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Justin Trawick

4/10/18 - Special Guest: Justin Trawick

Thanks to Justin Trawick for hanging out with us in the studio this week!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. ***G.U.N (Give up on the now), by Radar (Rock, Dance-Rock)

  2. The Bright Side, by Justin Trawick and the Common Good (Bluegrass, Rock)

  3. ***Barista Boyfriend, by Louisa Hall (Folk, Indie Pop)

  4. ***City, Sing to Me, by Blue Plains (Indie, Alternative)

  5. My Father's Gun, by Justin Jones (Rock, Folk)

***The first time we've played this artist for you on the show, & a new artist profile added to our DC Artist Database!  There's new artists every week!

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


ANNOUNCEMENTS

HELP US REACH THE GO-GO BANDS!
We love Go-go and now have a page in our DC Artist Database dedicated exclusively to the Go-go.  We have Rare Essence and The Chuck Brown Band on there, and we’ve heard from the JOGO Project. We’re trying to connect with EU, Trouble Funk, Junk Yard Band and the other ones we're missing to get them added.  We’ve emailed and messaged them but they haven’t responded. If you’re connected to any actual members of those bands, would you email introduce us to them or forward this!? It’s a Go-go town, we’d love to add them to our site!  We just need them to click on the "musicians click here" button on our home page www.dcmusicrocks.com and fill out the form on our site one time and we’ll be all set going forward! Thanks for your help connecting us with our love!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/gogo


NEW MUSIC RELEASES

Round About - Coming Into Focus (11 Song Rock Album, RIYL Barenaked Ladies)


NEW VIDEOS

Aaron Abernathy - Generation (R&B, RIYL Prince)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SxpttD-6oGw

Lesson Zero - Not That Bad (Rock, RIYL The Eagles)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_JuQMh4KKPU


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Here’s just a few highlights for the coming week, be sure to check out the calendar for the full list of all the upcoming shows!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Sat Apr 14
--Emancipation Day Concert @ Freedom Plaza by Metro Center featuring Rare Essence and more! (Go-Go, RIYL Chuck Brown)
--Melodime @ Milkboy Arthouse in College Park, MD (Rock, RIYL Zac Brown Band)

Sun Apr 15
--Dior Ashley Brown and Band @ Anacostia Arts Center as part of Flower Power Event (Hip Hop, RIYL Queen Latifah)

Tues Apr 17
--Olivia Mancini & The Mates @ Jammin Java (Pop, RIYL Jenny Lewis)

Wed Apr 18
--Aztec Sun @ Wolf Trap (Funk, RIYL Earth Wind & Fire)
--Eli Lev & Emma G @ Milkboy Arthouse (Indie/Pop, RIYL Mumford & Sons, Adele)


Patreon

Do you like what we're doing?  Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **Music 4 The Revolution (Abu Jibran)**


We're Looking For Sponsors

We're looking for local businesses to sponsor us!  Know One?  Would you introduce us to them?



Justin Trawick

Video - Bio - Links - Transcript

Justin's Bio:

Justin-Trawick-Bio.jpg

Justin Trawick and The Common Good’s debut record, “The Riverwash EP”, exemplifies the raw emotional live sound Trawick and the band have cultivated over the years playing in clubs and festivals up and down the East Coast. With instrumentation consisting of acoustic guitar, upright bass, fiddle, mandolin, and pedal steel, the band’s live performance plays fast and loose with the “Americana” genre, performing heartfelt ballads followed by raucous bluegrass melodies and even moments of hip hop verses. Written by DC based songwriter Justin Trawick, “The Riverwash EP” introduces the listener to Trawick’s unique brand storytelling with five original songs about love, loss, longing, resilience, and time pulling heartstrings of listeners young and old. Adam Levy (Norah Jones, Tracy Chapman) guest performs on guitar during “All the Places That I’ve Been”, a song inspired by Trawick’s ninety-seven year old grandmother and her stories of the World War II generation. Finally, the album closes with the band’s unique take on “Wonderwall” by Oasis, a track sure to trick the audience into thinking they’re listening to another Trawick original. 

Justin Trawick has been performing in the Washington DC area and along the East Coast since 2006, citing musical influences like Bob Schneider, The Tallest Man on Earth, G. Love, Old Crow Medicine Show, and David Gray. In June of 2015, Trawick released his first single, “Goodbye”, under the band name "Justin Trawick and the Common Good”; written about the search for direction and belonging in a world that constantly feels one step ahead of you. Trawick has performed for TedxEast in NYC at the City Winery, TedxPennsylvaniaAvenue in DC at the Newseum, and has opened for over 30 national acts including Suzanne Vega, Wyclef Jean, Brett Dennen, Blues Traveler, Enter The Haggis, Bob Schneider, and Edwin McCain, and shared bills with Dr. Dogg and The Avett Brothers. In February of 2014, Trawick won “Song of the Year” at the Washington Area Music Awards for his song “All the Places That I’ve Been," which can be downloaded on iTunes as a single along with his five other solo records and EPs. Founder of the nationally touring show “The 9 Songwriter Series” and co-founder of “The Circus Life Podcast" with guests such as Kevin Eubanks, Chris Thomas King, Ernie Halter, Yarn, and Snuffy Walden, Trawick has built a brand that extends far beyond his home base in DC. For more information, please visit http://justintrawick.com.

Full Band - Photo Credit - Martin Radigan 1.JPG

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:     I'm DC music rocks we are shining a spotlight on the great songs, and the incredible people behind the DC regions local music scene. Justin Trawick has been a staple in the scene for as long as I have been in DC and probably more. I will never forget the moment where, my bad was starting out and yours was one of the ones that get tossed around with DC music quite a lot. Your one of those names that I have known for a while. So, working with you, and gotten advice and guidance from you and your thoughts on different things. The local music world connects with Justin. So, I have been a fan for a while, and its truly an honor and I am excited. Thanks for being with us here today man.

Justin Trawick:     Was it you and me that had a 45 minute conversation in my parent's parking lot on the phone, years ago before you started doing this show.

Brian:     I am laughing so hard because I definitely, if it was in your parent's parking lot I wouldn't have known because it was on the phone. It could have been, we were talking about the business. This was even before this, it think that was a Fellowcraft conversation.

