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Of Tomorrow

3/20/18 - Special Guest: Surprise Attack

Thanks to Ian, Jay, and Tom, of Surprise Attack, for hanging out with us in the studio this week!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. ***You and Me and Howard Cosell, by Quiet Life Motel (World, Jazz)

  2. M.D.M.A., by Surprise Attack (Funk, Jam)

  3. Petrified, by Chris Cassaday (Folk, Folk Rock)

  4. ***Come Up, by Jae Alexander (R&B)

  5. Dopener, by Of Tomorrow (Rock/Funk)

***The first time we've played this artist for you on the show, & a new artist profile added to our DC Artist Database! 

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


ANNOUNCEMENTS

We need your help supporting WERA 96.7FM, the station where the live version of our show airs!  Arlington County is planning to cut funding for the station by 20%, which would gut the station staff, drive up costs to the station’s community considerably, and potentially even cause the loss of the station itself.
https://www.arlingtonmedia.org/about/proposed-fy-19-county-budget-catastrophic-aim

The county board will vote on the proposed budget on April 21st. Here’s how we need your help before the vote:

1) If you live in Arlington, or know someone who does, forward them this link and sign our petition - Urging the County Board to restore AIM's funding. https://www.change.org/p/arlington-county-board-urge-the-arlington-county-board-to-act-to-restore-arlington-independent-media-s-funding

2) Share Your Feedback on Arlington's FY 2019 Proposed Budget - This county survey asks Arlington residents to give feedback on the proposed budget. Must be completed by April 9, 2018
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/FY19BudgetFeedback

3) Write your County Board members - countyboard@arlingtonva.us - Tell them you want AIM's funding restored!!  Sample letter here - https://www.arlingtonmedia.org/about/proposed-fy-19-county-budget-catastrophic-aim/sample-letter-county-board-stop-aim-budget-cuts

4) Speak with a County Board member at an Open Door Monday. Open to all Arlington residents.  No appointment is necessary to talk one-on-one with a County Board member on any topic. Mondays, 7 - 9PM, at locations around the Arlington. See schedule below:

Open Door Monday at Aurora Hills Library - Monday March 26th
Open Door Monday at Langston Brown Community Center - Monday, April 2nd
https://countyboard.arlingtonva.us/open-door-mondays/


NEW MUSIC RELEASES

Our 2018 New Releases by DC Artists’ Spotify Playlist:
https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/7kbMQzbrQPisoJq5A76V3k


NEW VIDEOS

Thievery Corporation - Voyage Libre
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JAOEo_sVRo0

Handsome Hounds Tiny Desk Video 2018
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBngpY9RwV4

Our ‘DC Artists Official Music Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70kU0_uB-sdviWajkbzi2Akr


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Check the calendar, linked below, for the full list!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Fri Mar 23
Human Country Jukebox @ Hill Country in Downtown DC

Sat Mar 24
Womxn Screw Stuff Up (Clean Words) Festival @ Songbyrd Music House in Admo
Split Seconds & Curse Words @ Milkboy Arthouse in MD

Sun Mar 25
Two Ton Twig @ Solly’s on U St

Wed Mar 28
Ardamus @ Milkboy Arthouse in College Park, MD


Patreon

Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **Music 4 The Revolution (Abu Jibran)**



Surprise Attack

Video - Bio - Links - Transcript

Surprise Attack's Bio:

SA Full Band.jpg

Drawing inspiration from across the musical spectrum to create their unique "Mountain Funk" sound, Surprise Attack thrives on collaboration and improvisation. The group’s five members share a deep connection and a passion for uncompromising, progressive music that keeps listeners guessing and always lands somewhere unexpectedly familiar.

Links:
Website
Facebook
Bandcamp
Instagram

Jay & Ian.JPG
surprise attack.jpg

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:     On DC Music Rocks, we're shining a spotlight on the great songs, artists, and incredible people behind the DC region's local music scene. And Surprise Attack pushes the envelope when it comes to seamlessly blending genres and improvisation. Their unexpectedly eclectic blend of funk, jazz, rock, roots music, and hip-hop, is something they often call Mountain Funk. Multi part harmonies, searing instrumental leads, dynamic rhythmic breaks, and nostalgic covers are only a few of the tools Surprise Attack uses to entertain and delight you when you come and see them.  This five piece group demonstrates a keen ability to reflect the energy of an audience back at them, and creating unique and unforgettable experiences. They're also great dudes. I came across these guys way back when I started the show, and I've been following them for two years ... two plus years, at this point, and I love all these releases. It is such a treat to now get to share you guys with everybody listening. Thanks for being here, guys.

Tom:     [crosstalk 00:00:57]. Thanks, Brian, yeah, it's great to be here.

Brian:     This is awesome. What is it that makes Surprise Attack special? I talked about the blend of the different genres of the Mountain Funk, and then there's also that ... I talked about the ... sending the energy back to the audience. What else? What makes you special?

Tom:     It's the friendship at the core. Really, we've been extremely close friends for a really long time. We're all odd. We're quirky. And I really think when we get together, we just ... we really click in a way that is special, and I think the music that we put out is a direct reflection of that.

Brian:     Absolutely. And if they haven't been to a Surprise Attack show, what's it like?

Jay:     We try to project fun. Fun is what we've got from a lot of people, so we try to read the crowd and sort of the venue, and try to cater the musical experience to that, because you don't want to just come up there with the same couple songs that you always do.

Brian:     Right.

Jay:     People might get bored of that really quickly, so we like to really ... Our name is Surprise Attack. We like to really [crosstalk 00:02:12].

