Viewing entries tagged
His Dream Of Lions

5/9/17 - Conrad Osipowicz, Founder and Owner of Blue Room Recording Studio

Big thanks to Conrad for joining us on the show this week!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might take time to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcherPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

FROM TODAY'S SHOW

MUSIC

  1. Brighter Day by Caroline Ferrante (Indie/Americana)
  2. Danger Close by His Dream of Lions (Pop/Rock)
  3. Down by Jen Miller (Indie/Indie Pop)
  4. Carolina by Hello Dharma (Pop/R&B)
  5. Back Where I Started by Pressing Strings (Folk/Rock)
  6. I'm Okay by Nelly's Echo (Pop/Soul)

ANNOUNCEMENTS

NEW RELEASES

THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

SEE THE FULL CALENDAR - You can even filter to shows nearby!  We hope you'll go to one!

Fri May 12

Lesson Zero @ Rhodeside Grill in Arlington, VA
Olivia Mancini & Run Come See @ Rock & Roll Hotel in DC

Sat May 13

Kingman Island Bluegrass Fest
The Split Seconds, Derek Evry, 9 to 5, and Fellowcraft @ VFW Post 9274 in Falls Church, VA

Sun May 14

Veronneau @ Villain & Saint in Bethesda, MD

Mon May 15

Thievery Corporation w/ Orchestra @ Kennedy Center in DC

Tues May 16

Lanternfish, Technicians @ Black Cat in DC

Wed May 17

Ken Wenzel @ Ireland’s 4 Courts in Arlington, VA

Thurs May 18

Backbeat Underground @ Villain & Saint in Bethesda, MD

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-



CONRAD OSIPOWICZ

VIDEO - BIO - LINKS - TRANSCRIPT

The Blue Room Live Video Link Brian and Conrad discussed: https://www.facebook.com/blueroommusicstudio/videos/1453223031355708/

Bio:

Conrad founded Blue Room Productions in 2009 after graduating Magna cum Laude from Emerson College in Boston, MA with achievements in audio/radio production and entrepreneurial studies. While living in Boston, Conrad acted as the Live Mix Director for WERS 88.9 FM, one of the largest stations broadcasting to the New England area and online around the world.

As a producer and engineer, Conrad has continued to push his boundaries by attending workshops, master classes and industry conferences which have taken him as far as Avignon, France, attending the Mix With the Masters seminar with legendary grammy-award winning engineer Chris Lord-Alge. As an experienced producer with over 13 years of experience and a veteran drummer, Conrad is one of the most versatile and respected producers in the DC area, as well as being a voting member for the Grammy’s. He’s also a member of the Audio Engineering Society, a society comprised of leading audio engineers and scientists as well as the Washington D.C. chapter of the Grammy Foundation.

 

Conrad playing drums for his Tool Tribute Band which he discussed on this episode.

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:     On DC Music Rocks, we're shining a spotlight on the great songs and incredible people behind the DC region's music scene. Now, let's get to know one of those incredible people. We have Conrad, who founded Blue Room Productions in 2009 after graduating from Emerson College in Boston, Massachusetts, in audio and radio production and entrepreneurial studies. While living in Boston, Conrad acted as the live mix director for WERS 88.9, which is what you mentioned earlier with Thievery Corporation, that's where you came across them, so the Boston connection. It's one of the largest stations broadcasting to the New England area, and online around the world, so as an experienced producer with over 13 years of experience, and a veteran drummer, Conrad is one of the most versatile and respected producers in the DC area as well as being a voting member of the Grammys. That's what everyone wants to know, right? Are you a voting member of the Grammys? This man is one of those people. He is also a member of the Audio Engineering Society and overall great guy.

      I first came across Conrad when my band, we had entered into the competition for a Whammy, for the Washington Area Music Awards, and my album got picked up as a possibility for that. Conrad heard the album, and he reached out, and wanted to do ... He has something awesome called Blue Room Live, which we'll talk about here in the interview, but I got to participate in it. I'll be sure to share that video with you, because that was a cool experiece. It's awesome he's sharing those videos. It turns out, by the way, he's an awesome guy, so afterwards it was like, "All right, Conrad, I want you to come on the show man, let's talk to you." Listeners it's with great pleasure that I get to formally introduce Conrad.