Justin Trawick:     But I told you that you had a good broadcast voice. Do you remember that.

Brian:     I do, now that you bring that up.

Justin Trawick:     And here you are, successful, you own multiple beach homes.

Brian:     Oh stop it, this is not about me and my beach homes. Thanks though.   Alright so lets talk about you. Now first and foremost the name Justin Trawick and the common good. And the common good what is that.

Justin Trawick:     I am from Virginia, I grew up in Louisburg and went to college in Fayetteville, Virginia at Longwood University and I live in Arlington now. I am a Virginian probably more technically a northern Virginian but I am a Virginian. So when i was looking for a band name, I really wanted to somehow involve Virginia in the band name. The common wealth was already taken, Justin Trawick and the Common wealth. So looked up Common Wealth in Wikipedia and on Wikipedia the definition of common Wealth, I would have to look at it again but the definition of common wealth in Wikipedia has doing something for the common good. So Justin Trawick and the common Good is a subtle reference to Virginia.

Brian:     Oh my god, a little tribute to Virginia. I love it. You said you were in Louisburg, when did you, you’re in Arlington now?

Justin Trawick:     I live in Arlington, just down the street from here. We can get drunk and stumble home to my place and watch Netflix.

Brian:     It sounds like such a fun evening I got to be honest. It really does. How long has it been since you came to Arlington.

Justin Trawick:     I been in Arlington since 2006, I was commuting back and forth from my parents house to regular day jobs for two years after graduating college in 04. Then I moved into an apartment building down the street, of which is in about 45 days is going to ceased to exist. I got a letter from my landlord that says that your building is going to be demolished. It is no longer going to be there. So i have to figure out my life now.

Brian:     Okay. You got some figuring to do. My god. In regards to figuring your life out, I wanted to ask you when did you decide to make the decision to do music full time. This is a full-time thing for you.

Justin Trawick:     Yes, my last job ended in 2008.

Brian:     What was it that pushed you to the edge that made you say okay I am just going to commit to this.

Justin Trawick:     I got laid off.

Brian:     Okay. I was like I could find another job or this music thing could work if I give it ago.

Justin Trawick:     My parents defiantly wanted your first option, they wanted me to get a job. Come on, my parents were the people who, my dad had two jobs for his entire adulthood, my mother had one. That's our greatest generation, that a baby boomer generation thing. I always wanted to do music full time, I think I am actually happy that I was laid off. If I had not been laid off, I don't think that I would have had the guts to quit a job that was giving me money to show up somewhere. It's everyone's dream, it's really hard to just say I don't want money just handed to me anymore, I am going to go do my own thing. So when that choice is made for me, I kind of in about a week or two of some thinking had realized without really knowing it. I amassed enough of business of bars that I was playing, and a little bit of notoriety already that I actually could afford to pay my rent, my health insurance, my car insurance, even going on terrible dates and stuff like that on music and DC is a really great place to do that, there is a lot of money to be made as an artist as opposed to anywhere else in the country.

     The government is not going out of business, there is a lot of organizations that are spending money on events. I am a working musician here and I go to places like New York and I try to get seen.

Brian:     You are involved in a lot of things, not just Justin Trawick and the Common Good. You play show, and I heard people talk about the nine. Talk about the other stuff that you are doing.

Justin Trawick:     The nine was right before my job ended, I was attempting to come up with a way for me and my friends to get in better venues and to get in front of more people. Some sort of collective, at the time there were two different national tours happening. There was one called the Hotel Café tour, which is Hotel café is a really famous [inaudible 00:05:49] venue in Hollywood, California. Of people that become famous from playing there. The same way people are becoming famous for playing at Rockwood, or the living room in New York. There is also something called ten out of Tenn. Which is ten people out of Tennessee, national specifically. These two tours are doing things that the Hotel Café tour were touring as all these people hanging out at Hotel Café, all friend were like why don't we just tour together. Ten out of Tenn was all these friends, big artists from Nashville touring as a big collective group. One of the best shows I seen happening was at Iota, which again if your listening we are in Arlington, Virginia. Iota is now a club that is defunked just down the street from us, it is where I got started. Very sad that is gone, one of the best shows I saw was a Ten out of Tenn. So with the Nine, I pitched the town of buyer Steve Lambert the DC Nine which is on the corner of u street and ninth street.

 

 You know the DC9. Hey I'm looking to do a collective kind of shows, a unique kind of show structure. What if we call it the Nine at DC9. Sometimes I wish the place was called DC six, Dc Seven cause nine is a lot. But now it's like I've committed to the branding at this point, this year is my tenth year. This year we are actually planning a very big tenth anniversary show, I am talking to some of the bigger venues but I am really excited about it but the Nine has been great. Rachel Planton, which everyone knows is on the radio now has done it, Jimmy Haha from Jimmy's Chicken track has done it. I mean Adam Levy who is the guitar player for Nora Jones. The guy who plays the sweet guitar licks. Give me one reason by Tracy Chapman which you always here when you are shopping for pasta or any kind of grocery store. We have had some big people on it, and I am attempting to try and expand it.

Brian:     That's amazing. When you are not doing all this stuff what are you hobbies, or interests. You mention Netflix earlier, does that mean you’re a Netflix nut, what do you do in your free time.

Justin Trawick:     I play racquetball, do you play racquetball Brian because I am looking for racquetball partners.

Brian:     I totally used to play racquetball.

Justin Trawick:     Like used to in college?

Brian:     Like meaning in college, or when I was growing up. Meaning I totally know the rules of racquetball and can play.

Justin Trawick:     Were you good?

Brian:     No but...

Justin Trawick:     What did you call yourself a sportsman?

Brian:     No, I am a recreational person. I don't think I would call it sports with the level that I played at. That's to say. For you, so there's racquetball and what else.

Justin Trawick:     I mean I do like my stories. Which is kind of like what women say about their soap operas but I do like watching Netflix. I really do.

Brian:     When you say I like your stories, what stories are you referring to. Like certain shows.

Justin Trawick:     Well no , like did you never watch All My Children when you came home from kindergarten with your parents or with your mom specifically. Unless your dad really liked soap operas.