Brian:     Surprise attack them?

Jay:     ... any idea of what's coming, so when you hear, it's supposed to give that feeling.

Brian:     That's awesome. So now, right along those lines then, when it comes to memorable moments where you surprise attacked someone, what comes to mind for the most successful moment for surprise attacking people?

Ian:     Well actually, recently we played ... What was the name of that bar we played?

Tom:     The Midlands?

Ian:     Yeah, the Midlands. And we went into ... Oh, sorry. And we went into Cali Love ... California Love, but Tupac.

Brian:     Stop it. Really?

Ian:     Yeah. That surprise attacked the hell out of everybody.

Brian:     I can only imagine. Wow. And knew all the words? Rapped to it?

Ian:     Yeah, the bartenders were all taking videos and everything. They loved it.

Brian:     That's awesome. What a cool thing. I love it.  And now, the story behind the name. Surprise Attack, where did that come from?

Tom:     Believe it or not, Surprise Attack formed a little over 10 years ago, the first time. We were a pop/punk sort of outfit.

Brian:     Really?

Tom:     Yeah, we were a pop/punk sort of outfit, so Surprise Attack was a great name for us then, and then we came back, we all loved jam music, and yeah, just the [segging 00:03:29] from one song to the other, the unexpected songs that come in and out of the sets. Surprise Attack just worked, and we've kept it ever since.

Brian:     Got it. The name was actually ... That was the name of the pop/punk group too?

Tom:     Yes.

Brian:     So, it's been Surprise Attack since the beginning.

Tom:     Yes.

Brian:     Wow. And how long of a break was it between when you stopped and came back?

Tom:     It was like eight, nine years after our pretty much permanent hiatus, that we all decided to move back to DC and then start playing music again.

Brian:     And when you say, "We all", describe all the members and the pieces of the band. What makes up Surprise Attack?

Ian:     Well, at first was me and Tom, the guitar ... Sorry, this is Ian on the drums and Tom the guitar player, and then we had [Gerry 00:04:13] on the keys and Danny on the base, originally. That was when we were in high school. Then once we split up, got back together, and [Jayro 00:04:23], the percussion player joined the band, and that's been over a year now.

Jay:     Yeah, it was kind of ... I knew all these guys back then too, as well, but we all ended up going to different colleges, and so we were spread out.

Brian:     Oh, of course.

Ian:     Except for Tom and I. We both went to Virginia Tech, and that's where ... I had my electronic drum kit there that I could make work in the townhouse that I had. Then Tom would come over and jam, so that's kind of how me and him started musically collaborating. Once we all sort of moved back to this area, after the college period kind of, then got back into it.

Brian:     You described ... I hear six people. Yeah? There's six?

Tom:     There's five of us.

Brian:     Five of us. Got it. And the instrumentation is two drums ... What is it? Tell me the rest.

Tom:     We've got the standard traditional drum kit. We got Jayro who plays percussion, like [tongos 00:05:25], bongos, all sorts of random fun loud-making stuff.

Brian:     Okay.

Tom:     Guitar. We got keyboards, and we've got base.

Brian:     And base. What a great ... And that means you can play any cover too, because you've got all the instruments you need to do that. Oh man, guys, that's fun.  What about ... Outside of the music thing in your personal time, I want you guys to each share. What do you do for fun? Outside of that.

Ian:     Well actually, coincidentally, I started doing music lessons. I know this is music related, but that's actually what I do for my job now.

Brian:     Really? What kind of ... so you teach lessons?

Ian:     I teach drums, guitar and piano.

Brian:     Where is that? Where do you do that?

Ian:     It's at a place called Bach to Rock.

Brian:     Nice.

Ian:     Yeah. Teaching kind of from six to 13 or so. Younger kids.

Brian:     Very cool.

Ian:     Yeah. It's a lot of fun.

Brian:     Teaching music lessons.

Ian:     Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Jay:     This guy can play everything, man.

Brian:     Everything drums, or everything ...

Jay:     Like everything.

Brian:     [crosstalk 00:06:29], like whatever you want. Wow, man. That's amazing.

Ian:     All the rock instruments.

Brian:     Awesome. And what else? About the rest of you?

Tom:     This is Tom, and I'm a huge yoga advocate. That's probably-

Brian:     Really?

Tom:     ... the thing that eats up the most of my time outside of the band.

Brian:     Now, when you say, "Huge", does that mean daily, twice daily?

Tom:     Not twice daily. It's definitely a daily thing for me. Sometimes more than others, but it's just been a huge part of my life for the past four or five years. It really keeps me grounded.

Brian:     Grounded is such a good yoga word, that they use. [crosstalk 00:07:02] associated with it. Do you go to a studio to do this, or do you teach it, or do you just do it at home, or what?

Tom:     There's a ton of great studios around Arlington, Virginia. Everywhere in northern Virginia and DC has them. I'll do stuff at home. I'll do stuff at studios. I like experimenting. Doing with a community is nice, and then practicing on my own can be nice too sometimes.

Brian:     Very cool.

Jay:     And this is Jay, and I started skateboarding at six years old and used to do it competitively. I don't do it as much anymore. I'm kind of a big guy to be skating. It hurts when I fall.

Brian:     Now, when you say a big guy, if they don't know how big you are ...

Jay:     Well, I'm 6'4" and weigh about 200 pounds.

Brian:     Got it. Yeah, that is pretty tall for skateboarding. You're right.

Ian:     Everybody in this band is really tall, except for me. Everybody is six feet and above, and I'm standing here over here, 5'9".

