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Hayley Fahey

12/18/18 - Special Guest: The Sidleys

This week on DC Music Rocks, The Sidleys, perform their own eclectic style of melodic, soul-influenced indie rock and shine together onstage with powerful voices, memorable songs and precise musicianship, stops by for a chat.  The episode also features great tracks by Mark Rogers, Hayley Fahey, Johnny and the Headhunters, and Veronneau.

^^ CLICK ABOVE TO LISTEN TO THE WHOLE EPISODE! ^^
Podcast:  
iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your other podcast app of choice.
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The Sidleys

The Sidleys Bio/Links:

Interview Video Link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IkkPvg2iFRI

The Sidleys have been busy performing at some of the most prestigious venues in the mid-Atlantic region including The Fillmore, The Hamilton Live, The Barns at Wolf Trap, Bethesda Blues and Jazz and Villain & Saint as well as festivals and outdoor concert series up and down the East coast.

Their debut album Bittersweet has been well-received by critics and fans alike, gaining a nomination for Pop/Rock album of the year as well as winning an award for best album design from The Washington Area Music Association. The Sidleys' new album The Love You Make was released in June 2017 and has been called 2017's sound of summer by WERA 94.7 FM and Cerphe Colwell MusicPlanet Radio.

www.thesidleys.com

www.facebook.com/thesidleysmusic

www.instagram.com/thesidleys

https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/the-love-you-make/1236370775

The Sidleys
The Sidleys

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. ***No Bigger Fool, by Mark Rogers (Rock, Americana)

  2. Signs, by The Sidleys (Rock, Soul)

  3. Dry Ice, by Hayley Fahey (Rock, Indie Rock)

  4. ***That’s All I Need, by Johnny and the Headhunters (Blues, Rockabilly)

  5. One Note Samba, by Veronneau (Jazz, World)

***The first time we've played this artist for you on the show, & a new artist profile added to our DC Artist Database!  There's new artists every week!

->’This Week’s Dose Of DC Music’ Spotify Playlist<-

->’DC Music Rocks Show’ MEGA Spotify Playlist<-


ANNOUNCEMENTS

Enjoy our Holiday Playlist!  We created it in collaboration with Listen Local First in DC!  Fantastic 4 hour playlist to have on at your holiday events!! Finally a playlist of holiday songs you HAVEN’T already heard for years!  Enjoy the holidays AND support DC’s music scene!
https://open.spotify.com/playlist/7zPjpBtLzDExnPy2iSPx4r


NEW RELEASES THIS WEEK

MUSIC

  • Eli Lev - Way Out West
    5 Song Indie EP, Recommended if you like: Tom Petty, Mumford and Sons, Johnny Cash, Ben Harper, The Lumineers

  • Den-Mate - Den-Mate on Audiotree Live
    6 Song Live Album, Recommended if you like: Yeah Yeah Yeahs, Portishead

  • Da Flame - God Answers Prayers
    14 Song Full Album - Previous Reggae artist we’ve covered now turns more faith based

  • Leo & Cygnus - Sagittarii
    5 song Indie Album - Recommended if you like: Fleetwood Mac

VIDEO


HOT SHOWS LIST THIS WEEK!!

Go see a show! Research shows that it reduces stress and makes you happy!

Dec 21 - Fri
Black Masala & Shamans of Sound @ Union Stage in Washington, DC
Justin Jones @ DC9 Nightclub in Washington, DC
The Sidleys @ Villain & Saint in Bethesda, MD

***Our calendar is the only place to find exclusively DC’s local music scene! Check out all your show options! https://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar/

Dec 22 - Sat
Ugly Sweater Party w Color Palette/Fellowcraft/Coral Benders @ Black Cat in Washington, DC
The Fuss & Yellow Dubmarine @ The Hamilton in Washington, DC

Dec 28 - Fri
Broke Royals, Luke James Shaffer, Reed Appleseed @ Jammin Java in Vienna, VA
Eli Lev & Hayley Fahey Music @ Pearl Street Warehouse for Eli’s Album Release Show in Washington, DC
Moonshine Society @ The Soundry in Columbia, MD

Dec 29 - Sat
Cravin' Dogs @ The Birchmere in Alexandria, VA
Broke Royals & Sub-Radio @ Jammin Java in Vienna, VA
Moogatu @ Union Stage in Washington, DC

Dec 31 - Mon
Seriously, too many shows to pick, visit out calendar to see them all!

Jan 3 - Thu
Two Ton Twig @ Union Stage in Washington, DC

Jan 4 - Fri
Bottled up & Loi Loi @ Songbyrd Music House in Washington, DC

Jan 5 - Sat
Black Alley @ U Street Music Hall in Washington, DC (Hood Rock)
Flasher @ Comet Ping Pong in Washington, DC (Hard Rock)


GREAT RESOURCES & LINKS

LOCAL MUSIC CALENDAR

DC ARTIST DATABASE

ALL OUR PLAYLISTS

Specific playlists we update weekly:

EMAIL SIGNUP LINK - For those who don't already conveniently get all this via email!


SUPPORT US ON PATREON

Do you like what we're doing?  Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  There’s little give aways, but for us to evolve this online platform to cover even more we really need funds and support. We're giving away shirts, and more too!  We can do so much more with your support!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **Chad Lesch** **M4TR**


Advertisers/Sponsors

Interested in spreading the word to our more than 12,000 DC region followers?


8/28/18 - Special Guest: Rorie

This week on DC Music Rocks, Rorie, a singer-songwriter, known for "crafting music that tells stories of both heartache and hope," stops by for a chat with host Brian Nelson-Palmer.  The episode also features great tracks by Loi Loi, Throwing Plates, Emily Henry, and Hayley Fahey.

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your other podcast app of choice.

Tell Siri, Alexa, or Google Home "Play the podcast DC Music Rocks"!

 
Rorie

Rorie Bio/Links:

Rorie is a singer-songwriter, crafting music that tells stories of both heartache and hope. Known for poetic lyrics and ambient vocals, Rorie and her band create a captivating live music experience that is uplifting and emotional. Her newest EP, ‘Dawn’ is a lush combination of electro and cinematic pop, while still maintaining her signature, singer-songwriter sound.

 

'Dawn' charted in the iTunes singer-songwriter top 10, and her debut EP, ‘Singing & Silence,’ was featured in the iTunes Singer-Songwriter New Artist Spotlight. Prior to this, Rorie released a single, “Restore,” which was funded by 98 Kickstarter backers. The song was inspired by her time working for an anti-human trafficking non-profit, and has resulted in bi-annual donations to organizations that are doing this important work.

website: https://www.roriemusic.com/

facebook: https://www.facebook.com/roriemusic

instagram: https://www.instagram.com/roriemusic/

twitter: https://twitter.com/roriemusic

youtube: https://www.youtube.com/roriemusicofficial

Rorie
Rorie_byKurtHeyde.jpg

Email Signup Link
For those who don't already conveniently get all this via email!


FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. ***Responsabilidades, by Loi Loi (Indie, Synth Pop)

  2. Gold, by Rorie (Pop, Singer-Songwriter)

  3. For You (I'll Take the Rain), by Throwing Plates (Rock, Pop)

  4. Hands, by Emily Henry (Pop, Acoustic)

  5. Out There, by Hayley Fahey (Rock, Indie Rock)

***The first time we've played this artist for you on the show, & a new artist profile added to our DC Artist Database!  There's new artists every week!

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


ANNOUNCEMENTS

Locally Grown DC - Full season 4 complete!  If you like videos, check out this season of local artists.  Shout out to Chip Py for having bands in his “Yarden” to perform.
http://www.locallygrowndc.com/

*************************

930 Club Festival Updates and Results:

  1. Check out instagram, some great photos on the hashtag specifically:  https://www.instagram.com/explore/tags/dcmusicrocks930

  2. Thanks to Parklife DC for the festival writeup and photos, if you haven’t seen it already, it’s linked here:
    https://parklifedc.com/2018/08/24/snapshots-dc-music-rocks-festival-930-club-8-18-18/

  3. Tickets Sold In Advance Follow-up - We surveyed the 500 people who voted for the singer songwriters for this years festival on how far in advance do people generally buy their tickets to local shows.  Stephen Donoway asked if we’d share what actually happened with our festival, below are the numbers and here are our takeaways:

    1. To Artists/Show Organizers:

      1. If you’re expecting a crowd, make sure doors are at least 30 mins prior to show start to allow people to wait in line to purchase tickets and still get in in-time.  

    2. To Fans:

      1. If you know you’re going to go - buy your tickets in advance if possible, so you can avoid the line when you arrive and have to wait to purchase tickets.

      2. At many venues, you can avoid the online ticket fees by swinging by the ticket office/venue itself in person, if you’re ever in that area.

      3. If you’re buying tickets when you arrive, remember to plan extra time to stand in line to purchase tickets.

Screen Shot 2018-08-28 at 7.51.00 PM.png
DCMR Data Buy Tickets

Do you have any other takeaways on this?  What do you think?