Brian:     No, I can’t say that I did.

Justin Trawick:     No, me either.

Brian:     I escaped that apparently. Sadly I missed that from my childhood. I have been deprived.

Justin Trawick:     So I love a good dramatic television show and I think that is because the fact that I am also an emotional songwriter. I say that as a joke like my stories, because I heard people talk about watching soap operas and they call them their stories. Truthfully, I love a good story. I really do. This is sad, but this is true. I can figure out a way to cry during a commercial. If they told the commercial really well.

Brian:     That's amazing. Alright. In some time in your life I want you to watch television with Justin Trawick, because that sounds like maybe a Superbowl, with what they do with the commercials. It would be good. Tears would be involved it would be like an Emmy winning performance I'm sure.

Justin Trawick:     We will just put mute when the game happens.

Brian:     My favorite question to ask though, and I definitely want to ask you this is if you can offer one piece of advice what would it be.

Justin Trawick:     In terms of what.

Brian:     However you want to answer it. I am purposely leaving it open for you, it's a blank canvas, what advice.

Justin Trawick:     I would probably say see the sunlight.

Brian:     Say more.

Justin Trawick:     I mean get out, it is extremely easy especially when you work for yourself. It is extremely easy to live in your cave, to live in your own world and to just forget that anything else exists. It's very easy to not socialize yourself if no one else is doing it for you. When my last day job ended, i kind of really had to learn that. I didn't learn it the hard way but I kind of started off with a handicap of really not understanding it. So again, I very often at times Brian do not see the sunlight. I can be at home, I can be working or something like that and suddenly it's six o'clock and I'm like okay I am going to play a gig.

Brian:     You didn't leave the house until after it already had gone down.

Justin Trawick:     No you have got to have hobbies, so I play racquetball because I meet up with my friends, I get to hear what's going on in their lives. Then I get to go back in my own world.

Brian:     Alright get out and see the sun I like that. That's good advice. Okay one more time for those folks that want to find out more about you and all the stuff you have going on where do they go?

Justin Trawick:     My brand new website, JustinTrawick.com. There is videos, there is t-shirts and all kinds of music.

2/27/18 - New Music Release Highlights From 2018 So Far - All Music Episode

We're on Spring Break here at DC Music Rocks.  During this vacation time for us, we're listening to the new releases just from 2018 so far, and we think they're SO GOOD!  Here's an episode full of some of the good ones we've found, we hope you enjoy!  

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcherPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM TODAY'S SHOW

MUSIC

  1. This Is Love, by Justin Trawick and the Common Good (Folk/Bluegrass)

  2. Blessings, by Alex Vaughn (Hip Hop/R&B)

  3. Flight 232, by Dan Wolff (Rock/Pop Rock)

  4. Be My Home, by Lauren Calve (Folk/Indie)

  5. Wide Eyed and Reckless, by Mystery Friends (Indie/Synth Pop)

  6. What Are We, by Sub-Radio (Pop/Synth Pop)

  7. The Lake, by Wylder (Indie)

  8. Dance With You, by Mista Fingaz (Electronic Pop/R&B)

  9. Pressure, by Luke James Shaffer (Rock/Pop Rock)

  10. Downtown, by Dupont Brass (Funk/Brass Band)

  11. Devastation, by Elizabeth II (Rock/Pop Rock)

  12. Boss's Dime, by Two Ton Twig (Bluegrass)

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


 

PATREON

Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **Music 4 The Revolution (Abu Jibran)**



2-27-18 All Music 2018 New Releases.jpg

10/17/17 - Special Guest: Chris Cassaday

Thanks to Chris Cassaday for hanging out with us in the studio this week!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might take time to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcherPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

FROM TODAY'S SHOW

MUSIC

  1. Blood Moon, by Chris Timbers (Rock, Americana)
  2. The Bad Man, by Chris Cassaday (Folk, Folk-Rock)
  3. Red Herring (Alternate), by Surprise Attack (Funk/Jam)
  4. Lion's Den, by Bottled Up (Punk, Surf)
  5. Hold, by Wally Worsley (Hard Rock, Rock)
  6. After All Is Said and Done, by Justin Trawick (Bluegrass, Rock)

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-

ANNOUNCEMENTS

We have a whole series of playlists on Spotify for you to enjoy.  The DC Music Rocks Show playlist is up to 422 songs and features all the songs we’ve played on this show in the past, set it to “shuffle” and enjoy!  We hope you’ll click “Follow” on that one!  We also have mood and genre playlists for you on our playlist page. www.dcmusicrocks.com/playlists

Our DC Music Rocks Show Playlist: https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/5tNIZ3Afg1vz6gkqvHpDjE

NEW RELEASES

Music:
Ddespair - Next To Me (Single)
https://open.spotify.com/track/3JrUNzFOABnMsiFhl4tq8M
Alecia Renece - The Struggle (Single)
https://open.spotify.com/track/59not3wz5cmjcTMy3XVAyR

Our ‘2017 New Releases by DC Artists’ Spotify Playlist:
https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/24KrZD9KlUE2yC3eT2oBUI

Video:
Sara Curtin - Wellish Home
https://youtu.be/Vg28pTgo9Xw
Edjacated Phools - Life Is What You Make Of It
https://youtu.be/Bq0wJMiIoaM
Higher Education - Wait
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZOjpmXsjNa0
The Fringe Benefits Band - Step Out
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pybWB-Ns--U
Bumper Jacksons - Old Birds
https://youtu.be/fhudVPYD8RM

Our ‘DC Artists Official Music Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70kU0_uB-sdviWajkbzi2Akr

THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Fri Oct 20
Edjacated Fools & Higher Education @ U Maryland in College Park
Juliet Lloyd @ Rocklands Farm Winery in Poolesville, MD
Chris Cassaday @ Songbyrd Music House in Adams Morgan in NW DC
Den-Mate @ Black Cat on 14th St in NW DC
Black Masala @ Gypsy Sally’s in Georgetown in NW DC
Oh He Dead & Soldier’s of Suburbia @ Rock and Roll Hotel on H St in NE DC

Sat Oct 21
Sub-Radio @ Sauf Haus Bier Garden by Dupont in NW DC
Vim & Vigor @ World Of Beer in Ashburn, VA

Sun Oct 22
Rare Essence @ Warner Theatre by Metro Center in NW DC

Thu Oct 26
Sara Curtin & The North Country @ Black Cat on 14th St in NW DC
Alex Vaughn @ Songbyrd Music House in Adams Morgan in NW DC
Flasher @ Rock N Roll Hotel on H St in NE DC


https://www.patreon.com/dcmusicrocks
Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, cohost spots on the show, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!