Brian:     So Ian, the 5'9" under the giants.

Ian:     Yeah, exactly.

Brian:     Oh god, that's amazing.

Jay:     But yeah. I don't do it as much anymore, but I still get out there a lot, and still try to do some crazy stuff from time to time.

Brian:     Nice. I like it, guys. One of my favorite questions to ask, and I want each of you to answer it is, if you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be?

Ian:     To other bands, or ...

Brian:     I'm going to leave it entirely up to you.

Ian:     Oh, okay.

Brian:     It's just your piece of advice to whoever.

Jay:     Listen to Surprise Attack.

Tom:     This is why we put Jay [crosstalk 00:08:28].

Brian:     That was Jay, and Jay, you still got to come up with something else. But we do love that advice. I do. I do.

Ian:     That's just good advice for life, in general. Listen to Surprise Attack.

Brian:     Absolutely. I would say, "And then go to a show and be surprised and attacked." There's that too. Go ahead, Ian, what do you got?

Ian:     Well, I guess for bands in the area starting up and stuff, just going to a bunch of different shows and supporting local music and stuff is definitely ... definitely was a big help for us, as far as just making friends and also seeing different styles and stuff like that. Listen to as many people as you can, I would say.

Brian:     Awesome. That's cool. What about you, Tom?

Tom:     I got to say, just in general, do your do.

Brian:     Do your do. It sounds like a Mountain Dew commercial.

Tom:     It's not a Mountain Dew commercial. There's a lot of things that we're told that we can't do, we shouldn't do, things that are just a bad idea for us to go down. In particular, as a musician, that one really strikes home for me. Really, just if you've got the passion to do something, absolutely go for it, and give it everything you've got.

Brian:     Absolutely.

Ian:     I like that.

Brian:     I like that one. Absolutely. All right, Jay. Your second shot. More advice. I was only asking for one, but you're allowed two.

Jay:     Drink a lot coffee, so that it can support you to ... As a musician and everything, it's ... As you're coming up and trying to really make it work, you still got other things in your life you try to balance and get everything together, but just every time that I'm ... just kind of notice I'm sitting around and doing nothing, I just kind of have the realization, and just try to stay energetic, and stay on the path towards achieving whatever I've set out to achieve. I just try to have a lot of energy when it comes to that, just so that I can achieve kind of a good balance with my goals and living life.

Brian:     Absolutely. When you have those moments, take advantage of them and do the stuff that's important, not just [inaudible 00:10:44]. I like that. I like that.  Cool. And for those folks who want to find out more about Surprise Attack, where do they go?

Tom:     SurpriseAttackDC.com is the definite place to get any and all Surprise Attack information. Looking us up on Facebook also. There's a ton of information, and all of our music is available for free for download; Band Camp, SoundCloud, Spotify, iTunes.

Brian:     That's amazing. All right. And is there one social media that you guys do more on than the others?

Ian:     Probably Facebook, at this point, but we're getting more involved with Instagram and stuff. We've been thinking about getting a Twitter, but ...

Brian:     Facebook and Instagram

 

8/08/17 - Special Guest: Josh Brick - Concert Photographer

Thanks Josh Brick, DC Concert Photographer, for coming by the studio this week!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might take time to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcherPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

FROM TODAY'S SHOW

MUSIC

  1. Fine Line by Humble Fire (Indie/Dream Pop) 
  2. I Wish by Nappy Riddem (Funk) 
  3. Better Batter by Moogatu (Hard Rock/Funk)
  4. No Shackles and Chains by Ras Slick (Reggae) 
  5. Involved by Rent Party (Rock/Blues Rock)
  6. Basslove Pt II by Of Tomorrow (Rock/Funk)

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-

ANNOUNCEMENTS

The Hip Hop Genre playlist is up!  Hope you’ll check out these incredible artists, and follow the playlist, we’ll keep adding great hip hop as we find more great tracks.

https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/2nGYsSdOxZPszjDTy49Tgp

NEW RELEASES

Sub-Radio - Was It Good For You (Single)
Surprise Attack - First (4 Song EP)
Christos DC - Tessera (12 Song album)
The Cowards Choir - I Took A Drive (Single)
Humble Fire - Builder (7 Song EP)

THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE 

There's so many!  Visit our Local Music Calendar to see the full list!  These are just the few we discussed on the show to get you started.

Fri Aug 11
Humble Fire & Near Northeast @ Rock & Roll Hotel on H Street NE, DC
Oh He Dead, Two Ton Twig, Soldiers of Suburbia & Justin Trawick @ 9:30 Club on U Street, DC

Sat Aug 12
His Dream Of Lions @ Workhouse Brewfest in Lorton, VA

Sun Aug 13
Rare Essence @ MGM National Harbor in National Harbor, MD
Braddock Station Garrison @ Iota Club & Cafe in Arlington, VA

Tues Aug 15
Luke James Shaffer @ Songbyrd Music House in Adams Morgan, DC
Lisa Said & Olivia Mancini @ The Black Cat on 14th St NW, DC

Wed Aug 16
Human Country Jukebox @ Madam’s Organ in Adams Morgan, DC



JOSH BRICK GRAPHICS

VIDEO - BIO - LINKS - TRANSCRIPT

BIO:

Josh Brick DC Music Rocks

I am an experienced graphic designer and photographer. Thank you for visiting my online portfolio. I have been in the graphic design field for eight years professionally. I earned a degree in Media Arts and Design from James Madison University in 2006 with a focus on print journalism. My design focuses on page layout and typography. I aim for clean designs that provide easy readabillity and engagement. 

