.C. at the Treehouse Lounge.

Brian:     Nice. 

Aaron:   He was playing for us and we were looking for a new drummer, having relocated out here. We had a violinist, Katie Smith. Bass player also moved from Austin, Andrew Berglund. Andrew introduced us to a great pianist, David Chavez, who plays on the album. Our banjo player who didn't move out to D.C., still in Austin, recorded remotely, but actually came up for the album release show.

Andrew:                We're working on getting him moving out here soon. 

Brian:     Very cool. How do you convince people to come to D.C. Is Austin ... I've heard great things about, in D.C., they talk about great things about Austin. What made you move to D.C.?

Aaron:   I'd love to take credit for convincing other people to move to D.C., I don't think I can do that. I think musically, compared to Austin, you have a very supportive community here. Not that you don't have that in Austin, but in Austin, everyone's a musician. 

Brian:     Got it. 

Aaron:   Your audience is full of musicians, whereas here, you might have a real, live listening audience that isn't critiquing your every chord.

Brian:     I guess that's good. It's a good place to move. What about on a personal side, you guys, outside of Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents, what's life like for you guys? What do you do?

Andrew:                I guess I can jump in here. I work professionally as a musician, but, you know, you've experienced Brian, that takes many different forms. I teach at George Mason University. I work in the School of Music there, as well as the Honors college. I teach classes ranging from ear training to Intro to Research Methods, and kind of everything in between.

Brian:     Wow.

Andrew:                Yeah, I do that, then I also work at church, in Fairfax, Virginia. I direct the choirs there. I'm sort of Composer in Residence as well, so I do a lot of arranging and composing and so-

Brian:     Got it.

Andrew:                Yeah. 

Brian:     Drums is your main instrument, but clearly you play a lot more.

Andrew:                Yeah. I'm trained as a percussionist, but in high school, I learned how to play guitar, kind of self taught. Same thing with bass and piano. Just from there, I studied music education and I kind of was on a one way trajectory to do music and had been able to piece together a living doing it.

Brian:     That's amazing. I love the fact that you're doing it. I'm a drummer too, but I got a day job. I can imagine that it's a big leap of faith to get started and probably a challenge and some struggles sometimes, but it has to be pretty rewarding too, and I admire you for that.

Andrew:                Thanks. Supportive wife has helped. 

Brian:     Shout out to the supportive wife.

Andrew:                That's right. She has a day job, so that's also helping.

Brian:     It's a team effort. 

Andrew:                That's right.

Brian:     I got it. I love it. Okay guys. Aaron, you skipped out on that, what about you outside of music? Are you [crosstalk 00:05:14] what else is there to Aaron? 

Aaron:   For my day job, you have to fund your musical and creative endeavors somehow.

Brian:     Got it.

Aaron:   I'm a writer full time working in clean energy. I actually work remotely in D.C.

Brian:     Wow. Where's the headquarters? 

Aaron:   Headquarter house in Ivy City.

Brian:     Ivy City? 

Aaron:   Yeah, it's a great, creative community up there. 

Brian:     It seems like it, absolutely. Where, for those listening who don't know where Ivy City is, which Ivy City are we talking about?

Aaron:   The one in Far Northeast Washington D.C.

Brian:     Got it. You're working remotely from a couple miles away.

Aaron:   Correct. 

Brian:     Okay, I'm clear. Okay. Very cool. Funniest moments from you guys performing, or funniest moment that comes to mind.

Andrew:                Really you kind of glossed over how we met Aaron, which I thought was pretty funny.

Aaron:   I'm sorry.

Andrew:                It's okay. I mean, it's a big introduction right? No. Anyways, I was playing drums that night for another D.C. based artist. A woman by the name of Sally [inaudible 00:06:17]. Her and I met, actually though the church that I work at now. She's an amazing Singer/Songwriter, so definitely, I would recommend if you have some time, listening for her music.

                  Anyways, I was playing for her and Aaron come up to me after a set and said, "Hey, do you want to sit in a play drums with us?" I guess about a week prior to that their other drummer just didn't show up for a gig and that was just kind of the end of the time there.

                  Anyways, long story short, we end up meeting then and it turns out they were heading just the next couple of weeks, to go into the studio to start working on this album, Foreign and Domestic. A couple days later, we were in the basement of my townhouse at that time and we started writing this music.

Brian:     Wow. You literally started playing with them when you were on stage?

Andrew:                Yeah, absolutely. The fee was great on the first gig. 

Brian:     Love it, oh my God. What a crazy story. What about success moments that comes to mind? What's the biggest success moment?

Aaron:   Success-wise, I would say definitely being on your program today.

Brian:     Stop it. Stop it. That's, no.

Aaron:   This is as high as we get.

Brian:     You don't get away with that. Give me another one. I want a story. 

Aaron:   Back in Austin-

Brian:     I appreciate it. 