Chris Cassaday

VIDEO - BIO - LINKS - TRANSCRIPT

BIO:

Chris Cassaday_30Jul2017-48.JPG

Chris Cassaday is a folk-funk singer/songwriter from Arlington, Virginia. Chris's unique blend of blues, folk and funk, his crafty songwriting style, his unpredictable set lists, and his thunderous, distinctive voice have captivated audiences in the DMV, up and down the east coast, and around the country. With two albums released, a song being played on SiriusXM radio's the Coffeehouse, and a resume of hundreds of amazing performances under his belt, Chris has proven himself as a must-see act in the Washington D.C. music scene. 

WEBSITE: http://chriscassadaymusic.wixsite.com/chriscassaday

FACEBOOK: facebook.com/chriscassadaymusic

TWITTER: @ccassadaymusic

INSTAGRAM: @chriscassadaymusic

chris cassaday.jpg

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:     Here on DC Music Rocks we are shining a spotlight on the great songs, artists, and incredible people behind the DC region's local music scene. Chris Cassaday is a singer-songwriter from Arlington, Virginia, with a unique blend of blues, folk, and funk. His crafty songwriting style, his unpredictable set lists, and his thunderous, distinctive voice have captivated audience in the DMV for a while. With two albums released, a song being played on Sirius XM Radio's The Coffeehouse, and a resume of hundreds of amazing performances under his belt, Chris is an awesome act, and I hope you get to see him live at some point.  I first came across him doing this show, and I've been such a fan of his music, and now I actually get to have him here in the studio with me and this is such a treat, man. Thanks for being here.

Chris Cassaday:     Thanks for having me.

Brian:     Now talk about, so you're born and raised in Virginia ...

Chris Cassaday:     Yes sir.

Brian:     Wow. So, Great Falls and then into Arlington. Now did you go away for school, or have you really been Virginia the whole time?

Chris Cassaday:     I don't know if I would call it going away. I went to JMU in Harrisonburg. It's a couple hours away. It's far enough where your parents can't bother you, but close enough where it's not a hike to get home.

Brian:     So you've really been in the area for your whole life pretty much.

Chris Cassaday:     Yeah pretty much. Always been around Virginia in some way, shape, or form.

Brian:     And where and when, how did music start?

Chris Cassaday:     Well my dad got me my first guitar when I was 14 years old. And I had always been singing, when I was a little kid, singing in the backseat. I had a really deep voice as a kid and everyone used to make fun of me for it.

Brian:     Oh yeah?

Chris Cassaday:     My dad was like, "You sounded like Rod Stewart when you were like six years old." But I was always singing. So he was finally like, he got me a guitar, and I took lessons for a brief period. And it always just stuck with me; I loved it. And it kind of developed as I got older; I was in bands in high school. And when I went to college at JMU I kind of got into the whole solo acoustic thing, just sitting in my dorm strumming and writing down lyrics. And really fell in love with it.

Brian:     And it's always been guitar, or other instruments too?

Chris Cassaday:     You know, I actually started on bass. I was a bass player first.

Brian:     Really?

Chris Cassaday:     Yeah. But was taking guitar lessons while I was playing bass in the band, you know, and then we kind of did a whole switcheroo thing in my high school band where we got to play different instruments, so ... I was kind of learning two instruments at the same time.

Brian:     Nice. So guitar and bass.

Chris Cassaday:     Yeah.

Brian:     Wow. And what age was this again? When did that start?

Chris Cassaday:     That was like age 14 probably, yeah.

Brian:     Got it. So high school is really when ...

Chris Cassaday:     High school, exactly.

Brian:     The music education kicked in. Got it. Wow. So then what's your earliest memory with music? What comes to mind?

Chris Cassaday:     Oh man. My earliest memory with music is ... Oh boy. This is tough. Probably singing, I can't believe I'm saying this on the air. So, I sang a Nickleback song in the sixth grade talent show, when I went to the [inaudible 00:02:48].

Brian:     Don't judge him! Don't judge him! He did.

Chris Cassaday:     No judgment here, folks. I sang "How You Remind Me."

Brian:     Oh, excellent.

Chris Cassaday:     Which was a good song at the time. I mean, you know ...

Brian:     Yeah. Oh, that was huge back then.

Chris Cassaday:     But, we played the karaoke track of that and I sang it and, needless to say I was a stud at my elementary school for the next few weeks.

Brian:     Did you win? Did you win that talent- [crosstalk 00:03:09]

Chris Cassaday:     It was just like everyone performs; there wasn't an actual winner, yeah.

Brian:     Oh a showcase, I gotcha. Wow.

Chris Cassaday:     But, I think I won.

Brian:     Oh that's funny. So you are secretly a Nickelback fan. We'll keep that a secret between us.

Chris Cassaday:     Uh, yeah.

Brian:     And whoever's listening. No. And that was your first memory I guess performing too.

Chris Cassaday:     Yes sir.

Brian:     It would have been that one. Wow. Alright now, so outside of music then, you've got to have some hobbies and stuff. What do you do outside of music?

Chris Cassaday:     Well me and my girlfriend Haley live up the street in Rosalind, and we go to a lot of concerts, whoever's in town.

Brian:     Do you?

Chris Cassaday:     Yeah, we went to a ton of concerts this summer. I mean, I love music, local and big shows. Also, I love hockey, a big hockey guy. I play adult league hockey.

Brian:     Nice. Do you?

Chris Cassaday:     In fact I have to meet up tonight at Kettler.

Brian:     Wow.

Chris Cassaday:     At like, 11 p.m. tonight; it's late.

