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Menage A Garage

7/17/18 - Special Guest: Keith Berquist

This week on DC Music Rocks, Keith Berquist, marketer for dc music venues, stops by for a chat with host Brian Nelson-Palmer.

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Keith Berquist Bio:

Keith Berquist

Keith originally hails from the San Francisco bay area, where he interned at local concert promoters Another Planet Entertainment and Goldenvoice, working in marketing and ticketing respectively. In college, he interned at the Paradigm Agency’s Nashville office and built Vanderbilt University’s first ever campus recording studio. After graduation, Keith accepted a job as the Marketing Assistant for AEG Live – The Messina Group in Nashville, where he spent the next two years. He has spent the last two and a half years in Washington, DC working as the marketing manager for The Hamilton Live, where he handles marketing, publicity, and promotions for the venue and its shows.

Keith Berquist
Keith Berquist

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FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. ***Never Act Your Age, by M4TR (Rock, Hard Rock)

  2. Redlights, by allthebestkids (Hip Hop, Alt Hip Hop)

  3. Systematic Panic, by Ménage À Garage (Punk, Garage Rock)

  4. ***Right On, by Heartmeat (Indie, Folk)

  5. ***War, by Weird Babies (Punk, Punk Rock)

***The first time we've played this artist for you on the show, & a new artist profile added to our DC Artist Database!  There's new artists every week!

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


ANNOUNCEMENTS

--IT WAS OUR 2ND BIRTHDAY ON JULY 5TH!  In the last year we hit more than 9,000 followers, hosted our first 9:30 Club Festival, and had big name guests such as Ian MacKaye from Fugazi/Dischord Records.  None of this would have been possible without you guys listening! Thank you for following the show and allowing DC Music to be a part of your life! More to come, don’t go anywhere, we’re just getting started!

**************************************

LATEST 9:30 CLUB FESTIVAL (8/18) NEWS:

--THE SINGER-SONGWRITER NOMINATIONS ARE IN!
As of Mon evening that one facebook post had 937 comments, 122 shares and it reached more than 20,000 people!  WHOA! We’re tallying the results and should have the ballot out next week, so stay tuned! We love that you’re so involved in this!  
Nomination Post we’re referencing:  https://www.facebook.com/dcmusicrocks/photos/a.1765485153696349.1073741828.1758168324428032/2163360177242176/?type=3

--TWO MORE SPONSORS HAVE SIGNED ON!  Huge thanks to these guys for being involved in the local music scene and for helping spread the word about our festival!

  1. Chuck Levin’s Washington Music Center - Celebrating its 60th Anniversary as DC’s only full line musical instrument and equipment store. Started in 1958 and still family owned and operated, “Chuck’s” strives to be more than a store, but a resource for the DC music community.  http://www.chucklevins.com/

  2. District Karaoke - DC's only social, team-based karaoke league! You can form a team, join a team, or register as a free agent. You can also check out any of our open karaoke nights to learn more.  http://www.districtkaraoke.com

Have you bought your tickets yet?  Hundreds of tickets have already been sold, they’re only $15, go ahead and buy your tickets right now.  We’re having a party and we want you there!
https://www.facebook.com/events/197997380997173/


NEW RELEASES

Music

  • Feelfree - Define The Free
     (13 Song Reggae Album - RIYL SOJA, Citizen Cope, Slightly Stoopid)

  • Luke James Shaffer - Luke James Shaffer, Vol. 1
     (6 Song Indie EP - RIYL The Lumineers, Mumford & Sons, Zac Brown Band)

  • Milo in the Doldrums - Built For No One
     (4 Song Rock EP - RIYL Radiohead, Pavement, Nirvana)

  • The Duskwhales - Fight Back
     (Indie Single - RIYL The Beatles, The Doors, The Killers)

 

Videos

Our 2018 New Releases by DC Artists’ Spotify Playlist:
https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/7kbMQzbrQPisoJq5A76V3k

Our ‘DC Artists Official Music Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70kU0_uB-sdviWajkbzi2Akr