Conrad:     Thanks very much, thanks for having me and thanks for your kind words.

Brian:     Thanks for being here. Now, one of the things I want to know, first, I want to know why is it called Blue Room?

Conrad:     The first studio, I have one location in Maryland and one in Virginia, the original Blue Room Studio, the walls were blue before I arrived. It was a empty room with a carpet and these funky red lips couches, no recording equipment, no vocal booth, and the walls were blue, so the name kind of stuck for the last seven, eight years.

Brian:     Became the Blue Room.

Conrad:     It sure did.

Brian:     There you go. That's really funny. At what point did you ... It wasn't when you first moved in you called it the Blue Room, then it became, ultimately, a business name.

Conrad:     Yeah.

Brian:     When did it go from the nickname to the real name?

Conrad:     I never knew even the name would last or stick around and it would be as notable as it is now, but even the second studio in Virginia, all the walls are painted blue in all of the rooms, the isolation room, control room, everything is blue. It fit.

Brian:     It became for real then. That's amazing, all right. Now talk about, for those listeners who don't know, I was talking about Blue Room Live. Tell them what that is and where that came from.

Conrad:     Absolutely.

Brian:     Talk about that.

Conrad:     Well were trying to follow similar to your footsteps, we want to support local music, and be a hub for local DC musicians to meet at our studio, to connect with each other, to perform their original songs, and to get out there into the environment. It's difficult now, in 2017, it's a completely different landscape as far as promoting your live music, so we're trying to give local talent an opportunity to perform and stream live in our studio to Facebook, or YouTube, to have a great avenue to get out to their fans and friends.

Brian:     That is really cool. Where did the idea come from for that? Was that ...

Conrad:     I'm very much into technology, I'm a nerd, and a geek at heart. Hybrid musician and nerd, so recording engineer worked out.

Brian:     I appreciate your honesty sir.

Conrad:     [inaudible 00:03:29]

Brian:     It's that nerd thing.

Conrad:     I'm very much into emerging technology, things which are right over the horizon. I'm just now getting heavy into 3D and VR, being able to broadcast a live concert from our studio in VR and to the goggles people wear around the country, around the world.

Brian:     Wow.

Conrad:     Maybe six, nine months ago, I knew that Facebook and YouTube, they're investing into infrastructure for live streaming, but up until a certain point you could only stream with your phone. Trying to find a way to do it with multiple camera angles, a very high quality audio mix from ProTools, everything done live on the fly like a radio show, like today. There's a lot of added pressure, it's a much different mentality verses just booking the studio for a session and recording, recording as many takes as you want. There's really a lot more added pressure when you're trying to hit that live broadcast, as you know.

Brian:     Yeah, absolutely. I mean, we do it live on here and then we also share the recording, but same thing with Blue Room Live too. If you got to the Blue Room ... The Facebook tag is ...

Conrad:     BlueRoomLive.com will take you right to our Facebook site where those streams occur, BlueRoomMusicStudio.com tells you all about our studio, and Blue Room Live takes you right to the archive of all of our previous live streams.

Brian:     Awesome, so definitely, they've had some amazing groups that have been on there. By all means check out fellow crafter, Black Alley was the one right after us, I thought that was amazing. They do incredible sound because it's a recording studio.

Conrad:     You got it.

Brian:     You guys really do justice to how awesome the sound is of these bands.

Conrad:     We care about that too, I'm not satisfied with someone streaming off the internal mic on their iPhone, I want to have a high quality stream to listen to. Band like Black Alley, last month, we had 6,500 simultaneous viewers tuning in from our tiny study in Herdon, Virginia. It was a blessing and we're hoping to do that all summer long.

Brian:     Now the musicians, I've had a couple musicians ask me, because they thought it was incredible, which it did, if they were interested in signing up for that ...

Conrad:     Sure.

Brian:     ... or getting to know. What's the best way for them to reach you for that?

Conrad:     I encourage any local groups to contact us to do a live stream, or just to chat, and to talk about a potential project, or any way we can collaborate, and support, and be a hub for musicians in the area. The best thing is just give us a call or send us an email, it's info@BlueRoomMusicStudio.com. Feel free to send samples of your work, any information you can share about the group, your experience recording and performing in the DC area, and we'd be happy to host you.