Photography has always been one of my interests and I continue to develop my skills in that field. I have been able to combine my love of music and photographs by building a collection of extensive concert captures. In addition to concert photography, I also have experience in weddings, engagement photos, landscapes and portraits.

Links

Website www.joshbrickgraphics.com

Facebook https://www.facebook.com/joshbrickgraphics/

Twitter  https://twitter.com/brickjp

Instagram https://www.instagram.com/joshbrickgraphics/

Josh Brick

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:     On DC Music Rocks, we're shining a spotlight on the great songs and incredible people behind the DC region's local music scene. Josh Brick is a local DMV area photographer with a focus on live music. He's been active since early 2013 and has been building a reputation since then as a supporter of the DC music scene. He's an experienced graphic designer and photographer. He earned a degree in media arts and design from James Madison University in 2006, with a focus on print journalism. Photography has always been one of his interests and he has been able to combine his love of music and photographs by building a collection of extensive concert captures.

    In addition to concert photography, he also has experience with of course weddings, engagement photos, landscapes and portraits. The man is a photographer of all things. He loves the live music though. I've been following his work for several years now. It just, great. I appreciate all those good concert photos, especially from some of the other local bands. A lot of the bands know this guy. It's a treat to actually get to share him with you now, because he's the man behind the scene, that doesn't get the spotlight. I love we're giving you the spotlight now, man. Josh, thanks for being here.

Josh:     Thank you. I very much appreciate it and excited to be here.

Brian:     Absolutely. Now, talk about how did you get into photography? Where did that start?

Josh:     It was always an interest of mine back in high school and in college, but I just never, it was basically just a hobby. I never had real equipment or basically a DSLR camera. As I mentioned before, I was given one as a gift and then it just took off from there. I've been going to shows since I can remember, and then I just thought that well, when I see something that's incredible, I thought I have to document this. I have to show people. If you say to someone, "Hey. I went to a great show last night." They don't really think anything of that. If you share with them a photo and say, "Hey check this out. Look at this." In an instant they can get a much better appreciation for what the event was like.

Brian:     That's so true. At what point did you decide that you wanted to do, continue to do more and more with this. A lot of people have passions for photography but for you, you've kind of taken it to another level. There is a social media presence and a website.

Josh:     Yeah at first I didn't decide, okay I'm going to be a concert photographer. It just, I got the bug and I just was going to see shows and I just at that point my goal was just to keep shooting more shows and to see as much music as I could. Then, after I don't know six months to a year, it started building and I thought, okay this could actually be something. That was kind of the beginning of it I guess. It was really the love for music first, and then kind of joining the photography with it. It's been great.

Brian:     Oh man. Well, I love that you discovered it and I love that you stuck with it. It's if you go back in time and you look back in history at the shots you've done. I can also see the progression of you as a photographer, which has also been amazing to see how it's evolved man.

Josh:     Thank you.

Brian:     What's your DC region connection? It said James Madison University in the bio. You're from here? How did you get to DC?

Josh:     Grew up in Springfield, Virginia.

Brian:     Get out of here, yeah? Springfield, alright.

Josh:     Robert E. Lee High School and Springfield Mall back in the day. I'm still here.

Brian:     Yeah. Fantastic. Where are you now? What part of the city?

Josh:     I am right down the street from this studio actually in Arlington, so near Courthouse.

Brian:     Fantastic.

Josh:     It's a great place to be.

Brian:     Absolutely. Now, when you're going all over the city then. Do you tend to concentrate more on Arlington shows? Talk about the different venues and the different places you go.

Josh:     Sure. I definitely have an interest in local music and nationally touring acts.

Brian:     Sure.

Josh:     I just, if something strikes me, if I think a band is good and it's great music, then I'll follow that. Nothing else really comes in to play. It's always about the music first. Over the years, I've just been able to build relationships with local venues. As I've mentioned before, Gypsie Sally's is one of my favorite clubs, since that opened almost four years ago. It's kind of the same time I was starting, is when that club opened.

Brian:     Yeah.

Josh:     I'm there all the time. Also, I frequent The Hamilton downtown, which is, they have phenomenal acts there. That's just a great room for music, state of the art, stage projection and sound. Other places like Iota just down the street from here. It's a blessing to be able to essentially walk from my apartment over and catch a show whenever I want.

Brian:     Right.

Josh:     I can't complain about that.

Brian:     That's amazing man. It's been a treat. It really looks like you've kind of shot just about every club in the scene pretty much.

Josh:     Yeah, mostly. There's still some I need to get.

Brian:     Do you have like a bucket list of places you haven't been yet?

Josh:     Definitely, you mean in DC?

Brian:     Yeah. Venues you haven't shot yet?

Josh:     Probably. I mean, I've shot 930 Club a bunch and that is an experience that's kind of different than a smaller club.

Brian:     How so?

Josh:     Well, it's just everything is bigger, better, louder, pretty much.

Brian:     Sounds like a tag line for a venue, bigger, better, louder. Yep, that's a 930 Club t-shirt right there. You heard it here first guys. That's amazing.

Josh:     Bigger, better, louder. When you shoot artists there, they really look like rock stars. It just looks like just with the lights and the state and the fog and whatnot, when you take a shot there, it's like okay. I can really make this band look good.

Brian:     Wow. That's cool. Alright. What about you on the personal side? You do a lot of photography. When you get away from that, what else is there to Josh?