NEW RELEASES

Music

  • Clutch - In Walks Barbarella
     (Hard Rock Single - with horns and a funky vibe - RIYL Led Zeppelin, Faith No More, Motorhead, Black Sabbath)

  • Marielle Kraft - Test Drive
     (Pop Single - RIYL Shawn Mendes, Colbie Caillat, Taylor Swift, Ben Rector)

  • Leo & Cygnus - Machina
     (Indie Single - RIYL Fleetwood Mac)

Videos

Playlists


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Here’s just a few highlights for the coming week, be sure to check out the calendar for the full list of all the upcoming shows!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Aug 31 - Fri
The Radiographers @ Gypsy Sally's in Washington, DC (rock)
Swampcandy @ The Loft at The Hamilton in Washington, DC (folk)
Sub-Radio @ JamBrew in Herndon, VA (Pop/rock)

Sep 3 - Mon (Labor Day)
29th Annual DC Free Blues Festival - 2pm-7pm
Wunder Garten - NOMA Metro - new Location!
Memphis Gold with Harmonica Legend Charlie Sayles, Patty Reese, Fast Eddie & The Slowpokes, Rogue Johnsen Trio

Sep 4 - Tue
Bottled up @ DC9 Nightclub in Washington, DC

Sep 6 - Thu
Near Northeast @ DC9 Nightclub in Washington, DC
The Meer & Tired All The Time @ Villain & Saint in Bethesda, MD


Patreon

Do you like what we're doing?  Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **M4TR**


We're Looking For Advertisers/Sponsors

We're looking for local businesses to spread the word about with our more than 12,000 followers.  Know One?  Would you introduce us to them?

4/24/18 - Special Guest: Hayley Fahey

Thanks to Hayley Fahey for hanging out with us in the studio this week!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. Fellowcraft - Stonehearted (Hard Rock, Grunge)

  2. Mine, by Hayley Fahey (Indie Rock, Alternative)

  3. Angeline, by The Sidleys (Blues, Funk)

  4. ***Emily, by Ara Casey (Indie, Folk)

  5. Welcome To My Day, by Eric Scott (Pop, Folk Acoustic)

***The first time we've played this artist for you on the show, & a new artist profile added to our DC Artist Database!  There's new artists every week!

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


ANNOUNCEMENTS

STREAM BRIAN’S NEW SONG TWICE?!
Brian’s band, Fellowcraft, released their new single, Stonehearted, on all platforms.  Brian’s humble request...would you stream it twice? All the links to access it everywhere are at the link below.  It’s been 2 years in the making, the upcoming full album, “Three”, is due out later this summer.

http://www.fellowcraftband.com/stonehearted


NEW MUSIC RELEASES

  • Sub-Radio - Headfirst (5 Song Indie EP, RIYL Walk The Moon)

  • Flasher - Pressure (Rock Single, RIYL a-ha)

  • Nitemoves - Don’t Ask! (11 Song Album, RIYL EDM/Techno)

  • Names - Pink House (9 Song Rock Album, RIYL Radiohead)

  • Thievery Corporation - Treasures From The Temple (12 Song World Album, RIYL Boozoo Bajou)

  • Fellowcraft - Stonehearted (Hard Rock Single, RIYL Soundgarden)

Our 2018 New Releases by DC Artists’ Spotify Playlist:
https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/7kbMQzbrQPisoJq5A76V3k


NEW VIDEOS

Our ‘DC Artists Official Music Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70kU0_uB-sdviWajkbzi2Akr


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Here’s just a few highlights for the coming week, be sure to check out the calendar for the full list of all the upcoming shows!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Fri Apr 27
--Sub-Radio (EP Release) & Throwing Plates @ Jammin Java (Indie Rock, RIYL Norah Jones, Walk The Moon)
--Queue @ Slash Run (Indie, RIYL The Cranberries)

Sat Apr 28
--Hayley Fahey (Album Release) @ Villian & Saint (Rock, RIYL Eva Cassidy, Zac Brown Band)
--G.U.M.P. @ Black Cat (Hip Hop, RIYL N.E.R.D.)
--Time Is Fire @ Rock and Roll Hotel (Rock, RIYL Public Image Ltd)

Wed May 2
--Jonny Grave @ Pearl Street Warehouse (Blues, RIYL Junior Kimbrough)

Thurs May 3
--Beanstalk Library @ Kennedy Center Millenium Stage (Rock, RIYL The Replacements
--Two Ton Twig @ State Theatre (Bluegrass, RIYL The Hackenshaw Boys)
--Den-Mate @ Black Cat (Electronic Indie, RIYL Portishead)


Patreon

Do you like what we're doing?  Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **Music 4 The Revolution (Abu Jibran)**


We're Looking For Sponsors

We're looking for local businesses to sponsor us!  Know One?  Would you introduce us to them?



Hayley Fahey

Video - Bio - Links - Transcript

Hayley's Bio:

Hayley Fahey Sings

Hayley Fahey is a singer-songwriter who captivates audiences with her sparkling range and originality. What sets her apart, in addition to her writing and voice, are her live stage performances and the presence she has, exuding energy, confidence and love for the music. When Hayley is on stage, she’s home.

Fahey draws from the many influences of her Washington, D.C. area home. The soulful sound of R&B translates into her passionate vocal performances. Her writing and sound are versatile and inspiring, from her indie-folk vibe to catchy pop hooks that get stuck in your head. She performs both solo and with her band of seasoned professionals on impressive stages like the 9:30 Club, State Theatre, Bethesda Blues and Jazz Club, Rams Head Live, and many more. She has recorded two full length albums, the second of which to be released April 28th, 2018. 

Web: http://hayleyfahey.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HayleyFaheyMusic /
Instagram: @HayleyNotes / https://www.instagram.com/HayleyNotes 
Twitter: @HeyHayleyMusic / https://twitter.com/HeyHayleyMusic 
SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/hayley-fahey 

Hayley Fahey
Hayley Fahey guitar

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:    On DC Music Rocks we're shining a spotlight on the great songs, artists, and incredible people behind the DC regions local music scene. Hayley Fahey is singer song writer from Washington DC and you said Rockville specifically, right?

Hayley Fahey:    Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Brian:    And what sets her apart, in addition to her writing and voice, are her live stage performances and the presence she has. Exuding energy, confidence, and love for the music. When Hayley is on stage she's home. I've actually seen this in action several times including when she performed at last years DC Music Rocks festival at the nine thirty club, which was incredible and she was right at home, its really true, when she was up there. Her writing and sound are versatile and inspiring. From her indie folk vibe, to the catchy, pop hooks like “mine” that you just heard, that get stuck in your head. Which happened to me this week, definitely stuck in my head. She performs both solo and with her band and she's recorded two full length albums and this is the second one that's coming out Saturday, April 28th called “Out There”

 Hayley, thanks for being here.

Hayley Fahey:    Thanks for having me.

Brian:    Such a treat to have you here and get to share cause I, selfishly I know all about you because I've been a fan for a while and you performed at the festival but for those folks listening who don't know you, it's a treat to actually get to share you with them now, because this is such a treat. So, describe yourself. What would you say is, well what's special about this album coming out? What is it for you?

Hayley Fahey:    Its different because its, it shows a different side of my music. Shows me with the full band and the songs have a lot of variation in them and emotion. There's some songs like “Mine” that are super fun, super upbeat and really happy, and then there's other songs on the album like "Dry Ice" or "Your Name” or “From Dusk till Dawn” that are a little bit darker and it kinda shows a different side of the music.

Brian:    There it is. Where do you, where does it come from, these things? Are these personal experiences, do you read it in books and get inspired? Where do the songs come from on this album?

Hayley Fahey:    On this album I'd say a lot of it is personal experience and also just experiences of even people around me that are close to me that I've seen having life experiences and I write things about them.

Brian:    Wow. Its kind of cool to hear that to because that's, I feel like that where a lot of artists get their inspiration and at the same time its really fun to then hear that transformed into the songs like you've done this album. Its such a treat.

 Now talk about your earliest memory with music. What comes to mind?

Hayley Fahey:    Earliest memory with music. I remember I would sing and have little performances for my family at family gatherings. Whenever there was a chance I would be up there singing my heart away.

Brian:    And how old were you? How old are we talking when you say that?

Hayley Fahey:    I remember being four years old, gathering my cousins to listen.

Brian:    What were you singing? Was it certain songs that you knew the words to, or what was it?

Hayley Fahey:    Yeah, my dad was a big music lover. Both of my parents were big music lovers, but he taught me one of the songs that was one of my favorites he would sing to me was “My Girl.” I loved to sing that.

Brian:    Oh my god, that's so cliché and so good at the same time. Shout out to your dad, I love it.

Hayley Fahey:    Hey dad!

Brian:    I love it. I love it. And so, now what about your first memory performing? Is it that same thing, at family gatherings? Or what's actually performing for someone other than your family, what's the first memory that comes to mind?

Hayley Fahey:    I remember singing in church choir. I was always in choir growing up.

Brian:    Now this is also, its been Rockville the whole time?

Hayley Fahey:    Yeah. Rockville, Derwood, pretty much my whole life. I went to University of Maryland so I lived in College Park for a while.

Brian:    Oh wow, so it really has been Maryland pretty much the whole time.

Hayley Fahey:    Yeah its been Maryland. Maryland girl.

Brian:    Oh I love it. God, that's amazing. So outside of music then, what are your hobbies? Or on the personal side how do you also spend your time, besides music?

Hayley Fahey:    I love spending time with my friends.