Brian:     Yeah that's awesome, very cool. Kind of right now, what about ... Now I know you're also a musician too, so talk about that. What are you into with music around here?

Conrad:     I've been a drummer for about 17 years so far.

Brian:     [inaudible 00:06:11] high five on the drummer thing.

Conrad:     High five on drums.

Brian:     That's it, all right.

Conrad:     Team drummer here.

Brian:     Yeah.

Conrad:     That's really my primary instrument, I can hang on guitar and bass as well, but I'd say at least more recently over the last few years, my primary passion, my primary instrument seems to be the mixer in the recording studio. That's where I live most of the time.

Brian:     that's a very powerful instrument. It should not be overlooked, that's for sure.

Conrad:     Agreed.

Brian:     Now, so you play around town now. How did the Tool tribute band, how did that start?

Conrad:     I play in a band called Wild Eyes, we're a Tool tribute group. We've been performing for over four years already in New York, Virginia, Baltimore area. I'm into not just loud, aggressive, screaming metal, but something that's a bit more powerful, something with something interesting to listen to, especially in the rhythm department as you can imagine. I'm into music with a lot of polyrhythms, a lot of double bass, a lot of kind of unique blue notes, and odd type signatures, and strange maybe non-typical western music you might hear on the radio. Tool is right up my alley. We play these epic songs from maybe seven to maybe 15 minutes long. There are these long twisted epic songs that we idolize these guys, I'm actually going to see them perform three times in 10 days in DC, New York, and Boston, in two weeks.

Brian:     Wow.

Conrad:     It will be really cool. I will be loaded on Tool.

Brian:     That's cool. All right, so you go see some shows. Now what else with what you're doing ... Talk about outside of music now, and outside of the studio, who is Conrad outside of that? Hobbies, what do you do outside of that?

Conrad:     Not much. I'm so heavy, I'm so passionate into audio engineering, into high fidelity, high quality, high resolution audio and video, that's a really a passion of mine. All my friends are musicians, whenever I have free time I'm always going to shows at any venue in the DC area. I've been to the Fillmore twice already this month. I've there all the time, seeing shows downtown, Velvet Lounge, Black Cat, DC 9, trying to not only meet other musicians, but trying to support my friends, and their shows, and they support me and my endeavor, and my studio, so I try to pay it back, as you're doing also.

Brian:     Now I can't let you get away with just saying more music, so tell us something else man. What else is outside? Is there a certain TV show you like, are you a hardcore workout guy, is there any ... Do you have pets at home, or any kind ... What's outside of it.

Conrad:     I have a beautiful German Shepherd, Silver, that I adore. I try to get to the gym when I can every now and then. I don't have cable TV, so I don't even watch that much TV, just a little Apple TV now and then. The majority of my time and love, which gets me out of bed every day is running my business, running the studios, mixing, mastering, meeting new clients, traveling when I can. I'm very involved and very active in the DC chapter of the Grammys, and go to all of their events, and panel discussions. I'm quite active in the AES, Audio Engineering Society, a group of professional engineers and producers. I travel to all of their affairs and expos in LA and New York. I've been to the Grammys five times already, so I travel to LA every year and vote on the ballot and try to stay very active in my community.

Brian:     I think you succeed in that, so it's not just trying, I definitely think you succeed. Now talk about what's something in your music collection that might surprise us?

Conrad:     I try to be extremely open when people, you ask people, "What kind of music do you listen to?" They say, "I listen to everything." I really try to listen to everything. I try to be well versed and try to listen to top charting songs on Spotify, even styles I may not typically reach for, it doesn't have to be rock, it doesn't have to be metal, I listen to pop songs, jazz, folk, country, gospel, blues, reggae, because I have to be familiar with those genres. My clients expect that kind of contemporary sound, or maybe they're looking for a older vintage sound, who knows?

Brian:     Got it.

Conrad:     I try to be extremely well versed, like a chef who might cook all different types of cuisine around the world. I want to be the same capacity as a recording engineer, very well versed.

Brian:     You're well versed, is there one that surprises you that's in your music collection?