Josh:     Well, there's a lot of photography like you said. You know, I grew up doing graphic design, which is what a part of my profession, which I was able to basically combine those two things because at the end of the day, photos are graphics. I'm able to kind of play with that in terms of marketing and things like that, and pushing out music that I love. Other than that, I mean I'm just essentially a music fan at my core. That's what started it all is just I love music. I love finding other people that love music. If there's that bond, then we can really get along.

Brian:     That's cool. Now, you can't get away that easy. Are you a Netflix guy? Are you a gym rat? Are you, everybody seems to have little things. Are you a member of a book club?

Josh:     I am not. I am not a member of a book club. There are other things. I mean, I'm obsessed with basketball and tennis as well.

Brian:     Really?

Josh:     Those are sports I'm dedicated-

Brian:     You mean go watch them, go play them?

Josh:     Watch them, play them, just everything about those two sports gets me going every time. I played tennis in high school and my dad taught me how to play basketball as a kid. I just keep that going and so that's kind of a good escape from always being behind the lens.

Brian:     Yeah. Absolutely.

Josh:     I will say that one of my dreams is I love to shoot sports photography as well, whether it be the Washington Wizards for example.

Brian:     Oh Wizards? A Wizard photographer.

Josh:     I want to have that job.

Brian:     Being a Wizards fan is sometimes a thankless thing.

Josh:     We've suffered for years.

Brian:     Have you been a fan for years I take it?

Josh:     Since the Bullet days.

Brian:     No way. All the way back?

Josh:     All the way back.

Brian:     Oh man, we're going back. I love it. Cool. Alright, now, talk about memories you have in the scene. Are there moments that stick out in your photography time that are more memorable than others? What sticks out to you?

Josh:     Oh absolutely. For example, the first time that I was actually compensated for shooting[inaudible 00:08:36].

Brian:     That would be a success moment.

Josh:     That was, I got to give a shout out to Soul Rooots who's a great local guitar player and singer.

Brian:     Yeah, yes. We jam to him. Yeah.

Josh:     It literally was that first connection. I don't remember how it happened, but he reached out. He was playing the State Theater. It was a pretty big gig. He was opening for Shamika Copeland actually, I think. Anyway, I've had that. I've been friends with him ever since. I mean, I've supported him and his music and he still will call me up, any given day and say "Hey can you come shoot this gig?" That was definitely a memory that kind of boosted it all is that I got paid for work.

Brian:     Nice. You got paid for one. What ever memories come to mind?

Josh:     Well, one that was pretty recent was over, maybe about a month ago, the final Iota jam.

Brian:     Oh.

Josh:     Which was-

Brian:     For those people who don't know what you mean when you say final Iota jam, what is that mean?

Josh:     I guess a little over a year ago, Gordon Sterling and Sean Godfrey, Gordon being [inaudible 00:09:47], Sean has his own studio, Blue Hippo Recordings in Centerville. They decided that they were going to start a jam. It's been done before.

Brian:     Right.

Josh:     There was something different about the way they did it. They had exactly a one year run at Iota, every single Tuesday, and out of 52 weeks, they only missed one week. They did 51 out of 52 weeks straight basically. The final one occurred last month sometime and it was just a huge blowout. I mean, I think Sean said there was 300 people. It was a Tuesday night.

Brian:     A Tuesday night.

Josh:     Tuesday night.

Brian:     Wow.

Josh:     It was packed.

Brian:     What a crowd.

Josh:     That was definitely an unforgettable night for many people in many different ways. It was emotional. It was fun. Everybody was happy and it was fantastic.

Brian:     That's awesome. Now, what about, okay. The one question that I always love to ask in all my interviews is, if you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be?

Josh:     Oh that's a great question. I mean, I would say that you need to. The piece of advice that I would give is that to respect your craft and to respect your colleagues. If you do those things, you're probably have a good shot at success, because I mean the craft, whether, I'm a photographer but there's musicians. I can tell when they respect their craft, when they're true.

Brian:     What do you mean when you say respect their craft? What do you mean?

Josh:     Just basically become completely immersed in what you're doing. For me, I'm not playing instruments. I'm taking a photo. I didn't do it just to do it. I did it because I was drawn to it and it basically chose me at that point. I surrendered to the pull of needing to see live music and document it. When I see certain musicians and I watch them play and I watch them pour their hearts out. I can tell, this is a true musician. I think, it goes for everything. That's respect your craft. Respect your colleagues. I mean, to me, music isn't a competition. That's what gets lost a lot of times because bands want to make it. You want whatever that means. I don't even know. If you support your colleagues, then that's going to help you along the way. There's definitely other photographers that I love and respect and so I try to show that all the time.

Brian:     Wow. I appreciate that. That's some profound advice. I like that Josh. Alright. For those folks who want to find out more about you and follow what you're doing, where do they go?

Josh:     Facebook would be Josh Brick Graphics, three words, pretty simple. Instagram I'm Josh Brick Graphics, same thing. Also, www.joshbrickgraphics.com.

Brian:     Whoa.

Josh:     I'm also on Twitter @brickjp, B-R-I-C-K-J-P. There's plenty of ways to find me.

Brian:     There it is, plenty of ways. Is there one that some people prefer Instagram or Facebook or Twitter? Do you lean one way or the other?

Josh:     I mean, I'm pretty much Instagram and Facebook are probably my two favorite. Just reach out to me. I can provide any photo from the archive that you might be interested in.

Brian:     Nice. Archives. You've got access to the archives listeners. That's amazing.