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Here’s just a few highlights for the coming week, be sure to check out the calendar for the full list of all the upcoming shows!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Jul 20 - Fri
Den-Mate & Two Inch Astronaut @ Black Cat in Washington, DC
19th Street Band @ The Hamilton Loft in Washington, DC

Jul 21 - Sat
Sub-Radio @ Occoquan Music on the Mill in Occoquan, VA
Randy Thompson Band @ Pearl Street Warehouse in Washington, DC
Edjacated Phools @ Gypsy Sally's in Washington, DC

Jul 23 - Mon
Caustic Casanova @ Atlas Brewing Works in Washington, DC

Jul 25 - Wed
Juliet Lloyd @ Lakefront Concert Series in Columbia, MD
The Sidleys @ Willow Garden Summer Concert Series in Bethesda, MD
Odetta Hartman @ Black Cat in Washington, DC

Jul 26 - Thu
Better Homes & In Your Memory @ MilkBoy ArtHouse in College Park, MD
The Grey A & Justin Trawick @ Union Stage in Washington, DC
Sara Curtin @ Jammin Java in Vienna, VA


Patreon

Do you like what we're doing?  Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **Music 4 The Revolution (Abu Jibran)**


We're Looking For Advertisers/Sponsors

We're looking for local businesses to sponsor us!  Know One?  Would you introduce us to them?

February 14, 2017 - Special Guest: Miles Ryan of 7DrumCity

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FROM TODAY'S SHOW

NEWS

THAT playlist - you read that right, for those moments when you're together with that someone special, it's THAT playlist!  DC artists have produced incredible music for just those types of love moments, and we're happy to have put them all together for you.  Check it out HERE, or on our Find-Browse Music Page!

MUSIC

  1. All Right - Carolyn Malachi (Jazz/R&B)
  2. Perfection - Kenny Sway (Pop/R&B)
  3. Favorite Girl - Aaron Abernathy (R&B/Soul)
  4. Set You Free - Aztec Sun (Funk/Soul)
  5. Sunflower Eyes - Lookout Gang (Rock/Soul)
  6. Freeze - Prinze George (Indie/Indie Electronic)
  7. You Get The Wiser - Menage a Garage (Punk/Punk Pop)
  8. Intro/Outro music by Fellowcraft (Hard Rock/Blues)

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-



Miles Ryan

Video - Bio - Photos - Links

Bio

DC Music Rocks Miles Ryan

7DrumCity is a music studio on North Capitol Street NW that offers drum lessons band practice space, and community events. The synergy of these things has created a hub and community space for musicians to meet, hang, learn, and even perform in a cozy environment. Our 100 drum students and several dozen core bands that practice here have created a thriving place to grow! 

DC Music Rocks Miles Ryan (3)

 

We just opened our new studio at 1506 North Capitol Street NW featuring 3 floors and a 2-story carriage house in the back. 3800 square feet, 9 rooms, and enough space to host a music festival. We grew from just 2 students in the owner Miles’ living room in 2011 to our beloved music studio on U street for 3 years, and as of January 31st, our new North Cap studio! Come see what it’s all about at our Grand Opening Festival on February 25th from 2-10pm, featuring 22 bands, art display, short films, giveaways, food, and beer. 

 

 

Links

Official Website: http://www.7drumlessons.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/7DrumCity/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/7DrumCity

Instagram: http://www.instagram.com/7drumcity

DC Music Rocks Miles Ryan (2)
 

Interview Transcript

Brian:     Miles Ryan is the creator and owner 7DrumCity. 7DrumCity, which opened in 2011, is a music studio on North Capitol Street Northwest that offers drum lessons, band practice space, and community events. It's become a hub for musicians to meet, hang, learn, and even perform in a cozy environment. Hosting more than a hundred drum students and several dozen core bands that practice at 7DrumCity regularly. They just opened their new studio at 1506 North Capitol Street, featuring three floors and a two story carriage house in the back. So it's 3,800 square feet total. Nine rooms in total and enough space to host a music festival.