Conrad:     You know, I'd say while I enjoy working with pop singers, and individual singer song writers who maybe play guitar and sing, or play piano and sing, I always gravitate towards working with bands, and recording live instruments. I much always ... I prefer to set up a live drum set, and mic it up, and track live drums instead of resorting to drum loops, or sequencing, or using some midi synthesizer or something like that to ... As far as strange genres, I really don't have any. I'm extremely neutral. Even country music, and hip hop, and jazz, and every perspective, I try to do it all. A bunch of my friends invited me to see deadmau5 at Merriweather Post in Columbia. I don't go to too many EDM shows, or electronic shows, so that was something different for me.

Brian:     You were there?

Conrad:     I was there.

Brian:     Awesome.

Conrad:     I was there seeing with the animations, and the subs, and the lasers, and fog, and everything, and it was pretty wild. I was the guy in the back with the custom earplugs in my ear, protecting my ears. I'm usually that guy.

Brian:     Yep, absolutely. Hey listen, custom earplugs, if you like live music, or you work with live music, custom earplugs, or at least hi-fi earplugs are definitely a great investment.

Conrad:     Agreed.

Brian:     I'm glad you're doing that.

Conrad:     Critical.

Brian:     Now, earliest memory with music.

Conrad:     Well I started playing drums at age 12, I certainly remember growing listening to whatever my parents, my family, was playing, driving in my dad's blue Nissan ZX300, listening to Deep Purple. Of course he's a big fan of the Beatles too, so those were heavy influences in me too. I started playing piano for about a year or two, and took a lot of lessons, but at age 10 or 11 it's difficult to really stick with it. As soon as I tried drums, and even sitting at the kitchen table, and my dad was trying to demo, and grill me, and see if I can play simple rhythms on the table. I did, and I passed, so he said, "All right, let's sign you up for drum lessons." From age 12 on I've been very deep into percussion and drums. That really carries over even into my career as an audio engineer, because I'm a stickler for timing, and making sure the groove feels correct, and feels proper. Things have to be in tune, and in time, and if the drums aren't feeling right, I sit and analyze, and nudge, the drums around, and force them to get into time. Because nothing bothers me more than a strange, a funky feeling groove. I don't mean funky in a good way, in the bad way.

Brian:     It's funky in the kind of smells way, right? I get you.

Conrad:     There you go.

Brian:     All right now, one of my favorite questions to ask is if you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be?

Conrad:     Networking and connections, especially in smaller markets, not in Nashville, or New York, or LA for example, but in a city like DC, being friendly, being outgoing, and collaborating with other musicians is everything. My business and my career as an engineer, as a musician, as a band mate, wouldn't survive without other people, and without connections and assistance from them too. Going and being active in your community, going to events, whether it's Grammys, or AES, or something else you're interested and passionate about, you got to get up, you got to get out of bed, you got to get dressed and go to these events. A lot of them are Saturday, Sundays, some of them are in different cities, but to go and smile, and pass out business cards, and meet people, you never know who calls you six months, or six years later, and says, "I met you a while ago. You had this metal business card. I need an album to be mixed," or, "I have a song to master," or something like that. You never know who is going to knock on your door.

Brian:     You sound like you have experience with that, is there a story that comes to mind with that one that [inaudible 00:14:29]

Conrad:     I recall the first time I went to the Grammys, which was about five or six years ago, I sat one row in front at the Staples Center in LA with ... There was a reggae artist behind me who we just started talking, and had some time to kill. I gave him my card, and months later he called me and booked me to mix his entire album. That alone, that project alone paid for my whole trip to LA, and all my meetings, and travel, et cetera.

Brian:     That's amazing.

Conrad:     I never knew, I never guessed he would call. I even forgot about him, and he call and said, "I remember, I was sitting behind you at the Grammys at the Staple Center. Let's do some work together." You never know who's going to give you a call.

Brian:     That's amazing. That networking thing, I love it. Now, if folks want to find out more about you and the cool things happening at Blue Room, where do they go?

Conrad:     I encourage you to check out BlueRoomMusicStudio.com, that's the domain for my two studios. One is in Bethesda, Maryland, one in Herndon, Virginia, we're about half an hour from the White House, from downtown Washington. I'd love anyone and everyone to reach out, and if you'd ever like to come by for a studio tour, or need a consultation for your project, I engineer, and I have a few other very talented engineers I'd be happy to introduce you.