Brian:    Which by the way if you follow her on Instagram, she generally has at least a couple of adorable photos with friends at some point, absolutely.

Hayley Fahey:    Generally yes, I do post them. We like to go for walks, go out to see other live DC music. I like to go to the gym, like to spend time with my boyfriend, shout out Daniel.

Brian:    Yup, alright got it. Friends and gym.

Hayley Fahey:    All that kind of good stuff.

Brian:    And as far as the arts go is music kind of your main thing? Sometimes other artists also like paint or write poetry, or some other things. Is music your main, or are there other arts for you?

Hayley Fahey:    That's a good question. Music is my main art, but I do have another side passion, artistic passion, and that's video.

Brian:    Really?

Hayley Fahey:    Yes.

Brian:    Talk about that a little bit.

Hayley Fahey:    I shoot my own music videos, and edit my music videos usually. Or sometimes I get other people to shoot them cause its hard to take videos of myself.

Brian:    Obviously, selfie videos are just not quite as flattering somehow.

Hayley Fahey:    Yeah, I'll have my friends hold the camera or hire pretty good, a local videographer too. I also do videos for other artists, I have a company called DC music and video and I do video for different artists.

Brian:    That's cool. Now, music’s full time, and how long ago did that come along, with the video editing? Cause music’s been the whole time, so how long has the music video thing been happening?

Hayley Fahey:    I've been editing videos since middle school. I went to a middle school for media production at the same time that I was really finding out that I loved music so, so much, this is kind of what I wanted to do. I was also finding out wow I love video too, so kind of at the same time.

Brian:    Wow, okay. So its been video too. That said then you certainly should check out Hayley’s YouTube channel and checkout some of her music videos because they are, I remember sharing the news about, I think it was called “Fire”, did you have a single called “Fire?”

Hayley Fahey:    I did have a single called “Fire”, yes.

Brian:    There's a music video that came out with that one that was a lot of fun, sort of out in the woods, playing around with the wood friends.

Hayley Fahey:    And fire

Brian:    And fire, of course, lots of fire. Oh I love it. So what about, talk about your funniest moment that comes to mind on stage, performing?

Hayley Fahey:    Oh my gosh. Well there have been a lot of great moments with the band, I have to say.

Brian:    Oh do share. When you say a lot of great moments, that's like such a tease. Don't tease us now, come on.

Hayley Fahey:    Oh man. The one that I can think of was one time, there's always talk about you know, band drama, there's band relationships, this and that, but Isaac and I, Isaac is my bass player, have gotten teased so much. He's my good friend, I just remember one time we were playing a gig out in Fredrick at The Blue Side and this woman was like shouting from off the stage, like "Why don't you just make a move already" and all this stuff. We couldn't even get through the song, everyone on stage, we were all laughing so much.

Brian:    Oh my god. And there is nothing between you and the bass player then?

Hayley Fahey:    No, no I have another relationship, you know, he has other relationship and this and that but it was just..

Brian:    Wow. Actually while were talking about that, how did the band come together then? Has it always been this group, or how long has it been the group that it is now that recorded this?

Hayley Fahey:    This group was my first band.

Brian:    Awesome. So like ever since you started in I guess, high school, or college too?

Hayley Fahey:    Yeah. I started, I gathered the band two years ago at the end of college was when I started playing with the full band.

Brian:    Wow, and its been two years, still together?

Hayley Fahey:    Still together. And we came together, we actually all are from Derwood, or live in Derwood.

Brian:    No way! Now if they don't know where Derwood is, where is Derwood? And the proper pronunciation, is Derwood?

Hayley Fahey:    It is Derwood, it's a little town that people generally say is Rockville, but its actually Derwood.

Brian:    Got it, okay.

Hayley Fahey:    And its kind of near Gaithersburg, or Rockville in Maryland, but it is its own place.

Brian:    its own place that's in between Rockville

Hayley Fahey:    In between the better known cities, its agriculturally zoned, it is its own little place.

Brian:    Oh so like farming?

Hayley Fahey:    I guess so, and its known for the Out of the Way Café.

Brian:    Right. Oh I've seen you play shows there sometimes. Yeah, absolutely. Did I read somewhere, you might have shared that at some point that that was one of your first gigs, was at the Out of the Way Café?

Hayley Fahey:    It was, it absolutely was, yeah.

Brian:    Do you remember what you performed at that first gig?

Hayley Fahey:    Yes, I do. I remember my uncle Pat was here, he's actually gonna be a special guest at the c.d. release party. You heard it here first.

Brian:    Uncle Pat, shout out. There he is, alright.

Hayley Fahey:    He's a mandolin player and he's coming in from California to be a little surprise guest, but I remember playing "Georgia"

Brian:    Oh my goodness, going to the classics, love it. Alright now, what's one thing in your music collection that might surprise us?

Hayley Fahey:    I have several Stevie Wonder albums.

Brian:    Really?

Hayley Fahey:    Yes, I also loved the Dixie Chicks growing up. Listened to a lot of Dixie Chicks, and a lot of Otis Redding.

Brian:    Really?

Hayley Fahey:    I remember singing a lot of Otis Redding and a lot of Stevie Wonder. At musical theater camp everyone would do a talent and they would usually all sing Broadway songs and I would go up there and sing an Otis Redding or a Stevie Wonder song,

Brian:    Oh my god, that's amazing. What song are you thinking of when you say that? Was there one that was like, if I'm gonna do it, this is my default?

Hayley Fahey:    I definitely remember “try a little tenderness”

Brian:    Alright, so if you're listening and you don't know what that is, go on YouTube or whatever your music setting is and check out "try a little tenderness" and see what she's talking about. That's funny, and if there's video somewhere and I ever find it I promise to share it with you. But there isn't that I'm aware of so we won't call her out on that just yet. Now tell a story about one time you tried and failed.

Hayley Fahey:    Okay, I will.

Brian:    Okay, tell us. I'm sitting, I'm ready. Sock it to me.

Hayley Fahey:    There's been many times that I auditioned for things, didn't get in kind of thing. Tried and failed. I assume you're talking about music, tried and failed thing.

Brian:    In general, I mean obviously that would be the one that seems relevant to you, so yeah talk about that.

Hayley Fahey:    This is true. So several times I have auditioned for American Idol, or the Voice a couple of times and I just remember one time specially I went in, I got a call back, like one of those executive producer call backs. They found me somewhere and they said “can you come in for a private audition?” And I came in for the audition and I sang twenty seconds of my song and they were like "thank you sweetie, but it's a no from us.” And then I left, and I drove back home. I was out in, I think I was in Philadelphia for that.

Brian:    Wow, and what were you saying to yourself when you were on the way home after that?

Hayley Fahey:    I was so upset. I was like “there's nothing more for me in music.”

Brian:    Oh it was one of those questioning your whole life stories

Hayley Fahey:    Nineteen year old me

Brian:    "What am I doing? Why am I doing this?” Oh god, and then what happened? You picked yourself up or you, what happened after that? Cause you're still here, and you're still singing.

Hayley Fahey:    I'm trying, I'm still going

Brian:    Well there's a lot of people that think that you're doing a lot more than trying, they think you're succeeding.

Hayley Fahey:    Well thank you

Brian:    For sure, and if that song that just played is any indication, I think you're succeeding too. So I'm glad that the American Idol judges didn't knock you off your track here. So now my favorite question to ask is if you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be?

Hayley Fahey:    Biggest piece of advice is, follow your heart. I know that's so cliché, but..

Brian:    Yeah, say more about what that means.

Hayley Fahey:    I'm a music teacher, and I teach all sorts of kids

Brian:    What kind of music teacher, when you say that?

Hayley Fahey:    I teach piano, guitar, voice lessons

Brian:    So like, private lessons and stuff?

Hayley Fahey:    Private lessons generally, private lessons and I'll go to peoples houses. I've taught at studios before and one of the biggest things I try to teach my students is confidence in yourself, and I think that's something we all work on and that were all constantly learning and were all constantly evolving. But just confidence in yourself and following your dreams to the best of your ability. That's what I would say.

Brian:    Absolutely, great advice. Especially with music and with your passions outside of work. I feel like a lot of people listening might have those nine to five, Monday to Friday jobs, I mean gosh knows I do too, but at the same time you kind of gotta follow your heart and do the things that make you feel alive. I love that advice. Now and one last thing for those people who wanna find out more, follow you, find out what you're doing, where do they go?

Hayley Fahey:    They can go to hayleyfahey.com. Hayley with two y's. H-a-y-l-e-y.

Brian:    Yes, the spelling. Let's reiterate that. Its H-a-y-l-e-y. And Fahey is..

Hayley Fahey:    F as in frank, a-h-e-y.com

Brian:    So there's a lot of a's and y's, but its hayleyfahey. And its F-a-h-e-y. HayleyFahey.com.

 And is there a social media you tend to gravitate toward more than the others? Or you use them all, I'm assuming?

Hayley Fahey:    I use them all. I love Instagram, @hayleynotes

Brian:    Got it.