February 21, 2017 - Special Guests: Geoff Browning and Jon Modell from “Of Tomorrow”

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FROM TODAY'S SHOW

NEWS

Washington City Paper's Best of DC Poll is out.  Go vote for your favorite local original band.  We've got 170+ Profiles of deserving bands on our Find-Browse Music page

MUSIC

  1. Live By The Sword - Lanternfish (Rock/Noise Rock) Album Release Show 2/25 @ DC9!  
  2. Drunk On The Power - Holly Montgomery (Rock/Adult Contemporary)
  3. The March - Of Tomorrow (Rock/Funk)
  4. That's Love - Oddisee (Hip Hop/Rap)
  5. Insight - Fort Knox Five, Asheru (Funk)
  6. I Love You Madly - Black Masala (Funk/Brass)
  7. Intro/Outro music by Fellowcraft (Hard Rock/Blues)

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-



Of Tomorrow

Geoff Browning & Jon Modell

Video - Bio - Photos - Links

Bio

DC Music Rocks Of Tomorrow

At the core, Of Tomorrow’s music is authentic, technical and diverse – touching on the sounds of funk, Latin jazz, festival rock, samba, neo-soul, and hip-hop. Formed in late 2015, the band is comprised of core members Nick Soderstrom (bass), Jon Modell (drums) and Geoff Browning (guitar / vocals)--fixtures on the DC music scene who have toured extensively, performing at sold-out venues including DC's 9:30 Club and the All Good Music Festival. Together, these three form the rich backbeat, melodies and lyrical structure for other players to texture, improvise and compose over.

On a mission to energize its fans and empower both core and guest musicians to shine, of Tomorrow has released their self-titled album and continues to write, tour and record. They have performed with John Popper or Blues Traveler and regularly collaborate with Ralph Washington and DJ Unown of Oddisee and Good Compny, the Yellow Dubmarine horns, and a long list of well know, extremely talented regional players. Appearing in dozens of cities and festival venues this Summer, of Tomorrow is not a band you want to miss. Tomorrow is yours.

DC Music Rocks Of Tomorrow (2)
DC Music Rocks Of Tomorrow (3)
 

Interview Transcript

Brian:     That was Of Tomorrow, my guest for today and that was the track The March.

Goeff:         Yes it was.

Brian:     At the core, Of Tomorrow's music is authentic, technical, and diverse, touching on the sounds of funk, Latin, jazz, festival rock, Samba, neo soul, and hip hop. They bring it all together. They were formed in late 2015 and the band's comprised of their core members: Nick, Jon, and Geoff. Together these three formed the rich back beat melodies and lyrical structure for other players to texture, improvise, and compose over. Of Tomorrow's release, their self-titled album and continue to write, tour, and record all around the region.

                  I've known these guys and I've seen these guys around the scene for years and listeners, it is with great pleasure that I introduce Geoff and Jon from Of Tomorrow.

Geoff:         Hello, world.

Brian:     Say hi, fellas.

Jon:         What's up, guys? How's it going?

Brian:     It is such a treat having you hear. Now talk to us about where ... How Of Tomorrow came together. How did that happen?

Geoff:         Well, I played in a band around D.C. for a long. That's where I met Jon. Jon's actually toured pretty extensively and played with a lot of folks. Bands sometimes go the way of the dinosaurs. It's part of the industry, I suppose.

Brian:     True. All right.

Geoff:         I had recently left one project and I ran into Jon at this amazing meeting of the minds jam session out in Virginia and told him the story and he said, "Oh, well, actually that's interesting because I have a new project coming together with this bass player I met who is amazing." And Nick is amazing. He said, "We have a show next Friday. Would you like to play with us?"

                  I said, "Yes," and we practiced for about 30 minutes for a four-hour set and we had so much fun we said, "Wow, we should actually start writing songs and bringing in more people who we know, who are talented in the scene, teaching them the songs, and aggressively booking shows." It came together from there.

Brian:     That's amazing. Jon, I want to switch over to you. Where did music come into your life? Geoff just said that you've been playing for a while. Talk about that a bit.

Jon:         Yeah, I started beating on pots and pans as a baby. My mom really was all about that.

Brian:     Beating on pots and pans?

Jon:         Yeah.

Brian:     Yes!

Jon:         She just encouraged me to hit all kinds of stuff in the house and make sounds.

Brian:     All right.

Jon:         I had a little record player with five or six records. This Fisher-Price thing I'll never forget. I just loved music from the beginning, but I took some Suzuki piano early on. I just really didn't have that much interest in studying music until I saw a couple of local players around my early teen years. Like when I was 14, I saw this great jazz drummer and I went up to her ... Her name was Roberta Washington and asked her to give me lessons. Same with the pianist. Walked up to him and asked him to give me lessons. It came into my life that way.

Brian:     Whoa, so both piano and drums then?

Jon:         Yeah, and at the same time I was going to school at [Maret 00:03:04] in D.C. and me and a couple of guys there formed a punk band. We played a lot of Bad Brains covers and whatever.

Brian:     Nice.

Jon:         We eventually hooked up with a singer. Amanda [Makki 00:03:15] actually. Don Z was just in here. I played around the D.C. punk scene and in a hip hop band called 3LG back in the day. I came into music really playing a lot of different styles.

Brian:     Sure.

Jon:         I didn't really care. I loved hip hop. I loved early rap. I loved early electronic music. I loved jazz and I studied 'em all and have been looking for a band that I could just be me, which means I could do a lot of things, which is the impetus for forming this group for me.

Brian:     Yeah.

Jon:         In its early inception was just to really be a place that music's music and I think people are smart enough and open enough out there now to be able to love just good music.