April 18, 2017 - Special Guest: Sub-Radio

Big thank you to the incredible guys from Sub-Radio for coming by!

^^Episode Audio/Video/Post Is Live - Click Above (might take time to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcherPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

FROM TODAY'S SHOW

MUSIC

  1. Feint of Heart by Pop Co-op (Pop/Power Pop)
  2. Caroline by Sub-Radio (Indie/Indie Rock)
  3. Insanity by Black Alley (Rock/Hip-Hop)
  4. Hear me out by Underdog Champs (Punk/Pop Punk)
  5. Fireworks in Autumn by Andrew Tufano (Folk/Acoustic)
  6. New Romantics by His Dream of Lions (Pop/Rock)
  7. Emerald Skates by The Duskwhales (Indie/Indie Pop Gypsy Rock)

ANNOUNCEMENTS

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-



SUB-RADIO

VIDEO - BIO - LINKS - TRANSCRIPT

Bio:

DC Music Rocks Sub-Radio

Washington DC's Sub-Radio makes smart, danceable pop rock that's always expanding its boundaries, with elements of funk, folk, and EDM present on their 2016 release Same Train // Different Station. The sextet's high-energy live performances and variety of outstanding vocalists have put them on the map up and down the East Coast. Sub-Radio is composed of Adam Bradley (vocals), Matt Prodanovich (guitar), Mike Chinen (guitar/keyboards), John Fengya (guitar/keyboards), Michael Pereira (drums), and Barry Siford (bass).  The band has garnered comparisons to established pop-rock acts like Maroon 5. Multiple songs have been recognized in national songwriting competitions as Sub-Radio played festivals from New York to North Carolina. Notable festivals include the Cherry Blossom Festival, Celebrate Fairfax, and LAUNCH Music Festival and Conference. The new album, Same Train // Different Station, is available on iTunes, Spotify and all other music outlets. The band is currently playing shows in support of the album up and down the East Coast. 

Links:

https://www.sub-radio.com
http://www.facebook.com/subradioband
http://instagram.com/subradioband
http://twitter.com/subradioband
IMG_8578copy.jpg

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:   Sub-Radio makes smart, danceable, pop rock that's always expanding it's boundaries. Their 2016 release entitled Smart Train Different Station incorporated elements of funk, folk, and EDM. Members include, we got Adam on vocals, Matt on guitar, Mike on guitar and keyboards, John on guitar and keyboards, Michael on drums, and Barry on base. These six guys produce high energy live shows which have become well known and have garnered comparisons to established pop acts, like the big ones like Maroon 5 and such. Great shows from these guys. I first came across them a few months ago. I caught a video for Caroline which is one of their big, it's one of my favorite music videos. They're all in the van. If you check out their profile on dcmusicrocks.com, that's the video I've got for them. Just cool things from these guys. Listeners, it's with great pleasure I get to formally introduce Sub-Radio. Hey guys. Welcome. Now, they can only hear your voices, so tell them who you are. Introduce yourself and what you play. I've got three of them here in the studio. Talk to us.

Michael:   Hey. I am Michael. I'm the drummer.

Adam:   My name is Adam. All I do is sing.

Matt:   My name is Matt and I play guitar.

Brian:   The other three guys who aren't here. Those guys are?

Adam:   Yeah. We are missing, we are a six piece band like you said. We are missing John who plays just about everything for us and probably could play instruments he's never heard of.

Brian:   Okay.

Adam:   We got Mike who plays guitar and keyboards and then Barry is our alterative base player.

Brian:   Got it. Those are the guys. Together you make this magic that is Sub-Radio. Now, tell us how did the band get together. Talk about that story?

Michael:   That's an old one. Matt, you should probably take this one.

Matt:   We go together in high school, actually, so it's been you know, what like 15 years now? It's been a while.

Adam:   It literally has been a decade since we were in high school.

Matt:   We all kind of met up early on and just kind of started jamming out together. Then we realized we should be in a band together in high school, because it was fun.

Brian:   Awesome.