3/13/18 - Special Guest: The Fringe Benefits

Thanks to Bruce and Dave with The Fringe Benefits for hanging out with us in the studio this week!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. Until They Find Us, by The Grey A (Indie, Rock)

  2. Step Out, by The Fringe Benefits (Pop, Motown)

  3. Hurricane, by Hayley Fahey (Rock, Indie Rock)

  4. Diamonds Are Optional, by Vintage#18 (Blues, Soul)

  5. Someone Special, by Stephen Ascone (Pop)

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


ANNOUNCEMENTS

Brian was interviewed! Somehow word got around about DC Music Rocks, and I was contacted via Linkedin to do a "12 Minute Convo" (Podcast). Sometimes you just have to say yes and try things in life, and this was so random, I was skeptical, and turned out fun! Also fun to be the one answering the questions for a change!
https://twelveminuteconvos.com/brian-nelson-palmer/

 

We need your help supporting WERA 96.7FM, the station where the live version of our show airs!  Arlington County is planning to cut funding for the station by 20%, which would gut the station staff, drive up costs to the station’s community considerably, and potentially even cause the loss of the station itself.
https://www.arlingtonmedia.org/about/proposed-fy-19-county-budget-catastrophic-aim

The county board will vote on the proposed budget on April 21st. Here’s how we need your help before the vote:

  1. If you live in Arlington, or know someone who does, forward them this link and sign our petition - Urging the County Board to restore AIM's funding. https://www.change.org/p/arlington-county-board-urge-the-arlington-county-board-to-act-to-restore-arlington-independent-media-s-funding

  2. Share Your Feedback on Arlington's FY 2019 Proposed Budget - This county survey asks Arlington residents to give feedback on the proposed budget. Must be completed by April 9, 2018
    https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/FY19BudgetFeedback

  3. Write your County Board members - countyboard@arlingtonva.us - Tell them you want AIM's funding restored!! Sample letter here - https://www.arlingtonmedia.org/about/proposed-fy-19-county-budget-catastrophic-aim/sample-letter-county-board-stop-aim-budget-cuts

Speak with a County Board member at an Open Door Monday. Open to all Arlington residents.  No appointment is necessary to talk one-on-one with a County Board member on any topic. Mondays, 7 - 9PM, at locations around the Arlington. See schedule below:

  • Open Door Monday at Arlington Mill Community Center- Monday, March 12th

  • Open Door Monday at Central Library - Monday, March 19th

  • Open Door Monday at Aurora Hills Library - Monday March 26th

  • Open Door Monday at Langston Brown Community Center - Monday, April 2nd https://countyboard.arlingtonva.us/open-door-mondays/


NEW MUSIC RELEASES

Our 2018 New Releases by DC Artists’ Spotify Playlist:
https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/7kbMQzbrQPisoJq5A76V3k


NEW VIDEOS

Our ‘DC Artists Official Music Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70kU0_uB-sdviWajkbzi2Akr


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Check the calendar, linked below, for the full list!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Fri Mar 16
Karen Jonas & Skribe @ Lost Rhino in Ashburn, VA
Vim & Vigor @ The Ugly Mug on 8th St SE in DC
Sub-Radio @ Whitlow’s in Arlington

Sat Mar 17
Tabi Bonney @ Anacostia Arts Center
Justin Trawick and Pebble 2 Pearl @ Shamrock & Roll Festival in Loudon
--https://www.eventbrite.com/e/shamrock-roll-st-patricks-day-block-party-tickets-42575122337

Tues Mar 20
Mystery Friends @ Union Stage in DC

Wed Mar 21
Lavender @ Milkboy Arthouse in College Park MD


Patreon

Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **Music 4 The Revolution (Abu Jibran)**



The Fringe Benefits

Video - Bio - Links - Transcript

The Fringe Benefit's Bio:

The Fringe Benefits.jpg

The Fringe Benefits began forming at the end of 2013 with talented and experienced musicians from northern Virginia. The 5 piece band based in Gainesville Virginia features drums, guitar, bass, guitar synth and 5 vocalists. Julianna Smith, lead vocalist has a big, powerful and soulful voice that makes the band’s recordings instantly recognizable.

The band performs regularly in Northern Virginia. Playing songs that draw ladies to the dance floor, the band creatively “mashes-up” covers of songs from 80’s to today. The band also plays a original songs including "You're On My Time Now" that went to #1 on the Radio Indie Alliance chart in 2017 and just released Oct 2017, “Step Out” which won an honorable mention in the pop category at the recent Songwriters Association of Washington. On March 3rd at our 4 year anniversary show, we introduced a new original “Mama Knows Blessed”.

Links:

http://www.thefringebenefitsband.com
http://facebook.com/FringeBenefitsBand/
Twitter- @fringebenefitsb

3yrCakePose Fringe Benefits
fringeCasino.jpg
SPBruce1.jpg

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:     On DC Music Rocks, we're shining a spotlight on the great songs, artists and incredible people behind the DC region's local music scene. The Fringe Benefit's is a 5 piece band based in Gainesville, Virginia featuring drums, guitar, bass, guitar synth and vocalists. Five vocalists. I mean, everybody sings. We've got Juliana Smith, who's lead vocalist, has big, powerful and soulful voice that makes the bands recordings instantly recognizable. They were born in 2013. The band performs regularly around northern Virginia and they play originally music and creatively mash up covers of songs of the 80's to today. So, I first came across them when I was doing the show a while back and I've been A Friend's Benefit's fan. The album Step Out came out and I've just been following them and I love the stuff that you're doing. So, basically, for me, being the fan boy, it's an honor to have you here man. Bruce, thanks and Dave, thanks for coming down guys. Thanks for being here.

Bruce:     It's an honor to be here Brian and I've gotta tell you, you know, the things that you're doing for the local music scene. As I mentioned earlier, it's kind of like you're the Paul Shaffer of golden Virginia music. You know everybody now.

Brian:     Wait, they don't know who Paul Shaffer is, who's Paul Shaffer?

Bruce:     He's the guy that knows everybody in the music business and actually performed with everybody from James Brown to Aretha Franklin to on and on.

Brian:     God. Okay. I take that as a compliment then. Holy smokes. I like to say I know of them. I don't know all of them yet but I'm trying. Thanks Bruce. I appreciate that man. So, now, what is it that makes the Fringe Benefit's special? That's what I want to know off the bat.

Bruce:     I don't think this was on the list.

Brian:     There's a lot of bands out there. So, what is it that makes the Fringe Benefit's show or the Fringe Benefit's a little different from the others?

Bruce:     Yeah. So, I would say it's really stage presence. The covers consist of the core of the shore. We do the original songs as self promotion and give us something unique but really I would say, truly, honest, it's stage presence. We used to have different ones that were singing lead vocal and when you're singing to the people in the audience, they're looking at you and you make eye contact. So, a year ago John said you know, I'm singing lead vocal in the song. Nobody's looking at me. Everybody's looking at Juliana and I said well dude, I'm not gonna tell her to cut her stage presence. You gotta increase your stage presence.

Brian:     You gotta step it up buddy.

Bruce:     Yeah. Step it up and we have so, it's happening but yeah, we go from song to song well. We play popular songs that people know and enjoy and we mix in a couple originals but I think it's the stage presence. We do have a little bit different instrumentation. I'm sure you have some listeners out there that are musicians. I'm playing guitar synth. So, while you see me play guitar, you hear piano, organ, saxophone, different instruments and I do all that live. There's no track. Every note is played.

Brian:     That's amazing and Dave you're here with us too. Now, talk about, what do you think is special? You're working with the band, you're doing some of the booking too. So, talk about what you do and then talk about what you think makes Fringe Benefit's a little different? What are you booking for?

Dave:     Sure. Well, I like to work with them because they're just all about having fun and the music industry can be crazy and it can be hard to get gigs and how to get motivated to go out and knock on doors, make phone calls, and send emails. Working for these guys has been a privilege because I see just how much fun they have playing and how much fun their fans have coming out and dancing and grooving to their music all night long. I think that goes a really long way to have a group of people that are good friends, that enjoy each other's company and they just have a lot of fun.

Bruce:     You really get three aspects of playing in music. You get the gigs, the music and then the relationships and we take advantage and have fun with all that but as you talk about having fun, this is a big contrast to one of your artists that you played earlier. They're all political. We have nothing political in what we're doing unless it's in a popular cover tune. Then it's not us saying it.

Brian:     True. That's one of the great things I love about the DC scenes too is that you really get everything. [crosstalk 00:04:43] People sing about what's close to their heart and if you're writing, you're writing a song about step out - which is about your friends that are coming out and one of your other songs might be about something else that happened to you. For some people, this is how they air their political frustrations and for others it's where you get your inspiration from and it changes every time.

Bruce:     Beautiful.

Brian:     So, it's a cool thing. Now, talk about where does the name come from? Fringe Benefits. What's the story there?

Bruce:     So, my version of the story is we were coming together long about the time Obama Care was coming in and it was my belief that no one could afford health insurance for their employees. So, maybe they could provide some fringe benefits. Maybe one of those could be having the Fringe Benefits band at the company party.

Brian:     So, I liked to point out how you just talked about how you weren't political and yet that's the story of your name Bruce.

Bruce:     Well, I didn't ask the question.

Brian:     Man, that's funny.

Bruce:     There's nothing wrong with having Fringe Benefits, right?

Brian:     That's darn right. I enjoy Fringe Benefits. Fringe Benefit's are nice.