Brian:     Wow.

Chris Cassaday:     Late till ... but I love hockey.

Brian:     And this isn't roller hockey; we're talking ice hockey.

Chris Cassaday:     This is ice hockey. Yeah, I played when I was growing up, played at JMU and still trying to keep it going. Needless to say I'm horribly out of shape now, so it's getting tougher, but ...

Brian:     Oh, you seem pretty trim to me man. You don't look terrible.

Chris Cassaday:     It's like riding a bike, except way more humiliating if you mess up.

Brian:     When you mess up, I got it. And like shows, or other, there's a little bit of ice hockey and some going to see concerts. And anything else? What else is his life like?

Chris Cassaday:     Um, I'm trying to think here. Traveling. Love to travel. I like getting out of town whenever I can. In fact we were talking, Haley and I just got back from Ireland; I was there for nine days.

Brian:     Get out of here!

Chris Cassaday:     Yeah, I loved it.

Brian:     Where in Ireland did you go?

Chris Cassaday:     We started in Dublin and rented a car and drove around the country. Which is terrifying by the way, driving on the other side of the road.

Brian:     Really?

Chris Cassaday:     It was terrifying.

Brian:     Oh, because they drive on the opposite side.

Chris Cassaday:     And the roads are so narrow there ...

Brian:     Ah, man!

Chris Cassaday:     I'm like, how can this be okay? Where we stayed in Cork ...

Brian:     Wait, who drive, did you or Haley drive?

Chris Cassaday:     We switched off, but you felt safer in the driver's seat because, you know, everything's backwards so you're just like ...

Brian:     You want to be in control.

Chris Cassaday:     But it was fantastic, my first time in Europe. I had a blast.

Brian:     Wow. First time. Congratulations on making it to the Euro Theater for the first time, man.

Chris Cassaday:     Thanks man.

Brian:     Holy smokes. Alright now, so funniest moment that comes to mind in performing now?

Chris Cassaday:     Like a funny incident, or ...

Brian:     Sure! That's good. Yeah.

Chris Cassaday:     Okay. There's a few, but the one that always comes to mind when people ask me like, about embarrassing moments was, I was playing with this high school band I was mentioning. In front of the whole school; we had this place called The Commons, which was like the middle of the school, and we were playing, and the whole school was watching, and I was jumping around, you know, playing bass, and my strap broke and my bass just fell to the floor.

Brian:     Oh my god!

Chris Cassaday:     In the middle of a song. And I was just like, "Uhhhh ..."

Brian:     Did it break too?

Chris Cassaday:     No it didn't break, thank god. But I just had to like scoop it up and strap it back on, and ...

Brian:     Hoping nobody saw that.

Chris Cassaday:     No, but it broke.

Brian:     But everybody did.

Chris Cassaday:     Since then I got the locks you know, so the strap won't go anywhere.

Brian:     Right, yeah, the strap locks. By the way, a public service announcement for any guitar players, make sure you have strap locks.

Chris Cassaday:     Good advice.

Brian:     A best practice. Nice. Courtesy of Chris Cassaday's amazing moment from performing.   Alright, so tell us a story about a time you tried and failed.

Chris Cassaday:     Tried and failed? Oh boy. One time I tried to cover a Bruno Mars song and just absolutely failed.

Brian:     Oh! Which one? Do you remember?

Chris Cassaday:     It was ... (singing).

Brian:     Oh, nice.

Chris Cassaday:     That was a while ago though ...

Brian:     Okay wait a minute. Just for the record, how does it go, one more time?

Chris Cassaday:     (Singing.) Yeah, see that's exactly why I tried right there.

Brian:     Oh, trying.

Chris Cassaday:     That was a long time ago. A lot of people, I don't even think Haley knows about that, but it was at an open mic and I was like, "You know I'm going to go for it," and it didn't go well.

Brian:     Didn't go well. Oh my gosh, that's amazing. Now, and what do you have in your musical, aside from Bruno Mars now, what do you have in your music collection that might surprise us?

Chris Cassaday:     I love doing like mashups of songs. I've got a lot of Dave Matthews in there; I do this Dave Matthews song "Jimi Thing" and I mash it up with "For What It's Worth" by Buffalo Springfield.

Brian:     Wow.

Chris Cassaday:     In addition to old songs like Buffalo Springfield, I'll do newer, like rap songs. "Hold On We're Going Home" by Drake. And I've got a lot of reggae in my repertoire. Love reggae music.

Brian:     Nice.

Chris Cassaday:     A lot of Sublime in there, stuff of that nature. And I also do a mean "Lose Yourself" by Eminem.

Brian:     Oh yeah?

Chris Cassaday:     Like at the end of a show. Like, if the crowd's kind of dying down, I'll just do like the (singing) and [inaudible 00:07:43].

Brian:     Wow. Oh man.

Chris Cassaday:     Yeah, that's one of the biggest surprises in the set.

Brian:     That's so funny. And so these are when you're playing two and three hour sets, just you and your guitar, you're tossing these covers into it?

Chris Cassaday:     Yeah.

Brian:     You have anything that you don't cover, that's in your music collection that you're a fan of, but you don't necessarily cover? Or do you really play it all?

Chris Cassaday:     I try to play it all. My setlist is always super diverse. I try to like, surprise you with the next song, you know? It could be anything, you never know.

Brian:     God, that's amazing. I can't wait to catch another one of these shows, man. Now, do you have any rules that you always end up breaking? That you've set for yourself?

Chris Cassaday:     Not drinking the night before a big show.

Brian:     And is that because of peer pressure, or just because, you know, a beer sounds good, or ...

Chris Cassaday:     A little bit of both, yeah. Also, going to bed on time. "I've got to go to bed on time!" No, it's-

Brian:     Alright, so it's "I'm not going to drink" and "I'm going to go to bed on time," and "I'm not going to be hungover before the show." Except, that might happen.

Chris Cassaday:     Yeah, you never know. But, it can affect you big time, you know. I've learned the hard way, and I'm always like, "Now you know! Don't do it." And then I just ...

Brian:     Right, and then it happens again. Oh, that's really funny. So now, one of my favorite questions to ask, actually I've got, I'm going to do this one in two parts. What is the best piece of advice you have ever gotten from someone? And this can be in general, it doesn't have to be music.