Matt:   We kept playing music together, and here we are 10 years later almost and now we're going to be doing really cool stuff this summer.

Brian:   I applaud you guys for still being together because staying together for that long is an achievement. Congrats on that one guys. Now, the name, Sub-Radio. Where did that come from?

Adam:   The name evolved from an older band name that I won't mention for SEO purposes on the air.

Brian:   You're so politically correct. Thank you sir. I really appreciate it.

Adam:   We had a band name in high school that we weren't really happy with so we reworked it, but essentially where this name came from is the early members of the band choosing random words out of a Best Buy catalog.

Brian:   For real?

Matt:   Oh yeah.

Brian:   A Best Buy catalog?

Matt:   It's real.

Adam:   That's going to be a historic anecdote in like five years when there are no Best Buys left. We'll explain during the story.

Matt:   It could have been Circuit City man.

Brian:   Yeah. Oh man, well all right. Well Best Buy catalog. That's amazing. All right. Now, I was asking you earlier during the break for the listeners, what's the song writing process for you guys? How does it go? Does one person bring a riff? Does somebody write the whole thing? How does that work for you guys?

Michael:   Kind of bounces around from song to song, but generally we'll start with a riff. Matt is often times the riff generator. He's got such a knack for it. Yeah, he's got such good head for it. He'll come to the band with a riff and we'll jam on it. We'll just all improv stuff and Adam will sing a melody. No lyrics yet, but he'll kind of hobble something together and then we'll develop the lyrics later. That's how we've been doing things lately. Or, alternatively Bradley will come to us with chords and lyrics already written and then we'll write the music to it. It's the same kind of process where we jam out, so everyone writes their own parts, which is pretty neat.

Brian:   That's cool. Now, when you're away from the music, talk about you three personally. What do you do outside of music and the band?

Matt:   Personally, I do a lot of other music. It's just kind of all music for me right now. I'm about to graduate college and I'm studying music in college at James Madison University.

Brian:   Shout out to JMU.

Matt:   Yeah.

Brian:   All right cool.

Matt:   Yeah. Outside of the band, I'm just kind of always focused on music stuff. I really like soccer too so I'm a big DC United fan and in the EPL, [inaudible 00:04:48] is my other team. Other than that, yeah it's just all about music.

Brian:   Nice. How about you Adam?

Adam:   Oh the important stuff. Got to get the soccer team shout outs.

Brian:   DC United, yes. You're allowed to shout out to them on this show. Absolutely.

Adam:   I am a distance runner outside of the band. Between the band and between the running, that's about 90% of my waking hours. I've done the Marine Corp Marathon in DC a couple times.

Brian:   Good gracious man. Serious distance running.

Adam:   Distance, emphasis on the distance. Yeah.

Brian:   Got it.

Adam:   I live up in Silver Spring. I'm in an acapella group in DC. I try to, not to be too on the nose, with your show, but I try to get to as many local shows as I can during the week when I'm not playing my own.

Brian:   Awesome. You are allowed those [inaudible 00:05:37], sir. Those are awesome brownie points to have. Yes, local shows. I love it. What about you Michael? What's your thing?

Michael:   By day I am a mechanical engineer so I do design and manufacturing work for a telecommunications company. I do a lot of CNC machining, a lot of laser cutting, water jack kind of stuff. Yeah. That's me during the day.

Brian:   Got it.

Adam:   Peels it off so casually.

Brian:   Then he comes to be a rockstar afterwords.

Michael:   Yeah. I studied physics in school so that's my background.

Brian:   Got it.

Adam:   We're missing the other three STEM majors in the band. They're all out at the office but it's a science heavy group.

Brian:   Yet I love the combination with art. Sometimes scientists and artists, they become both. The people bridge that gap. There's a lot of really smart folks that do music on the side in DC and as a result you get things like Sub-Radio and so many other cool groups that I've got profiles for, just amazing. The technical smarts that also translate into amazing musical, artistic skills.

Adam:   Michael brings all kinds of that stuff into the band. I mean, between rhythmic things and like literally making stuff for the band.

Michael:   Yeah. I've built a few things for the band and I'm going to be building a few like custom things for the band to come. Yeah, I feel like if you're sciency or mathy for some reason that pattern practice from science and math will help you in music, especially as a drummer. A rhythm heavy, I like to focus on rhythms a lot and so it's kind of mathematical.