Bruce:     Yeah, I get dinged for that one. Okay.

Brian:     I just had to call you out there for a second because that's really funny. All right. So, your connection to the DC scene, how long have you guys both been in the DC area and what part of the area?

Bruce:     So, I've been here and gone and come back. So, I went to high school - Jeb Stuart, [Oakton 00:06:06]. We're on Wilson Boulevard now. So, down at Seven Quarters, the Eaton Center was [Lafiat 00:06:13] Radio and I worked there. A lot of people don't realize this but the CB boom, nationwide, started in that store and I was a witness to it. So, it was pretty cool but now I've been living in Manassas for 20 years.

Brian:     Got it and what about you Dave?

Dave:     I grew up in Gray Falls and went to Langley High School. My first concert I remember was at the Patriot's Center and it was with the Deaf Tones, Incubus and Tape Root and I just remember having the time of my life and I knew from then on, music was a passion of mine.

Brian:     Yep. [inaudible 00:06:52] I love it. Bruce, you brought up memory with music, Bruce, what's your earliest memory with music?

Bruce:     So, I think it's a pretty cool story. So, one of the kids in the neighborhood got a silk shier, several tone, acoustic guitar and one of the other kids came up and said hey, yo, Ed's got a guitar! We gotta go check it out!  So, we went over to Ed's house and we were pulling the guitar out of each other's hands playing The Lick From Dirty Water. It was a hit song.

Brian:     Okay.

Bruce:     By the Stand Bells and so, that was my earliest memory. Well, about five years ago, I had a beer with the bass player from the Stand Bells.

Brian:     Really? Oh my god.

Bruce:     Pretty cool.

Brian:     That's amazing. Wow. Oh, man. That must have been wild. Oh goodness and while we're on the topic of moments in history here, talk about the funniest moment for the band. What comes to mind?

Bruce:     Two years, maybe three years ago, we dressed up for Halloween. We wanted to do dead rock stars. I did Elvis and many of you may know that Elvis died on the toilet and so, at the end of my choreographed, heart break hotel, there's a turd on the stage. Juliana said I'm not going up there.

Brian:     Oh, that's awful. Oh, man. What did you do?

Bruce:     So, we had a good laugh. Well, actually one of our friends picked it up and pretended to eat it. So, that was [crosstalk 00:08:30].

Brian:     But this was supposed to be funny.

Bruce:     You know who you are.

Brian:     Oh my god. That's unbelievable. All right. Wow. So, when we're not talking about the music stuff then. So, on the personal side, talk about your hobbies and interests. What do you guys do outside of the music? Bruce you first.

Bruce:     Okay. The music is like a therapy for me and kind of powers me for everything else I do. My day job is internet advertising but I also have a company where I do software for printing companies and then community service stuff. I served on the board of the Prince William Chamber of Commerce.

Brian:     Oh.

Bruce:     And the Center for the Arts and the Candy Factory in Manassas. I'm a member of the Manassas Rotary Club and as a band, the Fringe Benefit's have cooked for the homeless a couple times at the serve shelter in Manassas.  So, I'm gonna sign us up and do that again. So, we have a lot of fun just doing stuff for other people.

Brian:     Man, community service stuff. I like that Bruce. Dave, what about you?

Dave:     I'm actually big on the gardening.

Brian:     Really?

Dave:     Yeah.

Brian:     Fantastic.

Dave:     I'm on 5 acres and just planting fruit trees and vegetables and we got chickens. Just big into that and connecting with nature and going hiking and traveling. I just got back from Costa Rica.

Brian:     Costa Rica.

Dave:     I was there for two weeks-

Brian:     Nice.

Dave:     It's an amazing place. I highly suggest it.

Brian:     That's cool. All right. Lots of stuff going on outside and now, I guess to tag onto that then, let's say it's the weekend and you've got nothing on the schedule, you actually have open time. What would you do? If it's Saturday, Sunday and you don't have anything on the schedule, what would you do?

Bruce:     Me? I'm working.

Brian:     What does that mean? For one of the companies or for-

Bruce:     Yeah. Doing ads for clients or either I'm goofing off. Actually, last weekend what I did was working on new technology for the guitar synth. So, that's a fun thing.

Brian:     That's right. You get your guitar synth. That's your thing. What about you Dave? What would you do if you had a weekend off?

Dave:     I will literally be in my garden at like midnight pulling out weeds and planting stuff. I'll have my head lamp on and you know-

Brian:     Oh my god. Those amazing head lamps? You have to see a picture. I took a selfie with them so you can see it and I'm just envisioning him with a headlamp on at midnight. That's really funny. I love that. Gardening.

Dave:     Gardening.

Brian:     Gardening's a thing. I love it.

Dave:     Very therapeutic.

Brian:     Okay, cool. Well, and this questions to both of you guys. This is one of my favorite questions to ask in these interviews is if you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be? And I want to hear from both of you actually. So, Dave, why don't you go first?

Dave:     So, piece of advice for bands, correct?

Brian:     It's up to you. You can offer whatever piece of advice to whoever you want.

Dave:     Okay. Well, I mean the first piece of advice would be to have fun like we talked about with the Fringe Benefits. That's so important. If you're going to be in a band, you're going to be committed to being with these set of people and practicing and going to shows and be committed to this. Have fun and pick people that you're going to get along with and then practice. Really prepare yourself for the gigs, get your songs down, your set list and know what direction you want to go and have a clear vision. Have a plan.

Brian:     Yeah.

Dave:     And then execute it. Go out, get gigs, get a booking agent - someone that's going to represent you.

Brian:     What's the best way to get a booking agent? You just reach out?

Dave:     Yeah, you can give me a call.

Brian:     There you go. Go ahead and say your name is-

Dave:     My name is Dave. Dave [Maskatello 00:12:14]-

Brian:     And how do they find you?

Dave:     Planetary music is my company. You can go on Planetaryband.com. I just bought a new domain. It's going to be Planetarymusic.com, which I'm now building but Facebook's great. Anyway, Planetary Music but there's plenty of agents and you can find some great managers in the area and a manager, if you're an original band, is really important because they'll help you manage your day to day stuff and get the right recording study and get into interviews like this.

Brian:     There you go, yeah.

Dave:     A band called Foot Work that needs to get out here.

Brian:     Oh, there it is. Please do welcome Foot Work, whenever they want to come on, I would love to have them because Foot Work's a great hip hop. I love the hip hop scene in DC and man, Foot Work is one of the early ones I found and I love them so that would be cool.

Dave:     They're about to go on tour in April but anyway, back to the advice. Yeah, promote your shows.

Brian:     Yep.

Dave:     Definitely promote your shows.

Brian:     It's huge.

Dave:     Venues, yes, they're going to do their part and band's gotta do their part.

Brian:     And Bruce, what about you man? One piece of advice.

Bruce:     So, on the fun side, it's never go to a radio interview unprepared.

Brian:     Public service announcement. Thank you Bruce. I appreciate that and the man is prepared. I give him credit. He's got notes in front of him right now. This man is ready. So, I love it. I truly appreciate that man. I appreciate that. That's good. All right. One more time. For those folks who want to find and follow more about the Fringe Benefits and the things you're doing and where you're playing and all that stuff, where do they go?

Bruce:     Thefringbenefitsband.com

11/21/17 - 2017 New Releases All Music Episode

Next week we have Lisa W. and Clare Z. from Pearl Street Warehouse for coming on the show!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcherPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM TODAY'S SHOW

MUSIC

  1. Daily Prayer, by Aaron Abernathy (Hip Hop/R&B)
  2. Inside Out, by Staunton (Rock/Hard Rock)
  3. Product Of Hip Hop, by Area 301 (Hip Hop/R&B)
  4. Crash, by Billy Winn (Pop/Dance)
  5. New, by Rent Party (Rock/Alternative Rock)
  6. Armageddon, by Derek Evry (Rock/Alternative Rock)
  7. The Crown, by Bencoolen (Rock/Pop)
  8. Ponle Fin, by Elena & Los Fulanos (Latin/World)
  9. Fine (feat Eros), by Jen Miller (Indie/Pop)
  10. Train Of Thought, by Timberbrooke (Rock, Hard Rock)
  11. Fire, by Hayley Fahey (Rock/Indie Rock)
  12. Or So It Seemed, by Sara Curtin (Indie/Folk)
  13. Cow, by Caustic Casanova (Hard Rock/Psychedelic Metal)

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-

Happy Thanksgiving, from all of us at DC Music Rocks!


Patreon

Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
--Daniel Warren Hill  --David Mohl


11-21-17 All Music Social B4.jpg

8/22/17 - Special Guests: Joe & Alisha of Songbyrd Music House

Thanks Joe Lapan and Alisha Edmonson - co founders of Songbyrd Media House - for coming by the studio this week!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might take time to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcherPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

FROM TODAY'S SHOW

MUSIC

  1. Tell Me Why, by Hayley Fahey (Rock/Indie Rock)
  2. War, by G.U.M.P (Hip Hop/Alternative Rock)
  3. Hannah, by Handsome Hound (Folk/Folk Rock)
  4. Climax: Moonshine, by Names (Rock/Psychedlic Rock)
  5. Locked, by Thaylobleu (Hard Rock/Punk Rock)
  6. Son of Larry, by Aaron Abernathy (R&B/Soul)

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-

ANNOUNCEMENTS

We’re hosting a show at the 9:30 Club on Saturday 9/2!  Ever since our humble beginnings, we’ve dreamed of sharing the incredible music from the DC local region in a venue that is fitting for the incredible talent these musicians have.  Please come!  If you know someone who would be interested in this, would you share it with them too?  Or share it with them in general?  If we draw a good crowd, the 9:30 Club has said they’ll let us make this a regular thing, and we’d love to get more great local artists on that caliber of stage.  We really appreciate your help!  We love supporting this DC local music scene!