                  So with that, listeners, I first met Miles through the Flash Band program and 7Drum, his studio ... I went and took lessons there, and I've gotten to know the guy. And I am so excited that I get to introduce him to you because he is such a cool member of the scene that it's a treat to have him on the show. So it's with great pleasure that I introduce Miles Ryan. Say hi man. Thanks for being here.

Miles:    It a treat to be here too. I [crosstalk 00:01:11] love you, just to get that out of the way.

Brian:     (Laughter) It is that special Valentines time of [crosstalk 00:01:15] the year so I love you too, man. Let's keep it going with the love. I love it. And speaking of love, you love drums. So how did 7DrumCity, or 7Drum Lessons ... It's had different names over the time, but how did this whole idea come about? How did it start?

Miles:    Well the idea ... Man, I thought this would be an easy question, but ... I originally just wanted to make some money on the side teaching drum lessons. I used to be in the solar energy industry and I was living in Boston. And I got laid off. And that was in May 2010. Around then I was hanging out with some entrepreneur friends and-

Brian:     Good friends, by the way. Entrepreneur friends are great friends to have.

Miles:    Yeah, good to hang out with those kind of people.

Brian:     Absolutely.

Miles:    But they were pretty influential for me. Also I was dating a woman who lived down here and she's a jazz singer. Another music entrepreneur herself.

Brian:     Awesome.

Miles:    Lena Seikaly(sp?), actually. But you should check out some of her music sometime.

Brian:     Okay.

Miles:    I came down to D.C. and then I basically started a website. Wanted to teach drum lessons. My friend Chris Williams, who went to Babson College, was sort of begging me for lessons. [crosstalk 00:02:43] And I was like, "All right, fine. I'll teach you a lesson." And I was like, "This is actually kind of awesome." I like teaching. I forgot I used to tutor Spanish and Italian in high school and college and that kind of thing.

Brian:     Now where did the name "7Drum" come from?

Miles:    Well, Seven ... It was originally called "7DrumLessons" because I wanted to show up more in the search engines because it was a clear name, drum lessons. [crosstalk 00:03:18] But something identity, maybe, of something ... I've thought a lot about it, but seven is about the chakras, the seven chakras of the human body.

Brian:     Really? No way. It comes from the chakras? [crosstalk 00:03:31] I love it. Miles, I had no idea, man. There you go. It's all about the chakras on Valentine's. But it's also all about the drums. There it is.

Miles:    So for those of you who don't know, there's seven ... The chakra system, which is basically an eastern based thing ... But it's now sort of just different energy centers of the body. They represent different emotions or energy that you can experience. And I though that it was kind of a cool way of categorizing the experience of being human and all that.

Brian:     Seven chakras. Love it. And is that a personal ... Are you big into the chakras or you familiar with it and you-

Miles:    I'm familiar with it. My mom talked to me about it. She's a reiki master which is where you ... I don't know. I don't really get it necessarily. [crosstalk 00:04:29] But you lie down and they clear your chakras of blockages or something. It's really cool. I don't know. Have you ever done that?

Brian:     I haven't tried before, but I've heard a lot of good things about it. So I'm a pretty open minded guy. I'd give it a shot. It sounds awesome. And I love the fact that that somehow stemmed into the name of this great thing. And so now tell us about this new location now. When did you move in? When did it open?

Miles:    Well let me just explain ... Maybe just get to that point first, I guess. I just started off ... Again I was just gonna do it on the side as I was looking for another job. And then people kept signing up. I realized that there wasn't anything else. So basically I brought my drum kit from high school into my living room. Somebody signed up. That was so amazing. It was like, I got an e-mail that someone signed up. I was like a stranger [crosstalk 00:05:25]

Brian:     That you didn't know. [inaudible 00:05:25] no longer was your friends. It was somebody else.

Miles:    Oh yeah.

Brian:     What a cool thing.

Miles:    Yeah, and he ended up taking lessons like four years, [crosstalk 00:05:32] which is awesome. Anyway, I was in my living room for three years, and then found a space on U Street. Got a three year lease there and that's where everything kind of blossomed. You made it sound like, the way you're describing it, that this is a new studio starting from zero. But we've actually already had about a hundred drum students and all these bands and stuff that preexisted. So our lease was up at the other spot so we moved to this new place. It was kind of tough to leave our beloved, yellow building. [crosstalk 00:06:09] But I--

Brian:     Where about in D.C. is this one located. You said on North Capitol Street.