Brian:   Talk about the biggest success moment that comes to mind for Sub-Radio thus far. What comes to mind on that?

Adam:   Wow. That's got to be pretty recent. I mean, we had a chance back in December at JMU to play with a band called Small Pools.

Brian:   Small Pools?

Adam:   It's a band from California but they are sort of a model that we look to right now. They're playing our genre. They're getting a good deal of success with it. We got to open a show for them on campus, and played to a crowd with, to our surprise, to my surprise anyway, I don't know about you guys, that knew some of our lyrics and was there to see. We played the show with like our idols, this pop rock band that's like making it and touring with cool bands and everything and after the show, the JMU school newspaper writes an article about the show, about the student union board that organized this show. They wrote an article about it. The article is like about how nobody expected the opener to be so good.

Brian:   It's the little things in life, the surprise that the successful moment is when they write how good the opener was.

Adam:   The picture accompanying the Small Pool article is a picture of us playing. It was a cool moment. That was a win-win.

Brian:   That's amazing. I love it. Now, what about your earliest memories with music. Where does music come from for you guys?

Michael:   Oh, that's a very, very good question. I come from a family that with no background in music whatsoever. I'm the only musician of even including all of my extended family. I have a pretty large family and I'm the only dedicated musician. One of the few that plays any instrument at all. I would sit by the radio and listen when I was young. I never had any training but I would listen constantly. I would just sit there and listen. That's kind of my first experience with music.

Brian:   Wow. You guys? What do you got for first experience with music? What comes to mind?

Adam:   In contrast, my dad was in a band in college. Didn't really go anywhere but he was in a band in college. He had like a recording studio in our living room when I was a baby and he was still putting a lot of tracks down and he hid them all from me on our iTunes, our shared iTunes account for years. He didn't want me to find them. There are pictures of me at three years old with the big headphones on in front of a mic. He wanted his son's voice on the track. That and my dad raised me on the standard white guy fare of dad music. Zeppelin and The Who and all that stuff, which was good intro.

Brian:   Yeah. Matt, what about you?

Matt:   Similar to Mike, no one ever in my family at all has ever touched a musical instrument. It was kind of up to me to figure that out by myself. I wasn't really interested at all in music to be honest, until I picked up a guitar around like I want to say middle school. Sixth grade I think I touched my first guitar. Then after that I was just like, I like this.

Brian:   It started with guitar.

Matt:   Then it just went on from there. I started writing songs pretty early and that's what got me into the whole wanting to be in a band thing. That's when I met these guys and just kind of snowballed from there.

Brian:   That's awesome. I got one more question that I always love to ask, and that's to any of you who wants to answer which is, if you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be?

Adam:   Who are we advising?

Brian:   That part's up to you.

Adam:   Future musicians?

Brian:   If you want to, sure.

Adam:   Just one piece of advice, generally.

Michael:   At that Small Pool show, we got the privilege of actually hanging out with the Small Pools guys afterwards. I will pass on a piece of advice that was given to me from their drummer, and their singer, kind of both of them. I heard it from the drummer first. Don't be a jerk. Don't ever in life. You can extend that anywhere but be easy to work with. Don't be a jerk. Just be nice and everyone will have a good time for it.

Adam:   That's kind of the guiding principle of Sub-Radio to this point I think as well.

Brian:   Don't be a jerk.

Michael:   Yeah don't do it. There's no reason.

Brian:   It sounds like a really successful t-shirt campaign too. Don't be a jerk, hashtag. There you go.

Adam:   Oh man. You might have just given us something there.

Brian:   Possible band radio shirt. There you go. Make sure you get the hashtag in there so you can find all the people with the photos, right? Now for those listeners who we're going to jump into some music. For those listeners who are interested, who want to find out more about you guys, where do they go to find out more about Sub-Radio?

Adam:   We have a website. It's sub-radio.com. Obviously, we're on Facebook and Twitter and Instagram all those other apps.

Matt:   You can get our music on Spotify, Sound Cloud. It's up most places you would find music, even on the weird ones like Google Play.

Michael:   CD baby.

Brian:   All the places.