Chris Cassaday:     Best piece of advice I've ever gotten from someone was, Dave Matthews, who said, in an interview he said, "Play for anyone you can, anywhere you can, at any time. You never know who's going to hear you."

Brian:     That's amazing. And is there like a story that comes to mind as to like, someone you've ended up playing for that, that was a surprise?

Chris Cassaday:     Well, I mean, the way I started getting all of these gigs was, I went to an open mic on like a Monday night out in Sterling and a promoter guy by the name of Dave [Mastell 00:09:40] heard me and started booking me at pubs and restaurants, and that's how I started booking these big gigs, was through him. And I just happened to be at that open mic at that night and he heard me, and now I'm, paid gigs on the way. You never know what's going to happen or who's going to be there.

Brian:     Wow. That's amazing. And, are you entirely a musician? Do you have other jobs, like part-time jobs as well?

Chris Cassaday:     By day I am a financial planning administrator at a wealth management firm. And then by night I'm a singer-songwriter.

Brian:     Fantastic. See, and I love it; and you know, sometimes we, I don't want to say "joke" about it, but sometimes I feel like there is this conception that, "Oh, well no I do have a day job." But what's amazing is that so many folks in the DC region that, very, a lot of folks have that same story, they work during the day and then they play shows at night, and they really are incredible at both of them, which is kind of, it's amazing to see, so that's awesome, man.

Chris Cassaday:     Thanks man.

Brian:     Alright, so now what's one piece of advice you would offer?

Chris Cassaday:     "Practice makes perfect," is what I always say. My bandmates hate me because I'm all about practicing, I'm like-

Brian:     So say more on that; what does that mean?

Chris Cassaday:     I mean, just practice as much as you can. There's no, you can never practice too much, in my mind. There's nothing wrong with being overly prepared for your shows.

Brian:     So what does that look like in, does that mean you play with the band but then you go home and play for two more hours?

Chris Cassaday:     You've got to, in a band particularly, you've got to practice on your own, not just band practice.

Brian:     Yeah.

Chris Cassaday:     You know, working on your own so when you get together with the group, everybody's done their part, you know?

Brian:     And when you practice, is there a certain like, do you break down the parts? Like do you play one segment at a time over and over again until you nail that one perfectly? Do you break it up, or ...

Chris Cassaday:     It's usually like, I'll listen to the whole song, if it's a cover. And then I'll just try to play the whole song. And if I get stuck at a part I'll fast forward to that part, learn it, et cetera et cetera.

Brian:     And then rewind that one part until you can play that, and then you play it all the way through.

Chris Cassaday:     Exactly.

Brian:     Wow. That's amazing. Alright. Now, for those folks who are interested in learning more about you and the cool things happening, where do they go?

Chris Cassaday:     Well, you can check me out on Facebook, Facebook.com/ChrisCassadayMusic; it's got all my info on my shows. All social media, for that matter, Instagram @ChrisCassadayMusic, Twitter.

December 20, 2016 - Special Guest: Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents

^^Episode Is Live Now - Click Above (might take time to buffer/load, refresh page if issue)^^

National Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcherPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM TODAY'S SHOW

NEWS

MUSIC

  1. Prozac & Merlot - The Sea Life (Rock/Garage Rock)
  2. Sleigh Ride - Wylder (Rock/Pop)
  3. The Wild and Beyond - Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents (Rock/Folk Rock)
  4. Small Blade - Stranger in the Alps (Folk)
  5. Antelope - Louis Weeks (Pop/Electronic)
  6. Home - Cynthia Marie (Pop/Jazz Folk)
  7. Kool Kids - Justin Trawick (Bluegrass)
  8. Intro/Outro music by Fellowcraft (Hard Rock/Blues)

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


AARON TINJUM AND THE TANGENTS

VIDEO - BIO - PHOTOS - TRANSCRIPT

BIO

DC's Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents released their new full-length album Foreign & Domestic earlier this year with a release show at Rock & Roll Hotel. The folk rock project originally formed in Austin, Texas where they were recognized by the Austin Mayor and City Council with their own official band holiday holiday. Since relocating to DC in 2013, they have opened for the likes of James McCartneyKawehi and Sam Amidon

LINKS

www.aarontinjum.com 

www.facebook.com/AaronTinjum

www.twitter.com/AaronTinjum 

www.soundcloud.com/AaronTinjum

www.youtube.com/TinjumAndTheTangents

aaron tinjum dc music rocks

The new animated music video they discussed in the episode:


INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:     D.C.'s Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents released their new, full length album, Foreign and Domestic, earlier this year, with a release show at Rock and Roll hotel. The folk rock group originally from Austin, Texas, where they were recognized by the city mayor and the city council with their own official band holiday. They relocated back up to D.C., and we consider ourselves so lucky to have them here back in 2013, and are continuing that great tradition of awesome music up here in D.C.

                  Guys, I first heard of these guys when they ... I stumbled across them online, they submitted their stuff to me, I was listening. I saw the bit about ... If you haven't seen, there was a video, what we talked about on October 11th, is their official band holiday in Austin, TX. On October 11th this year, I did a little info about them and posted a video about that experience. Basically, just really cool stuff happening.

                  Bottom line is, listen, it's a great pleasure for me to introduce Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents. I've got Aaron Tinjum and Andrew Cote with me, so say "Hi" guys.

Aaron:   Hey Brian, thanks for having us. 

Andrew:                Yes, thank you so much. 

Brian:     Aaron and Andrew. Tell us about, I'm curious right off the bat, where is Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents? Where did the name come from?

Aaron:   We originally formed in Austin, Texas about five years ago. As I was putting together the project with some of the other members, we were doing what every band does, debating what we should call ourselves. 

Brian:     Yup, happens a lot. 

Aaron:   I don't think any of the members wanted full ownership over the song since I was writing over them, they didn't want to be associated with my saddest emotions.

Brian:     Oh, okay. 

Aaron:   We conducted a Facebook poll, and the Tangents was the ultimate winner. I'm not sure that's a solid methodology for selecting a band name, but that's what won and that's what stuck ever since.