Miles:    Yeah, North Capitol Street. So if you stand in the middle of North Capitol there is a ... Just watch for the cars, but-

Brian:     Don't stand in the middle of Capitol, for reference.

Miles:    Anyway, if you peak out you can see the Capitol Building It's kind of cool. It's like up on hill and then it's like right where North Capitol hits Florida Ave which goes straight over to U Street.

Brian:     Got it. Which is near ... What metro stop is that near?

Miles:    It's near the NoMa metro stop. So it's one block up from NoMa, basically.

Brian:     That's cool. So what about you outside of drums? We know that you ... We're pretty clear you've drums and you got a drum lesson place that's turned into a drum studio. What about you outside of those things?

Miles:    Well, it is Valentine's Day.

Brian:     Excellent.

Miles:    I'll start with what I should start with which is my amazing girlfriend [inaudible 00:07:08][crosstalk 00:07:09] Just gotta shout it out.

Brian:     Shout out to the love. The lady in his life. Yup, I love it. Okay.

Miles:    Amazing woman.

Brian:     Awesome. Happy Valentine's Day.

Miles:    Spend time with her. That's number one thing.

Brian:     Got it. Okay. Time with her.

Miles:    Check that off the list.

Brian:     Oh no. There's no checking. That one's in there automatically 'cause she's that awesome. So props to the woman in you life, man. Awesome.

Miles:    Thanks to ... I'm just gonna shout out to Bumble. Bumble's awesome.

Brian:     (Laughter) Yes, shout out to Bumble. I love it.

Miles:    It's been-

Brian:     Yes.

Miles:    Five months since that story. So you know, Valentine's Day theme.

Brian:     Okay, I dig it. Absolutely.

Miles:    Miles' personal life.

Brian:     All right, so out side of your life now, is there there more? What else? There's a dog, right?

Miles:    Yeah, there is a dog. You must know me or something.

Brian:     Yeah, I do. It's like I've seen you before. I've been buggin' you. Whatever. So, then, who's the dog? Tell us about the dog.

Miles:    Well my dog, his name is Remo, which is also a brand of drum head.

Brian:     Ah, so that's where the name comes from. A dog named Remo. Remo drum heads. Very good heads, by the way.

Miles:    He's a black lab/pointer mix. And so he's really cute in my biased opinion. He usually can be found at the studio. Very chill, relaxed dog for a three year old.

Brian:     Cool man.

Miles:    Oh no, go ahead.

Brian:     I was just gonna ask, what about the personal life? And I'm just curious. And I'm gonna ask you another question which is biggest success moment that comes to mind when you think about 7Drum. What comes to mind?

Miles:    Well, I mean that first student, was honestly still like a very emotional moment. His name was Mitch. He's awesome.[inaudible 00:09:03]

Brian:     And you got ... This was when you were still in your living room or hadn't even got the drum set yet?

Miles:    Hadn't even moved to D.C. yet. That was in December.

Brian:     Wow.

Miles:    Made the website and everything.

Brian:     Awesome.

Miles:    But anyway, that was cool. And then I guess another big thing was hitting a hundred students. Active enrolled students, which was like I think last fall.

Miles:    I just sort of had that number. It's a nice number. But of course that number is always sort of going up and down if someone's away for the summer. Then you're like, "Well do you count that?"

Brian:     No, we're counting it. A hundred students, [crosstalk 00:09:48] that amazing. That's amazing. I love it. Now, one of my favorite questions to ask is, "If you had one piece of advice to offer, what would it be?"

Miles:    Well, I prepared for this question but it was hard to pick one.

Brian:     All right, we'll start with one. What d'you got?

Miles:    I mean, I'd say visualize what you want.

Brian:     Say more.

Miles:    Spend time-

Brian:     In your head? Is it a vision board?