Brian:     What about you, Geoff? How does music enter your life? What's that story there?

Geoff:         Well, I think everything I ever wanted in a band including things I didn't know I wanted, I've found in this band, but it was a long journey to get there.

Brian:     It sounds like the beginning of a sweet love story. It's such a sweet love story.

Geoff:         It is. It is.

Brian:     Tell us more.

Geoff:         Okay, so my grandfather was a musician. He actually played during World War II in the marine corps band. His band was actually weaponized and turned into a fighting unit. The whole band was shipped to the Pacific. It's a pretty crazy story. There's actually a lot of military history that's been written about it, but ...

Jon:         I was just going to say I really hope that doesn't happen to us.

Geoff:         I hope that doesn't happen to us. Not out of the question in these crazy times, Jon.

Jon:         I'm not looking forward to being weaponized.

Geoff:         Yeah. So he was a musician. My mother was a music teacher so growing up we had a big roomful of random noisemakers to play around with and she ... I always wanted to play guitar. She said that she played guitar. She was a music teacher from when I was negative nine months old all the way through birth so I listened to a lot of guitar in that period. My brain's wired around it.

Brian:     Okay, so guitar's your thing.

Geoff:         Yeah, so I picked that up until I was about 18. Wanted to be a professional musician. Got cold feet. Wandered around for a year. Wasn't sure what to do. Then found political passions and spent the better part of 10 years exclusively pursuing that passion using skillsets that actually aren't overall dissimilar to music in some ways like you and I talked about earlier. Now for the first time as an adult, I'm doing both.

Brian:     Wow, which makes for a pretty busy schedule, I would imagine.

Geoff:         Yeah, it's not good for things like sleep, but it is very good for overall having a balanced life where I do things I'm passionate about. Sometimes it's been very trying. Lately, especially, but the band has really been a great outlet.

Brian:     That's cool. Now you guys had said there was a start ... We just played that song, The March, from a ... There's a video that I'll post with the episode of these guys ... They did a live broadcast from a recording studio and it's just an amazing video and a lot of fun to watch the dynamics of everything that is happening. Tell us about that.

Jon:         Can I actually just tell a little bit about the musical side of it before, Geoff, you tell a little bit about the lyrical side of it?

Geoff:         Oh, please do. Absolutely. Yeah.

Jon:         Because that song represents what you read out of the bio, for me. It started as a formed bass drum/guitar back beat and then we brought two keyboardists and a trumpet player who aren't the core members of our band to come in and compose over it. The result is what I think, when you play that song back to back with others songs, I listen to, I'm really proud that it sounds fresh and it sounds different and it doesn't sound intentionally different because it's not.

                  What it is is just grabbing people from all different areas and saying, "You're not committed to performing some certain genre or certain sound. We've got the bass drums and guitar covered. You be you and we're going to come up with something we have no idea what it's going to be," and that's what The March ... And that's what that recording [crosstalk 00:07:08].

Brian:     And what we heard, was that really ... They had never played that with you before or they knew the basics?

Jon:         No, they've come up with it. They've helped us come up with that song, but not every note is supposed to be plotted out.

Brian:     Yeah.

Geoff:         Essentially the way that things have gone recently is we took a book out of the playbook of Everyone Orchestra who's a band who are good friends of ours from by Matt Butler out of Portland, Oregon. He invites people who he knows who are really talented to come and play with them. Well, Jon, Nick, and I write a lot of the songs and the songs have really ... We would like to think strong structures, lyrical content, things like that, but then we invite keyboard players and horn players and violin and rappers and anyone we want to come in over it. As a result, the result is always really creative and fresh and inspiring, at least to me.

                  With that particular song, the lyrical content's interesting. When we're not touring around, I live on Capitol Hill, about two blocks from the U.S. Capitol. I was walking on the plaza one day and there was this big rally going on behind the Capitol and everyone was singing, "Corporations aren't people." I started walking away and in my head I started thinking like, "[humming]."

                  The first two lyrics there are, "Corporations aren't people," but then the third time I say, "Corporations are made of people," because the thing about it is corporations ... It was interesting to hear that protest say that because they were frustrated with corporate personhood, obviously, but at the end of the day, corporations are made of people. They're just other people who are really good at exercising their political leverage very effectively. I think especially for our friends who care about things like economic fairness and basic rights, I think it's important to maintain that distinction and not see the other side in such monolithic adversarial terms in a way that is exculpatory and satisfying at times.

Brian:     Yeah, Jon, I'm curious now ...

Jon:         Those are big words.

Brian:     I was going to say those are amazingly big beautiful words and you just earn sexy points on the radio when you start talking big words like that.

Jon:         I hope I'm exculpatory at times.

Geoff:         I have the best words. All the best words.

Jon:         I think Exculpatory At Times is a good song title for something coming up. I'll have to find out what it means.

Brian:     Stay tuned for something like that. Jon, it sounds like ... Is it the same ... Clearly Geoff, brings a lot of political perspective and current events and stuff happening on the Hill. What do you bring to Of Tomorrow outside of ... Is it just the music for you or [crosstalk 00:09:39]?

Jon:         So really, when I met Nick at a jam session, I was playing in another local group, Nappy Riddem, great reggae band.

Geoff:         They're awesome.

Jon:         I had been with them for three and a half years, but when I met Nick ... As a drummer, you meet a bass player. His versatility and what it brought out of me made me think, "Wow, as a back beat, as the backbone of a band, we could enable amazing things to happen." I really created this in my mind, what I created, was a place that people could express themselves on top of and with the support of drums and bass that can pretty much do whatever is called for.