930club facebook event:
https://www.facebook.com/events/233306840525249/

930club ticket website:
http://www.930.com/event/1546598-dc-music-rocks-festival-washington/

Playlist of the great artists which will be featured at the show!
https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/6NA7boFgtB5hUpDPDdD7BQ

NEW RELEASES

Music:
FuzzQueen - Ribbons and Flowers (Single)
Lionize - Fire in Athena (Single)
Exnations - Never About The Money (Single)

Video:
Carolyn Malachi - Sky (official music video)
https://youtu.be/Luh3k75rCEM

THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE 

There's so many!  Visit our Local Music Calendar to see the full list!  These are just the few we discussed on the show to get you started.

Fri Aug 25
Vintage#18 @ Blackwall Hitch in Alexandria, VA
The Woodshedders @ Hill Country BBQ in Chinatown in NW DC

Sat Aug 26
Christos DC @ Jammin Java in Vienna, VA
The Cowards Choir @ Iota Club and Cafe in Clarendon in Arlington, VA
Handsome Hound @ Black Cat on 14th&U in NW DC

Sun Aug 27
Sol Roots @ JoJo Bar on U St in NW DC

Wed Aug 30
Ms Fridrich, Beanstalk Library, Rachel Levitin @ DC9 on U St in NW DC



Joe & Alisha, Songbyrd Music House Co-Founders

VIDEO - BIO - LINKS - TRANSCRIPT

BIOS:

Joe & Alisha.JPG
DC Music Rocks Joe Lapan Songbyrd Media House Pic

Joe Lapan is a real estate attorney and professional by background, but always had a passion for music and its power to connect and unify people and to provide the perfect entry point for exploration of culture and history.  Joe had always been the guy who made mix tapes, camped out for new album releases and hosted informal "listening parties" with his friends.  Joe also has a passion for small business in the District of Columbia. Around 2010, Joe began writing a business plan for a place that might bring these experiences into the "commercial" world as a sort of music comparable to the sports bar, or a "re-imagined" record store. Joe primarily runs business affairs, marketing and what he likes to call "alternative events" for Songbyrd. Alternative events encompass all those things that aren't live music shows, such as label partnerships, listeningparties, in-store events etc. Joe is the Washington DC point man for Classic Album Sundays, a worldwide album celebration platform, and has appeared on numerous podcasts and other media outlets to discuss music.
 

DC Music Rocks Songbyrd Media House Pic

Alisha Edmonson is a trained architect, designer and bar/restaurant operations manager and has 10+ years of relevant experience. She has an interdisciplinary background in construction, finance and architecture/design, as well as years of experience as a bartender and manager. Alisha began her career in the field of design and construction but she was raised around small business, with her family owning and running a coffee
roaster in Oregon. While attending graduate school in DC she begin bartending at L Enfant Café in Adams Morgan and quickly become one of the
managers. She eventually moved on to bigger places including H Street Country Club and Right Proper Brewery. In each of these places she both
worked on the floor and managed. In addition to working in the bar/restaurant industry she has been doing contract work as a event designer and
manager for large events in both Arizona and Oregon, most notably, What The Festival in Duffer Oregon, an event consisting of roughly 5,000 people
and numerous DJs and other acts. Ms. Edmonson is the Managing Member of the Songbyrd ownership and also the General Manager and is backed
by an investment team with substantial business and creative experience

Links

Website: : www.songbyrddc.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/SongbyrdDC

Twitter & Instagram: @songbyrddc

DC Music Rocks Songbyrd Media House promo pics
DC Music Rocks Songbyrd Media House pic

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:     On DC Music Rocks, We're shining a spotlight on the great songs and incredible people, like Joe and Alisha from Songbyrd, here in the DC regions' local music scene. Alisha is a trained architect, designer, and bar restaurant operations manager. She has an interdisciplinary background in construction, finance, and architecture design, as well as years of experience as a bartender and a manager. She is the managing member of Songbyrd on the ownership team and is also the general manager of the venue, so this is Alisha.

    I also have Joe, who is a real estate attorney by background but always has a passion for music and a power to connect and unify people. Joe's always been the guy who made mix tapes, camped out for new album releases, and hosted informal listening parties with his friends. Around 2010, he began to write a business plan for a place that might bring these kind of experiences into the commercial world. Songbyrd, which is like a sports bar for music or a re-imagined music store, is what he created. Joe primarily runs business affairs, marketing, and what he likes to call alternative or non-musical events for Songbyrd.

 I first ran into these folks at some of the conferences around town for local music, and I've been to the venue I can't even count on fingers and toes the number of times. It's such a great place. It is a treat to have you here. Thanks for being here, you guys.

Alisha:     Thanks for inviting us.

Joe:     Cheers.

Brian:     Tell us about ... We baited them earlier with it, but tell us about the name "Songbyrd." Where does that come from?

Alisha:     Well, we originally had some other names for this place, but when we found the space, it was a nightclub and it wasn't what we were looking for, but it had this really amazing music history. It was called The Showboat for years from the '50s to the '70s, and the house band was Charlie Byrd's band, and he and his manager owned and ran it. It just kind of spoke to us when we found out the history of it. Charlie Byrd and Stan Getz played there almost every night doing jazz samba that was just really special.

Brian:     That's cool. And so it became in honor of Byrd it was Songbyrd.

Alisha:     Yeah, a little homage to DC music history.

Joe:     Yeah, and for those who don't know, Charlie Byrd, not to be mistaken with Charlie Parker, who was nicknamed Bird. Charlie Byrd is the famous jazz guitarist originally from Maryland, spent his life and career in Maryland and DC, recorded Jazz Samba, one of the greatest selling and greatest jazz albums of all time, based on a fusion of American jazz and Brazilian samba. He did a lot of democracy work and State Department work with Brazil and recorded that album at the All Souls Church just up the street from us in Adams Morgan.

Brian:     So much history there. All right, so that's where Songbyrd ... I've always wondered. Man, that's awesome. Now, what about ... Now it's a lot of work to start a venue. How did you guys meet, and how did Songbyrd the venue come together?

Alisha:     Well, I moved here for grad school in 2009, and I started bartending for brunch just for some extra money and to meet people that didn't want to talk about policy, and I met Joe. That's where we met.

Brian:     Was he a customer or was he ...

Alisha:     He was a customer, yeah.

Brian:     And you started talking music?

Alisha:     Yeah, we started talking ... Well, eventually we started talking music. We started talking about the loss of listening to music, not listening to your radio or on an mp3, but really listening to an album start to finish with your friends and community.

Brian:     I don't think hardly anybody does that anymore, actually. They're not even putting albums out half the time. It's just singles. So that's true.

Joe:     Yeah, but I think more and more people are, and I see it, and we see it with some of the stuff we're doing. But yeah, that's definitely one of our focuses, to bring back that experience.

Brian:     I've seen ... Does that kind of go into the listening parties? I've seen something that you guys do listening parties, right?

Alisha:     We do several different types of listening parties, actually.

Brian:     Tell me more.

Joe:     So yeah, again, the basic idea being let's get together. You go to see a movie, but why don't you go listen to that album and enjoy it with people, maybe learn something, maybe focus on it in a different kind of way or just make a day out of it, make an experience, make an afternoon out of it. So we host a monthly event through Classic Album Sundays, which is kind of a worldwide listening party platform. In fact, going to those events in other cities kind of helped inspire me as well. But that is very focused. You're going to have presenters talking about the album. We bring in special audio file grade turntables and equipment for that event. We have that at our venue, so it's kind of more quiet and focused.

     Then we do other stuff, like you're referring to. On Fridays a lot of times we'll partner with labels based on their new music that's coming out and just throw kind of a fun something different from the regular Friday happy hour where you're going to hear the new music with your friends.

Brian:     Wow. So many cool things happening. There's always ... It's a lot of fun to follow your social media, too, because there's always all kinds of, it's like, "Oh, that's different. Oh, okay." I mean, you definitely win the award for making it interesting and exciting. The music world is so interesting and exciting now. I think you guys do a great job with that.

Joe:     Thanks, man.

Brian:     So that's nice.

Joe:     Yeah, it's a whole world, for sure.

Brian:     And what is your connections to DC? You came for grad school, Alisha.

Alisha:     Mm-hmm (affirmative)

Brian:     And Joe, have you always been here, or when did you get here?

Joe:     Yeah, it's funny, you mentioned that artist from Derwood earlier. I'm from Rockville, Maryland.

Brian:     There you go.

Joe:     So I grew up in the area, kind of always been in the area.

Brian:     Are you actually like a "local" because you've been here your whole life?

Joe:     For sure, definitely.

Brian:     Wow.