Miles:    Yeah, in your head. Thinking about what it is that you want to see happen. And it will happen. You have to ... And this is what big thing that helped me get to where we're at is just trying to set goals, you know. Working backwards from where you decide you want to get to.

Brian:     Sure. So are you at your vision? This place on North Capitol? What's your vision like in your head?

Miles:    Well right now I just want to take over the world. But-

Brian:     Got it. Okay.

Miles:    No, no, no. That's exaggeration. But honestly, well right now, you're asking my goals right now?

Brian:     Well you said you have a vision. So what was your vision before you got to here? Were you envisioning where you're at now? Did it look different in your head?

Miles:    No, when I started I didn't start this studio, or community, or business because I was trying to have a big 4,000 square foot studio. I just wanted to ... My vision was I thought people were working too hard in general and too stressed out and not having balanced enough lives. So I wanted to try to help people live more balanced, fulfilling lives.

Brian:     Got it.

Miles:    And I think that music should be like sports. Everyone has some sort of exercise that they like. Everyone should have some kind of music or artistic thing that they like, which I think most people do. But I don't know if it's already unacceptable, or something to be like, "No, I don't do any exercise."

Brian:     Got it.

Miles:    But what about ... We gotta get everyone going on music and feeling those vibes and-

Brian:     I agree. Well all right. So we'll get people going. And now I want to get to the amazing tracks that you brought us, but I do want you to share with folks what's the website. If they want to find out more about 7DrumCity, where do they go?

Miles:    7DrumCity.com

October 11, 2016 - Special Guest: Ménage À Garage

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FROM TODAY'S SHOW

NEWS

  1. DC Artists can submit their projects released 10-01-15 to 9-30-16 for consideration for the Wammies (Washington Area Music Awards).  I'm leaving this link here in case it comes back online, the WAMA email said it should still work, but as of 10-11-16 I tried this link and it's no longer working
    http://www.wamadc.com/wama/wammies/w-productregistry.html
  2. Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents Day is today, Oct 11th.  A DC band now, the band used to be in Austin.  They had their holiday proclaimed by the Mayor in 2012
    See the Video Here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2F6fKT9Gb8

MUSIC

  1. Tongues - Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents (Folk/Rock)
  2. Die in a Fire - Ménage À Garage (Punk/Pop Punk)
  3. Sweet Dreams - Sara Curtin (Indie/Pop Rock)
  4. Falling in a Dream - The Split Seconds (Punk/Pop Punk)
  5. Alone in the Seas - Calm and Crisis (Indie/Punk Rock)
  6. State Tengo Champions - The Hartford Pussies (Punk/90s Rock)
  7. Better Luck Next Time - Curse Words (Punk/Punk Rock)
  8. Intro/Outro music by Fellowcraft (Hard Rock/Blues)

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MÉNAGE À GARAGE

VIDEO - BIO - PHOTOS - TRANSCRIPT

BIO

Ménage À Garage DC Music Rocks

Ménage À Garage (MÀG) is an energetic poppy punk trio from Washington, DC. Since forming in 2015, MÀG has been immersed in the growing music scene in DC, performing at many local venues including DC 9 and the Rock & Roll Hotel. MÀG performs all-original music from the trifecta of rock storytelling (teen angst, corrupt politics, and outer space), and have become known for their energetic and heartfelt performance style, affecting melodies, and meticulous attention to song-craft and lyrics. MÀG is Jenny Thomas on bass, Alyson Cina on drums, and John Nolt on lead vocals and guitar.

LINKS:  

 

MENAGE A GARAGE DC MUSIC ROCKS
Ménage À Garage DC Music Rocks

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:  Ménage á Garage and their track, "Die in a Fire." So guys, tell us about that track.

Jenny:  John. What it was with that track, it has a long story, but we'll make it short.

John:  We have another song called "Ugly Duckling," which is kind of about someone who's been bullied. 

John:  During one of our practice sessions, the gang was like ... Well, we had some new chords and we were kind of running through these new chords, and I asked, "what should this song be about," and it kind of turned out that everybody said, "Well, what if we did a response to another song?" It turned out to be "Ugly Duckling," and so this song's lyrics are kind of a response as if we are responding to someone who wrote us a letter about the song "Ugly Duckling."