Brian:     Got it, so it was a Facebook poll. I love that, all right. Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents. How did you guys come together. 

Aaron:   It's been a gradual process. Originally started with our latest album we released earlier this year, Foreign and Domestic. We had six players on that with Andrew on drums over here. Andrew was found here in D.C. at the Treehouse Lounge.

Brian:     Nice. 

Aaron:   He was playing for us and we were looking for a new drummer, having relocated out here. We had a violinist, Katie Smith. Bass player also moved from Austin, Andrew Berglund. Andrew introduced us to a great pianist, David Chavez, who plays on the album. Our banjo player who didn't move out to D.C., still in Austin, recorded remotely, but actually came up for the album release show.

Andrew:                We're working on getting him moving out here soon. 

Brian:     Very cool. How do you convince people to come to D.C. Is Austin ... I've heard great things about, in D.C., they talk about great things about Austin. What made you move to D.C.?

Aaron:   I'd love to take credit for convincing other people to move to D.C., I don't think I can do that. I think musically, compared to Austin, you have a very supportive community here. Not that you don't have that in Austin, but in Austin, everyone's a musician. 

Brian:     Got it. 

Aaron:   Your audience is full of musicians, whereas here, you might have a real, live listening audience that isn't critiquing your every chord.

Brian:     I guess that's good. It's a good place to move. What about on a personal side, you guys, outside of Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents, what's life like for you guys? What do you do?

Andrew:                I guess I can jump in here. I work professionally as a musician, but, you know, you've experienced Brian, that takes many different forms. I teach at George Mason University. I work in the School of Music there, as well as the Honors college. I teach classes ranging from ear training to Intro to Research Methods, and kind of everything in between.

Brian:     Wow.

Andrew:                Yeah, I do that, then I also work at church, in Fairfax, Virginia. I direct the choirs there. I'm sort of Composer in Residence as well, so I do a lot of arranging and composing and so-

Brian:     Got it.

Andrew:                Yeah. 

Brian:     Drums is your main instrument, but clearly you play a lot more.

Andrew:                Yeah. I'm trained as a percussionist, but in high school, I learned how to play guitar, kind of self taught. Same thing with bass and piano. Just from there, I studied music education and I kind of was on a one way trajectory to do music and had been able to piece together a living doing it.

Brian:     That's amazing. I love the fact that you're doing it. I'm a drummer too, but I got a day job. I can imagine that it's a big leap of faith to get started and probably a challenge and some struggles sometimes, but it has to be pretty rewarding too, and I admire you for that.

Andrew:                Thanks. Supportive wife has helped. 

Brian:     Shout out to the supportive wife.

Andrew:                That's right. She has a day job, so that's also helping.

Brian:     It's a team effort. 

Andrew:                That's right.

Brian:     I got it. I love it. Okay guys. Aaron, you skipped out on that, what about you outside of music? Are you [crosstalk 00:05:14] what else is there to Aaron? 

Aaron:   For my day job, you have to fund your musical and creative endeavors somehow.

Brian:     Got it.

Aaron:   I'm a writer full time working in clean energy. I actually work remotely in D.C.

Brian:     Wow. Where's the headquarters? 

Aaron:   Headquarter house in Ivy City.

Brian:     Ivy City? 

Aaron:   Yeah, it's a great, creative community up there. 

Brian:     It seems like it, absolutely. Where, for those listening who don't know where Ivy City is, which Ivy City are we talking about?

Aaron:   The one in Far Northeast Washington D.C.

Brian:     Got it. You're working remotely from a couple miles away.

Aaron:   Correct. 

Brian:     Okay, I'm clear. Okay. Very cool. Funniest moments from you guys performing, or funniest moment that comes to mind.

Andrew:                Really you kind of glossed over how we met Aaron, which I thought was pretty funny.

Aaron:   I'm sorry.

Andrew:                It's okay. I mean, it's a big introduction right? No. Anyways, I was playing drums that night for another D.C. based artist. A woman by the name of Sally [inaudible 00:06:17]. Her and I met, actually though the church that I work at now. She's an amazing Singer/Songwriter, so definitely, I would recommend if you have some time, listening for her music.

                  Anyways, I was playing for her and Aaron come up to me after a set and said, "Hey, do you want to sit in a play drums with us?" I guess about a week prior to that their other drummer just didn't show up for a gig and that was just kind of the end of the time there.

                  Anyways, long story short, we end up meeting then and it turns out they were heading just the next couple of weeks, to go into the studio to start working on this album, Foreign and Domestic. A couple days later, we were in the basement of my townhouse at that time and we started writing this music.

Brian:     Wow. You literally started playing with them when you were on stage?

Andrew:                Yeah, absolutely. The fee was great on the first gig. 

Brian:     Love it, oh my God. What a crazy story. What about success moments that comes to mind? What's the biggest success moment?

Aaron:   Success-wise, I would say definitely being on your program today.

Brian:     Stop it. Stop it. That's, no.

Aaron:   This is as high as we get.

Brian:     You don't get away with that. Give me another one. I want a story. 

Aaron:   Back in Austin-

Brian:     I appreciate it. 

Aaron:   Like you mentioned, we wound up somewhat hilariously getting our own band holiday playing a wide range of random venues from furniture stores, to dive bars, coffee houses, the airport, used clothing shops.

Brian:     Holy smokes. All right. 

Aaron:   Keeping Austin weird, that's one way they do it. Every month, they give away one or two holidays by official proclamations by the Mayor and City Council. That's definitely been up there. Since we've been playing out in D.C., we've opened up for a few great acts at Jammin Java like Sam Amidon, who just played [inaudible 00:08:07] Festival in [inaudible 00:08:09] Wisconsin.

Brian:     Okay. 

Aaron:   Kawehi who's like a looping legend now on YouTube, just turning up the covers. Then Paul McCartney's son, James, we opened for him back in June.

Brian:     Wow, that's wild. I'm curious about the holiday thing. Do you get put in for that? Does someone nominate you? Do they pick names out of a hat? How does that work. 