Joe:     Red line, inside the Beltway, all that.

Brian:     There it is. That breed is almost ... Although I feel like it's getting more common now, but I feel like it used to be really rare to meet somebody who is actually from the area. I don't know, maybe that's just me.

Joe:     I mean, we're probably still the minority, but it's funny because I see a lot of people from DC and around DC doing really cool things in DC, I think because we already kind of knew the place. So we had a little bit of a leg-up on newcomers who still have to kind of map it out.

Brian:     What about you guys on the personal side, outside of Songbyrd. What are your ... Do you have hobbies? What else is there to life for you guys?

Alisha:     I mean, I wish I said I had a lot hobbies.

Brian:     I know that's a lot to ask, because you probably put a lot into Songbyrd.

Alisha:     I mean, we're just going on our two-year anniversary for the venue. Before the venue, I painted. I love building furniture and just kind of a designer. Anything that has to do with art.

Brian:     Wow, so a lot of work with your hands.

Alisha:     A lot of, yeah, I love ...

Brian:     And now you've totally switched gears. Do you do anymore of that sometimes?

Alisha:     Well, we're always redesigning the space just a little bit for other things.

Brian:     So you have a living canvas now in Songbyrd. I see.

Alisha:     I have a living canvas in Songbyrd. And then I guess we've got a puppy, so that's like kind of living and breathing for this little puppy called Fife dog.

Brian:     And what kind of puppy is he?

Alisha:     She is a ...

Brian:     She.

Alisha:     Fife's a girl. She is a border collie/miniature schnauzer. She's a rescue puppy.

Brian:     Got it. What fun. And what about you, Joe?

Joe:     I do have a whole lot of things that I do. I mean, we share our puppy, so Fife keeps us busy for sure. But yeah, man, I'm into music, of course. Go to shows, spend a lot of time keeping up with new music. But I'm into all types of things. I play a lot of different sports. Still play hardball. Still play baseball, hardball, at age 39. It's a local league.

Brian:     I'm impressed.

Joe:     So I come home with some bruises every once in a while. But yeah, man, just I'm a believer in trying to stay young in the mind, you know?

Brian:     Got it. And now one of my favorite questions that I always love to ask is if you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be?

Joe:     Gosh, for the music scene specifically?

Brian:     I'll leave that up to you, actually. However you want to answer.

Joe:     Well, I'll start that off by saying be careful with giving advice, first of all.

Brian:     All right, you got that out of the way. Now give some. Go ahead.

Joe:     You know, just follow your passion. Follow your dreams. In DC music, if you're an artist, you're already doing that. But keep doing it and just write, stick to it, but failure to plan is planning to fail, so use that dream as your fuel to get into the details as well, so there's some advice.

Brian:     Excellent.

Alisha:     And my advice would be similar, but make choices and own them.

Brian:     Own them. All right. Follow them through. You did it. You made the choice. Now follow it through. Do it. I really like that too. That's a really good one. For those folks who want to know, want to follow what you're doing and find out more about Songbyrd, tell me again, where's the best place to go?

Joe:     The best place to go is, I would say, our website, www.songbyrddc.com, Byrd with a Y, because remember Charlie Byrd spelled it with a Y.

Brian:     Yes, we know that now. Yes.

Joe:     That's right. And yeah, @songbyrddc on socials. So yeah, like you said, we're out there on socials. We try to keep engaged and keep talking about ourselves and keeping people informed.

Alisha:     Our website's really comprehensive. All of our records are on there. If you want to know what we have in stock, you can click on a little link and it'll show you everything up to 24 hours in advance, and our menus, our listings, any kind of special event that we have going on, not just local music and stuff, but ...

Brian:     Thorough. Really thorough.

6/6/17 - Special Guest: Katie Hargrove

Thanks Katie Hargrove for joining us on this week's epic episode!  Lots of laughs and a great time!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might take time to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcherPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

FROM TODAY'S SHOW

MUSIC

  1. Flood by Annie Stokes (Indie/Folk)
  2. Save Me by Katie Hargrove (Pop/R&B)
  3. Good Kind of Crazy by Haley Fahey (Rock/Indie Rock)
  4. New Regent by Hyetension (Hard Rock/Rock)
  5. Devastation by Elizabeth II (Hard Rock)
  6. Hearts Intact by Ms. Fridrich (Rock/Indie Pop)

ANNOUNCEMENTS

Brian used the "Upbeat Play It Loud" playlist from DCMusicRocks.com to clean and pack his house while moving last week.  Definitely recommended next time you’ve got around the house work to do!

Donations are requested for the Fort Reno Summer Concert Series.  http://www.fortreno.com/

2017 New Releases Playlist added to the website, so you can more easily find the new ones we're referring to each week!

NEW RELEASES

Jackie & the Treehorns - Writer (single)
Annie Stokes - Flood (single)
Sub-Radio - Up (single)

THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

These are just a few we mentioned on the show, there's some every night, visit our Local Music Calendar to browse them all! 

Fri-Sun, June 9-11
VA Southpaws, Sub-Radio, Wylder, Jason Masi & MORE @ Celebrate Fairfax Festival in Fairfax, VA

Fri June 9
Vintage#18 @ Hamilton Loft in DC

Sat June 10
Hayley Fahey Band @ Piney Orchard Street Festival in Odenton, MD
Aaron Myers @ Sixth & I Synagogue in DC

Sun June 11
Heather Mae, Billy Winn @ Capital Pride Festival in DC
Teddy Chipouras @ Jammin Java in Fairfax, VA

Tues June 13
Turtle Recall @ The BullPen in DC

Thurs June 15
Color Palette @ U Street Music Hall in DC
Ken Wenzel @ Blackwall Hitch in Alexandria, VA

->UPDATED LINK! Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-



KATIE HARGROVE

VIDEO - BIO - LINKS - TRANSCRIPT

BIO:

This young, blue-eyed-soul singer is a sultrier kind of pop star. Katie Hargrove’s new self-titled debut EP, released on Transoceanic Records, is “everything I have--rolled into a few bars: it’s real, it’s painful, it’s empowering and it’s true.” Music was always an important part of Katie’s youth. The native of Knoxville, TN, began performing at age 10. She was classically trained and competed nationally in piano, but began to favor the guitar once she hit her teens. Her early influences were Carole King, Jimi Hendrix, Johnny Cash, Dixie Chicks, and Tupac. She continued to sing and write songs through high school and college, especially when things got rocky in her life. “Music is my outlet…during the ups and downs…I knew no matter how silenced I felt, my music would always give me a voice.” After graduating from the University of Florida, she moved to Washington, DC, where she now calls home. After briefly touring and playing at national charitable and community events, she was chosen by the US Dept of the Interior to perform in the Christmas Music Program at the White House this past December.

She has performed alongside Aaron Carter, “American Idol’ Kris Allen, Jason Lancaster, and Death of Paris. But when 21-year old Katie Hargrove stepped into the studio for the first time in Philadelphia, at Morningstar Studios, she almost cried she was so nervous. “I think singer-songwriters wait their whole lives hoping and dreaming of a day when their music will be more that a project,” Katie says. Together with multi-Grammy award winning producer Glenn Barratt (Elton John, Diana Ross, Shirley Caesar, Melody Gardot), producer and industry veteran Jock Wanamaker, and Morningstar engineer Dave Schonauer, Katie sought to “create something bigger than just ‘a song’ or ‘an album’ ” and to let the work resonate on its own merit.  From the hundreds Katie had written, the final songs chosen for the EP were the ones that “kept her up at night”, whose deep, forthright lyrics spoke to the subjects of love, seduction and bargaining with loss. Arranger John Conahan (The Crossing, National Cathedral Choir, Carnegie Hall, Lincoln Center) and the producers employed a team of luminary musicians to play on the record: strings from the Philly Pops; Grammy-winning trumpet player for Michael Jackson, Matt Cappy; guitarist for R&B legends (the Sound of Philadelphia, Harold Melvin and the Blue Notes, Gladys Knight, Regina Bell) Ron Jennings, and touring guitarist for Elvis Costello and Amos Lee, Ross Bellenoit. The collaboration generated just the right balance of soul and punch, vulnerability and swagger. And now, with this debut album, Katie delights in her greatest passion: sharing her music with the world. Her music embodies the new generation of strong outspoken female pop singers, and has earned her comparisons to both Adele and to Alanis Morissette.



Links

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:     On DC Music Rocks, we're shining a spotlight on the great songs and incredible people behind the DC region's music scene. Let's get to know our star here, Katie. This young, blue eyed, soul singer is a sultry our kind of pop star. She describes her latest EP as, "Everything I have rolled into a few bars." It's real, it's painful, it's empowering, and it's true. Music was always an important part of Katie's youth. Growing up in Knoxville, TN, she began performing at age 10. She was classically trained and competed nationally in piano. Really, piano?

Katie:     I did.

Brian:     I'm impressed. She's a piano player, but began to favor the guitar once she hit her teens. Her early influences were Carol King, Jimmy Hendrix, Johnny Cash, Dixie Chicks, and Tupac, which is an amazing collection of influences there. She continued to sing and write songs through high school and college, and after graduating from the University of Florida, which by the way I went to Florida State.

Katie:     Rivals.