John:  "Ugly Duckling" being about bullying, this song, these lyrics, to me ... There's always been a little bit of tension in my mind about peoples' tendency to tell folks when they're troubled that it gets better.

Jenny:  It gets better.

John:  Because there are certain people who their outlook on life, they don't believe you, right? You can say, "No, it'll get better, don't worry, kid, it's going to be fine," and that kid's going to say, "You know what, don't tell me that." Adults always say things like that, and there's a certain mindset that responds better if you say, "Well, I don't know if it's going to get better; this is just the way life is. Life doesn't owe you anything. What are you going to do?"

Brian:  I see.

John:  "Are you going to give up? Are you going to turn tail and run? What if it never stops raining? What if it never rains again?" All of this stuff is an unknown, so that's kind of what the song is about. It sounds on its surface like it's very pessimistic and down, but it's really kind of a call to action about, what are you going to do if things don't go your way?

Brian:  I dig that message, and let's get to know you guys. So what I want you to do is, if you would introduce yourselves. I want to find out about who's John and who's Jenny, and then also tell us about Ménage á Garage and where the ... The brief history. You don't have to give me the long ones here, but the brief story about the band.

Jenny:  Oh sure, sure. Well, we met at Flash Band, which is an amazing little organization in D.C. It's a great resource for musicians, and it the theme was trios, so hence Ménage. It has actually no other overtones. It's just about three people.

Brian:  Got it, okay.

Jenny:  But music, we're a trio, a power trio, and both John and I have our long musical histories. I've been in a couple bands, and he's been doing all sorts of really educated musical things.

Brian:  So does this go all the way back? Are we talking like, elementary school, and ...

Jenny:  I think probably so, yeah, for both of us.

Brian:  Back there. 

Jenny:  Lifelong learning.

John:  Oh yeah, yeah. Absolutely.

Brian:  Got it, and at what point did you guys decide that, even as adults, we're going to keep doing this music thing, or has that always been the case? Did you stop and then come back to it?

John:  I never considered ... It never occurred to me that I could stop.

Brian:  Yeah, yeah. I don't believe in, like, "once a musician, always a musician." Sometimes you may have like a dry period, where you're just, whatever, not plugged into whatever you're ...

John:  I could see people stopping and doing other things, and I used to do that, and I've met plenty of people that have done that. It just never occurred to me to do that.

Jenny:  No. Doesn't occur to us.

John:  Nothing wrong with it.

Jenny:  That's why we're middle-aged people who play rock music and just embarrass ourselves publicly, and that's just what we do.

Brian:  It's a calculated embarrassment.

Jenny:  It's a skill. No no no.

Brian:  It's a skill. That's even better.

John:  It's owning our skill.

Jenny:  It's a true talent.

John:  Owning my embarrassment.

Jenny:  You know, yeah. It takes extra-special skill.

Brian:  There it is. So, briefly, then tell ... How did you get into music, way back in the beginning?

Jenny:  Okay. Well, my older brother ... I was always surrounded by music. My older brother listened to a lot of really great albums, and he was kind of into the punk scene in southern California, and so I got to listen to things like Hüsker Dü and all those things like, way back in the day. I've always just been attracted to music, and went to my first concert, Roxy Music, when I was 14, and that was a pretty good start. So both just being a musician, and I always ... Music has been a survival mechanism. I mean, it's like I can't live without it. So there was just no question.

Brian:  Wow. Okay. Committed to it. What about you, John?

John:  Well, my mother started me on piano lessons in second grade, and then she started me on cello lessons in third grade, and then I started myself on drum lessons in fourth grade.

John:  To get back at her for making me play the piano and the cello. I played all three of those things the whole way through high school, and into college where I went to Millersville in Lancaster, Pennsylvania for music education. So that was until I was 21, 22, something like that, and after that, played a lot of weddings, played a lot of string quartets, church cantatas, that sort of things. But I love pop music and taught myself guitar when I was working at a movie theater, running movies, and when you run the movies, you usually have a lot of down time, like 45 minutes while everything's playing.