Aaron:   Like you mentioned, we wound up somewhat hilariously getting our own band holiday playing a wide range of random venues from furniture stores, to dive bars, coffee houses, the airport, used clothing shops.

Brian:     Holy smokes. All right. 

Aaron:   Keeping Austin weird, that's one way they do it. Every month, they give away one or two holidays by official proclamations by the Mayor and City Council. That's definitely been up there. Since we've been playing out in D.C., we've opened up for a few great acts at Jammin Java like Sam Amidon, who just played [inaudible 00:08:07] Festival in [inaudible 00:08:09] Wisconsin.

Brian:     Okay. 

Aaron:   Kawehi who's like a looping legend now on YouTube, just turning up the covers. Then Paul McCartney's son, James, we opened for him back in June.

Brian:     Wow, that's wild. I'm curious about the holiday thing. Do you get put in for that? Does someone nominate you? Do they pick names out of a hat? How does that work. 

Aaron:   They have their own, at least when we did it, there was an application system and we were ultimately chosen. You have to kind of show what you've been doing in the scene. All the places you've played, how often you've played. At that time, we were playing a very long string of gigs. 

Brian:     Right, go for it. I love it. What rules do you always break? 

Andrew:                That's a good question. Aaron, why don't you jump in first? 

Aaron:   I would say, unconsciously, first off, we do mostly soft rock. Soft rock isn't notorious for breaking a whole lot of rules, you know? We like to follow the rules.

But I would say, unconsciously, I'm probably the Jar Jar Binks of guitar rhythm. I'm very not good at that and that drive Andrew crazy. That's definitely one rule I'm breaking all the time.

Brian:     The rhythm rule.

Aaron:   I'm consistent with it.

Brian:     It's good, you're reliable about that, I like it. Okay.

Andrew:                I think, my go to thing is just adding more layers to it. Coming up with different string parts or piano, or adding, you know, they're just different layers always kind of being that ... I don't even know if it's just Devil's Advocate, but just always saying, "Okay, what can we do to shape this a little bit more." Yeah, Aaron beats up on himself a little too much with the rhythm thing. I'm the only one counting I guess.

Aaron:   Andrew's the one, and the rest of the band, all the Tangents make all the songs actually good. I just kind of come up with the idea and they polish and clean it for me.

Brian:     Got it. It's cool, especially when bands come together and they do that together, it's cool to hear. It's a cool effect too to be in those rehearsals I think.

What about one thing you've got in your music collection that would surprise us?

Andrew:                Well, I have sort of a weird, strange instrument collection, but my new favorite toy is an instrument call the Otamatone, which is a Japanese instrument. It's basically, if you were to combine a digitalized slide whistle with just this crazy, animated looking face, that's this weird sound. Long story short, it's a synthesizer toy that's like $20, that I've definitely gotten at least $100 worth of entertainment out of.

Brian:     What about artists or interesting music that you listen to that would surprise us?

Aaron:   I've been doing this whole, you know, the cheesy 30 things to do before you turn 30.

Brian:     Excellent.

Aaron:   I've been doing that more from an album perspective. I have a very eclectic mix going right now, where everything from Sketches of Spain by Miles Davis, to if you've watched Westworld at all, they have a soundtrack with all of the player piano tracks, the cover songs going on in the background, which is pretty cool.

Brian:     Oh yeah.

Aaron:   Other than that, Bruce Springsteen's, Nebraska. Tim by The Replacements. I'm going for a wide range right now.

Brian:     The last question that I love to ask is, what's one piece of advice that you would offer?

Aaron:   Andrew's the professor so I'll let him take this one

Brian:     Profess to us Andrew.

Andrew:                That's another really big, tough question. I guess if, I know this is kind of a cliché, but just taking risks. I think a lot of the real fun that's come out of the recording process, working with Aaron and just really any musical endeavor I've taken, has been the uncertain ones that have gone it. There's never been anything really, that I've been super duper proud of, that came out of, "I'm doing this because I know this is safe."

                  I think it's just a matter of really just taking that sort of risk and seeing where it goes. Failing a ton, more often than not, and then just keep pushing and seeing where that leads. Everything is also connected as well. All the failure is connected to the positive stuff as well.

Brian:     That's true. You got to take those risks. For those folks who are interested in finding out more about you guys, where do they go if they want to follow you? What are the best places to find you guys?

Aaron:   You can find us pretty much everywhere. We've got our website, www.aarontinjum, or aarontinjumandthetangents.com, or on Facebook, Twitter, SoundCloud, Spotify, Itunes, Amazon, YouTube, Tinder.

Brian:     All those places.

Aaron:   Any of those places.

Brian:     Okay, got it. You got anything? I know you got some stuff over there. Andrew you got any places that if they want to follow you specifically?

Andrew:                Yeah, for sure. I'm on Twitter and Facebook as well. I have a website for those of you who are classical saxophone enthusiasts, I have an album coming out in the next couple of days of some of the chamber compositions that I have and that can be found at AndrewCodyMusic.com.