Aaron:   They have their own, at least when we did it, there was an application system and we were ultimately chosen. You have to kind of show what you've been doing in the scene. All the places you've played, how often you've played. At that time, we were playing a very long string of gigs. 

Brian:     Right, go for it. I love it. What rules do you always break? 

Andrew:                That's a good question. Aaron, why don't you jump in first? 

Aaron:   I would say, unconsciously, first off, we do mostly soft rock. Soft rock isn't notorious for breaking a whole lot of rules, you know? We like to follow the rules.

But I would say, unconsciously, I'm probably the Jar Jar Binks of guitar rhythm. I'm very not good at that and that drive Andrew crazy. That's definitely one rule I'm breaking all the time.

Brian:     The rhythm rule.

Aaron:   I'm consistent with it.

Brian:     It's good, you're reliable about that, I like it. Okay.

Andrew:                I think, my go to thing is just adding more layers to it. Coming up with different string parts or piano, or adding, you know, they're just different layers always kind of being that ... I don't even know if it's just Devil's Advocate, but just always saying, "Okay, what can we do to shape this a little bit more." Yeah, Aaron beats up on himself a little too much with the rhythm thing. I'm the only one counting I guess.

Aaron:   Andrew's the one, and the rest of the band, all the Tangents make all the songs actually good. I just kind of come up with the idea and they polish and clean it for me.

Brian:     Got it. It's cool, especially when bands come together and they do that together, it's cool to hear. It's a cool effect too to be in those rehearsals I think.

What about one thing you've got in your music collection that would surprise us?

Andrew:                Well, I have sort of a weird, strange instrument collection, but my new favorite toy is an instrument call the Otamatone, which is a Japanese instrument. It's basically, if you were to combine a digitalized slide whistle with just this crazy, animated looking face, that's this weird sound. Long story short, it's a synthesizer toy that's like $20, that I've definitely gotten at least $100 worth of entertainment out of.

Brian:     What about artists or interesting music that you listen to that would surprise us?

Aaron:   I've been doing this whole, you know, the cheesy 30 things to do before you turn 30.

Brian:     Excellent.

Aaron:   I've been doing that more from an album perspective. I have a very eclectic mix going right now, where everything from Sketches of Spain by Miles Davis, to if you've watched Westworld at all, they have a soundtrack with all of the player piano tracks, the cover songs going on in the background, which is pretty cool.

Brian:     Oh yeah.

Aaron:   Other than that, Bruce Springsteen's, Nebraska. Tim by The Replacements. I'm going for a wide range right now.

Brian:     The last question that I love to ask is, what's one piece of advice that you would offer?

Aaron:   Andrew's the professor so I'll let him take this one

Brian:     Profess to us Andrew.

Andrew:                That's another really big, tough question. I guess if, I know this is kind of a cliché, but just taking risks. I think a lot of the real fun that's come out of the recording process, working with Aaron and just really any musical endeavor I've taken, has been the uncertain ones that have gone it. There's never been anything really, that I've been super duper proud of, that came out of, "I'm doing this because I know this is safe."

                  I think it's just a matter of really just taking that sort of risk and seeing where it goes. Failing a ton, more often than not, and then just keep pushing and seeing where that leads. Everything is also connected as well. All the failure is connected to the positive stuff as well.

Brian:     That's true. You got to take those risks. For those folks who are interested in finding out more about you guys, where do they go if they want to follow you? What are the best places to find you guys?

Aaron:   You can find us pretty much everywhere. We've got our website, www.aarontinjum, or aarontinjumandthetangents.com, or on Facebook, Twitter, SoundCloud, Spotify, Itunes, Amazon, YouTube, Tinder.

Brian:     All those places.

Aaron:   Any of those places.

Brian:     Okay, got it. You got anything? I know you got some stuff over there. Andrew you got any places that if they want to follow you specifically?

Andrew:                Yeah, for sure. I'm on Twitter and Facebook as well. I have a website for those of you who are classical saxophone enthusiasts, I have an album coming out in the next couple of days of some of the chamber compositions that I have and that can be found at AndrewCodyMusic.com.

August 9, 2016 - Special Guest: Christian of Capital City Showcase

^^Episode Is Live Now - Click Above (might take time to buffer/load, refresh page if issue)^^

National Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcherPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice


MUSIC FROM TODAY'S SHOW

  1. Native Deen - M-U-S-L-I-M (Hip-Hop/R&B)
  2. Nappy Riddem - Rastar (Funk/Hip-Hop)
  3. Bells and Hunters - Weddings and Funerals (Rock)
  4. Rachel Levitin - Secret's Safe (Pop/Rock/Indie Rock)
  5. Yellowtieguy - War (Should I Be So Surprised) (Rock)
  6. Adrian Krygowski - Elbow Grease (Country/Bluegrass/Folk)
  7. Justin Trawick & The Common Good - Goodbye (Bluegrass/Rock/Americana)

Live Music Venue Spotlight (as discussed on the show, site of this week's Capital City Showcase): Atlas Brew Works


Christian of The Capital City Showcase

Video - Bio - Photos

Christian Hunt DC Music Rocks

The Capital City Showcase is the variety show that features the best performing artists in the DC area.  Hosted by comedian and life-long Washingtonian Christian Hunt, the Showcase has featured some of the best stand-up comedians, improv comedians, storytellers, rock and funk bands, acoustic singer-songwriters, and hip-hop artists in the scene.  For over five years, we have put the spotlight on DC's vibrant arts scene and shown the DMV is a premiere place for top-level talent.  Showcase performers have toured across the country and been featured on national television programs such as The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon, Conan, Last Comic Standing, and The Voice

Website:  http://capitalcityshowcase.com

Facebook: http://facebook.com/capitalcityshowcase

Twitter:  http://twitter.com/CapCityShowcase

Youtube:  http://youtube.com/capitalcityshowcase

Instagram:  http://instagram.com/capitalcityshowcase

Snapchat: CapCityShowcase

The Premier Episode!

July 5th 2016

The world premier episode, and it was a blast!  There isn't an audio recording of this first show, it was only a live radio broadcast and will be fondly remembered by those that were there listening live!  Here's the songs and links to the bands that were featured, definitely a delight to highlight the huge talents featured in that very first show!