Brian:  That does make sense.

John:  So I would bring my guitar in and be up in the booth, just playing and writing songs and teaching myself how to do that, which is what I really always wanted to do while I was learning how to play Mozart on the cello.

Brian:  That's amazing. All right. So what do you love and appreciate, I like to ask folks, what do you love and appreciate about the D.C. music scene?

Jenny:  Sure. Well I mean, I don't even know if this is unique to D.C., but it's just been my experience of D.C. which is, there's so many good people in the scene. Maybe we've just been fortunate to plug into various musical communities. I just find people are very welcoming and supportive of each other as musicians, so one of the best things, which is why I love that we're here today; one of the best things is just getting to listen to all of this D.C. music and learning about it, because otherwise, I mean, we're not very ... Or a a show, and the live shows that happen around town, you know we wouldn't know about all this great music.

Brian:  That's true. John, what about you? What do you love about the scene?

John:  Well, there are, like Jenny said, there are a lot of talented, generous people in the scene, such as yourself and your band mates, and some of the folks, well I guess all of the folks that we're going to play today.

Jenny:  No, no just some. We're going to call them out.

John:  Well, there's one ...

Jenny:  Who will remain unnamed.

John:  But that's really what it is. The quality and the level of proficiency of the music in D.C. is very high. Historically, D.C. has a great tradition of a professional level of music, and the even the DIY and amateur scene keeps that level up, which is what I appreciate because I don't consider myself a hobbyist. I mean, I aspire to a professional level of quality, even though it's not how I make my living. I think that's what you have to do if you're a passionate musician, unless you're just going to be at home playing the guitar and playing Jimmy Buffett, which is perfectly fine, and there's nothing wrong with that, but it's not me.

Brian:  Right, and what you say is really true also. I've got to say, in doing this show, I've gotten to hear so many of these really talented people who, they do this on the side, and they're professional caliber. But they do it on the side as their hobby, and they make their living another way, and it's truly incredible to see.

John:  It's an avocation versus a vocation.

Brian:  Exactly. Exactly. Well, very eloquently put. I dig it. Tell me about your best show that you've done here in town. Well, not even in town, just in general. What's the best who you've done? 

Jenny:  Well, I mean, we're having a little debate about this, but ... So John ... There was one particular show at Wonderland Ballroom where we were, just because stuff happens, we were forced to really ...

John:  We had a hard stop.

Jenny:  We had a hard stop. We were the last band, and suddenly there was just no more time left at all, and we had to pretty much figure out how to play our nice, cozy 35-minute set in about 20 minutes.

Brian:  Oh my goodness.

Jenny:  We were just like, you know, jumping on stage, and we just said "Let's do it," and we just throw down ...

John:  [crosstalk 00:08:48] tucks. No pedals, no nothing.

Jenny:  The crowd that was there, they were great. They went crazy. They were bouncing off the walls dancing. They thought it was just amazing. I mean ...

John:  They knocked the monitors over.

Jenny:  Our music is well-suited to having to go really fast anyway, so it worked out okay.

Brian:  This is true. The punk genre, it definitely ... Good upbeat tempos, upbeat energy; I can imagine that was one heck of a show.

Jenny:  Right, right, and I would say we're definitely more in the pop-punk realm, just not to mislead anybody. But punk in spirit, all the way, so you nailed that.

Brian:  Got it. Now what about ... What's the future look like for you guys? Let me just ask it. What's the future look like for you guys?

Jenny:  Long. There are a lot of years.

Brian:  A lot of years, so you're not going anywhere, okay. So is there a goal you're working toward, or just want to keep making music?

Jenny:  Always, yes. That is the point. Oh, and now we've got our trailer guy, right behind us, so we're ... Yeah. He's trying out.

John:  We aspire to play at every venue in D.C.

Jenny:  That's right.

John:  It would be a great achievement. That would be a milestone for us.

Jenny:  Yeah.