Brian:     That's amazing.

Jon:         When Geoff brings this passion and lyrical content to the song, that's exactly what my mission is, is not to control or say, "Hey, you come here and play this guitar or you come here and say these things," but to see him or anyone come in and really be enabled to make something that is really true to them, but also musically technically versatile and beautiful. That for me is the mission. I'm not the singer so I'm not about to tell you what to sing.

Brian:     Right. What about now outside of the music part now? Geoff, it sounds like a lot of your life is captured in political persuasion and such. Outside of work and outside of the work part, what's life like for you guys? Are you homebodies? What do you do in your downtime?

Geoff:         Every single second of downtime I have when I'm not sleeping, I'm generally mustering up all the energy I can to do things that are related to this band and its development.

Jon:         Getting a band to be actually playing out and have shows and get records done and all that ... As anyone out there knows, everyone knows, it takes an immense amount of work and Geoff definitely does an incredible amount of work.

Geoff:         Jon helps a lot. The thing is, you know, in some senses starting any new initiative and getting it off the ground, it can be ... It's sort of like a political campaign in a way. Running a band can be like a political campaign just with no election day, which can be exhausting. One difference is instead of having a VAN database where you have hundreds of thousands of voters and you put together root packets and send volunteers out to talk to them, you have a spreadsheet where you have 200 venues, festivals, and breweries and you basically need to look up contact or hire someone to go through that and look up contact information and do all the outreach.

For us, who's a band who does a lot of that ourselves, we don't quite have the volume yet to get a big production house but we've had a really amazing group of people who've really latched on to what we're doing and contributed their enthusiasm.

                  For anyone who's interested, I would definitely recommend they go to DCMusicRocks.com or to BandOfTomorrow.com and see the videos that we've had. We shot those at this big warehouse party in D.C. at a art space. It was this amazing night and we invested a lot in the video crew and we had Da Vinci Sound and Vision out to record it and [AudioBar 00:12:46] came out and [Pat Chen 00:12:48], [Sean Gokin 00:12:48]. It was great. Everyone walked away really excited, almost feeling like, "This must have been ..." I hear someone walk away and say, "This must have been what it was like to be in Haight-Ashbury in the 60's." That same kind of ... It was two weeks after the election. The whole art scene came together around it. People just had a lot of raw energy and in our song Order of the Red Banner, which is also on our website and social media channels, a lot of that came out in that as well.

Brian:     Check that out. Now what are you guys ... Talk to me about exciting things coming up for Of Tomorrow.

Jon:         Can I speak to that just for a second?

Brian:     By all means. Jump in.

Jon:         Because I think the D.C. music scene has something special, as that we're in D.C. and having grown up here and been in the underground scene and the art scene, there are certain parts of the scene here that are totally disconnected from what people think of Washington monuments, politics, all that. It's just people expressing themselves, making art. There's another part of the scene, which is very, very politically active. That was represented always by a lot of charity shows and Positive Force and groups that combine music with political action.

                  That's what makes this place special, but it's important in and out of the area to recognize, there's always been a part of the scene that's just about the music, just art.

Brian:     And the scene is wonderful for that in terms of being very supportive and I love that about the D.C. music scene, which is one of the reasons I love this show and we do this.

Jon:         We have a really good thing here. It's great. And it's growing too. It's awesome to see it grow.

Brian:     I want you to tell ... Well, first I want you to say if they're interested in finding out more about you guys, where do they find you guys online or to follow you guys?

Geoff:         BandOfTomorrow.com.

Brian:     Got it. It's all there?

Geoff:         Or @bandoftomorrow on Instagram, but BandOfTomorrow.com, actually our new album is up for free, just for an email address.

Brian:     Check it out.

Geoff:         There's also a link there to our very good friends at Void Life Records, who if you are willing to pay $8.88, they will send you a physical copy of the CD with one-of-a-kind drawings on the envelope and handwritten thank you note because they are amazing.

Jon:         Wow, those guys are super cool.

Brian:     That's amazing.

Geoff:         That's all at BandOfTomorrow.com.

Jon:         Talk about grassroots.

Brian:     I want you guys to speak to ... I'm going to put this little clip on because you said there's a DJ Unown. Is that what you said?

Geoff:         Yeah, [crosstalk 00:15:10] good company.

Brian:     Talk about this. Hold on. Let's listen for just a second here. Listen to what's happening in this audio clip here.

Geoff:         From the song we just heard, that sample ...

Brian:     It sounds like noise.

Jon:         Oh, put it back up for a second. He just deconstructs it the beginning and turns it into ...

Geoff:         And turns it into this.

Jon:         A crazy beat.

Geoff:         It's amazing.

Jon:         He did this at the show. He actually made this as we were playing.

Geoff:         It was that warehouse party I was talking about before.

Jon:         It was done when we were done. He just grabbed stuff out of the air and makes art. His name's actually Unown. Not really DJ Unown. He plays with Oddisee. He's their MPC sample player. He's extremely well known around here to anyone in the hip hop scene.

Brian:     Wow.

Geoff:         He basically came and he set up a microphone in the corner of the room and then when we were done, he went down and he plugged into a DI box on stage and he played back remixes of all the songs we had just played, none of which he had ever heard, using only samples that he recorded that night.

Jon:         Live.

Geoff:         He also plays with Oddisee, the rapper from D.C. who is about to go on a nine-month world tour making us all very, very proud and Ralph Real, who's our keyboard player is also going on tour with them.