John:  We've still got some to tick off that we're working on, but that's what I think the future would hold for us, and more recording. We're kind of thinking about different approaches to recording and how to put out music in 2016, like how does it work today? What's the best way? We've recorded and EP, and we've watched a lot of our friends, including Fellowcraft, release their EPs, and we're trying to learn from that and figure out, what is the modern ...

Jenny:  Exactly.

John:  What is the way for the 90s to do it, you know?

Jenny:  So we do have an EP coming out, and we want to continue to record because we already have a bunch of songs that we are chomping at the bit to like get to the studio, and even if we're just doing one at a time, just getting them out so folks can enjoy them. As for all those venues that we're going to play, venues out there, we're looking at you.

Brian:  Very excited.

Jenny:  Yeah, here we come.

John:  We write a lot, and it will be great to have our songs out there for people who come to the shows to be able to hear in advance and maybe look forward to them, rather than a more traditional approach of recording it and then working on it, and then six months later, you release it, and then you play those songs. We're just thinking about different approaches to that. So I think that's in our future; some experimentation.

Brian:  One of my favorite questions to ask is one piece of advice you would offer to musicians?

John:  Join Flashband.

Jenny:  And be yourself.

Brian:  Best, most succinct answers yet. Join Flashband, and be yourself. What about a special message for your fans?

Jenny:  All of our fans, so wait, how many is that? 

John:  Jenny's fans?

Brian:  All of those fans out there. 

Jenny:  We love you. I think I'm going to try to get this guy, who's drilling the door, to be our fan. We were super excited when actually ... Just so you know, the inner workings of a musician's brain, right, that we were really excited when we met our first fan who we did not know.

Brian:  Ah, yes

Jenny:  They were not someone's friend, or ...

Brian:  It's the transition.

Jenny:  I mean it, ended up it was somebody's friend, but she legitimately said, like, "No no no, I came because of you guys, not just because I know your friend over here. That's just a coincidence." So...

John:  I don't think she's been to a show since that one.

Jenny:  That's true. Oh well, we're working on it.

Brian:  There's been so many others since then.

Jenny:  So we're asking, won't you be our fan? Please?

John:  She just did that to get us to buy her a beer, I think. I'm in a band.

Brian:  There you go.

John:  It worked.

Brian:  Clever. Clever. I dig it guys. For those folks who want to find out more about Ménage á Garage, where do they go? What are the best places to find you?

John:  All the places. 

Jenny:  All the places. You know, Facebook. I know. We know that it's a struggle for people who don't know French that we have all these accents, okay, but it's ...

John:  You don't have to type the accents. You'll get to us.

Jenny:  You don't. It's spelled ... it's not Nicki Minaj spelling; it's men-age a garage. That's like the easiest phonetic spelling I can kind of give over the radio.

John:  If you type that in to any convenient search box, you will probably find us

Jenny:  Just Google.

August 16, 2016 - Special Guest: Maryjo Mattea

^^Episode Is Live Now - Click Above (might take time to buffer/load, refresh page if issue)^^

National Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcherPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice



MARYJO MATTEA

Video - Bio - Photos

Maryjo Mattea DC Music Rocks

Washington, DC-based folk-pop-punk-rock songstress Maryjo Mattea captivates audiences with her uniquely melodic songwriting and hauntingly beautiful voice. She is often joined by a Pile of Dudes, and also plays in the acoustic Beatles tribute act, Doctor Robert and Penny Lane, (www.drandpl.com), electro-rock group, Color Palette (www.colorpaletteband.com), and the grunge-garage rock duo, Two Dragons and a Cheetah (www.twodragonsandacheetah.com).

Website: www.maryjomattea.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/maryjomattea

Twitter: www.twitter.com/maryjomattea

Instagram: www.instagram.com/maryjomattea

Color Palette DC Music Rocks
Two Dragons and a Cheetah DC Music Rocks

The Premier Episode!

July 5th 2016

The world premier episode, and it was a blast!  There isn't an audio recording of this first show, it was only a live radio broadcast and will be fondly remembered by those that were there listening live!  Here's the songs and links to the bands that were featured, definitely a delight to highlight the huge talents featured in that very first show!