Brian:     We'll talk about that off the air later. She moved to Washington DC where she now calls home, and her music embodies the new generation of strong, outspoken female pop singers, and there is an amazing generation of those. I first came across her music when I was listening to that track, Be My Baby on the Metro, and it connected with me. Now, listeners, it is such a treat to now have her here in the studio to share her with you. It's with great pleasure that I formally introduce Katie Hargrove.

Katie:     Hi.

Brian:     It is such a treat to have you here. Tell folks, the evolution of music in your life now. I brought up piano, I brought up guitar, go back for us, kind of run us through the progression of how you go to being the recording artist you are today.

Katie:     Wow, I mean, how much time do we have?

Brian:     The shorter version is good.

Katie:     Yeah, my dad played guitar, and he was a singer-songwriter growing up. I think I always heard music. I started picking it up and it was never a quiet day at our house, because someone was always playing music. Whether it was my dad and I playing music together, or us going to a show, or listening to a new album, we always picked albums and we would listen to them at dinner. If it was your night, you would play music. I think a little by little it just started to become my life. Around 10, 12, is when I switched to guitar and I started writing my own music. It just blossomed into a thing that I kept up with. Then I started performing in little talent shows, and things at school, and doing drama, and things like that. I think little by little I was like, "I like this. This is good," so I just kind of stuck with it.

Brian:     Wow, and now you moved up to DC, and you recorded this album now. The name of the album is ...

Katie:     It's self-titled, Katie Hargrove.

Brian:     Self-titled, Katie Hargrove. At what point did you decide, okay, I'm going to record this album? How did that happen?

Katie:     That's kind of a long story. Short Cliff Notes version.

Brian:     I've been asking the long story questions, I love it, it's like hitting home runs. Okay, talk to us.

Katie:     I performed for a family friend of mine, who I was introduced to on a back porch. I played Lost Our War, and Save Me, and she cried. She loved the songs, she loved them acoustic, and she has a friend, and he has a studio, and she introduced me to him, and she told me off the bat, "He a tough cookie, and if he doesn't like your music he's not going to be afraid to say that." I was terrified, and I met with him, and of course I was sick, and my voice sounded terrible, and I played, I think I played Lost Our War and The Last, which are both on the album. I remember him just shaking his head, and Jock, he's one of the producers on the album, he was like, "Yeah, okay. Well, send me all of your music and we'll start talking about this." I was like, "Nothing is ever going to happen. He hated it." At the time I was working at ...

Brian:     This is how he lets you down easy.

Katie:     Yeah I was like ...

Brian:     He's just like, "Oh yeah, yeah it's good. Yeah, we can go out on it."

Katie:     I was working at Vans, the shoe store, at the time. I was like, "I have to get to my shift, I don't know what I'm doing here." Little by little we started cultivating through email, and he was like, "I have this studio up in Philly, and you should come up," and blah, blah, blah. It just became a thing. Then it was like, "Okay, I should probably accept this is happening, that we're going to go to a studio and record this." The best part is I had never been in a studio, ever, I had never toured a studio.

Brian:     Wow.

Katie:     I had never done any of that. To walk in and be surrounded by these incredible musicians, I mean, one of the other producers, Glenn Barratt, he worked with Diana Ross, and Melody Gardot, and I mean it was just intense. You know? I'm sitting here, like little girl who wrote all of these songs in her bedroom, and then, "Oh there's Matt Cappy, Michael Jackson's trumpet player, it was just ... It was insane.

Brian:     Wow.

Katie:     Yeah.

Brian:     Now so you worked with all of them then. Well let me back up, so when I went and saw you, I caught you at the Ellipse Rooftop Bar, one of the gigs you had. Now it's just you and your guitar sometimes, you're doing the singer-songwriter thing.

Katie:     Yep.

Brian:     On the album there's a lot, all kinds of strings, and amazing sounds. Talk about how did your guitar singing turn into all of that.

Katie:     I sent them hundreds of songs and they chose a select handful of songs.

Brian:     Wait, wait, hundreds?

Katie:     I sent them a lot of songs.

Brian:     Okay.

Katie:     All recorded on my phone.

Brian:     On your iPhone. Okay.

Katie:     Yeah. They picked out the ones that they thought were the punchiest, most ear catching tunes that they could make into something that would be radio worthy, you know, I had never been on the radio, I had never really promoted myself in that way. I sent them all to them and I guess John Conahan, he was the arranger on the album, and he wrote out everybody's music, and everything. I think Jock, John, and Glenn, all kind of got together and created this musical piece. Before we would sit to record every song, they would kind of give me what they thought was going to happen. Like, "This is kind of what we've arranged. What do you think about it?" We'd kind of bounce ideas around, and come up with something we were all comfortable with. I was very comfortable in the studio, and I think they really made it a place where it wasn't just like, "Well, this is what we've figured out is going to be your song, and that's it, and here you go." It was beautiful. It was the chance to really cultivate something as a group, and it was all in like four days.

Brian:     Wow.

Katie:     Yeah.

Brian:     What an epic weekend and what a great result. My compliments to John, and Jock, and ...

Katie:     Glenn.

Brian:     ... and Glenn, for the amazing arranging.

Katie:     Yeah.

Brian:     Just amazing, I love the result that came from that. Now talk about you on the personal side. Outside of the music thing, what is life like for you? Hobbies, what's outside of music?

Katie:     I love working out. I do solid core, which is like a Pilates class. I like to think it's like a much harder version of a class I've ever done before. It's on like a reformer, and it kicks your butt hard, and I love it.

Brian:     Okay.

Katie:     Let's think, what else? Sadly, I'm really into reality TV.

Brian:     Stop, really?

Katie:     If we're being honest.

Brian:     Okay, all right.

Katie:     If we're being honest and this is the honest me, then yes.

Brian:     Okay. Now tell me more. What does that mean? What do you watch? What is that?

Katie:     I'm just intrigued by people's lives. I feel like there's no need to even watch fiction shows, because people are crazy, and they're so interesting. I don't know.

Brian:     It seems like fiction when you're watching reality TV.

Katie:     Yeah, like Real Housewives, and all these new shows, it's just ... No hate, I love it. Keep it up, you know?

Brian:     What's the latest one that you've been watching?

Katie:     Probably just some version of Real Housewives, or who knows? Yeah, probably Real Housewives.

Brian:     Real Housewives?

Katie:     Or Below Deck, the one about the deck crew.

Brian:     Yeah.

Katie:     I'm into it, yeah.

Brian:     That's awesome.

Katie:     So lame.

Brian:     Okay.

Katie:     It's so lame.

Brian:     All right, now what about ... What's something in your music collection that might surprise us?

Katie:     Like album wise?

Brian:     Yeah, or like song, or artists, or ...

Katie:     I don't know, I've always been into 80s music, I'm a big 80s person. I'm always ...

Brian:     Okay, what does that mean?

Katie:     I love Foreigner, and Been Waiting for a Girl Like You, that's like one of my favorite songs ever. Play it at gigs, and I don't think people realize how much I'm putting in to it. You know what I mean? I'm like, "Okay, you all have to clap, I'm clapping on the inside." I don't know.

Brian:     I think every musician has been through them clapping on the inside too, actually, that's a ... You're there, and you're playing music, and everybody is paying attention to what they're doing, and you are ... Yes.

Katie:     Yeah, you're giving it your all. That's all you can give it, right?

Brian:     That is wonderful.

Katie:     Yeah.

Brian:     I love it. Now you had mentioned your earliest memory with music, you had mentioned your parents, and playing music for the dinner table? Go back to that. Early memories of music.

Katie:     Early memories, we always listened to music at dinner. If it was your night, like if it was your turn, you would play a recent album, or recent song you'd heard. It was your chance to kind of be like, "Oh do you like it? Here it is," like a little indie band you found, my parents kind of just let me have free reign of the computer, which probably could have been a bad thing, but I just searched songs, and I just found all of these different musicians, and I just feel in love with music and kind of cultivated my own style from that.

Brian:     Is there a song that comes to mind that you played for them that was a home run, or something, that comes to mind?

Katie:     I don't know. I think often times I would play them songs thinking I was like the finder, like I would play Carol King, or something, and they would be like, "Yeah, sweetie. Mm-hmm (affirmative), yep, we've heard of her."

Brian:     We've been listening to that for years, yeah.

Katie:     Yeah, so I think I tried really hard to be cool, and my parents were like, "You're great."

Brian:     Excellent, excellent. Now, one of the last questions that I always love to ask on this show is if you could offer one piece of advice what would it be?

Katie:     I would say if music, and being an artist, is really what you want to do, just give it your all. Give it everything you have and even during the days when you think, "This is never going to be anything, and I'm never going to amount to anything as a musician," those are the days you really need to be your number one fan. If I hadn't been that, then I never would have had the chance to even step into a studio and create the masterpiece that I consider my album. No matter what comes of it, I'm proud of it, and that's ... You have to be proud of your work and kind of give it your all.

Brian:     That's hard, how do you get through those days where you just, "God, why am I doing this?" How do you do it? How do you deal with it?

Katie:     I write music, I write songs, I mean Save Me definitely didn't come from a place when I was having a great day. You know what I mean?

Brian:     True, okay.

Katie:     I think those are the times where you have to harness that energy, and that feeling, and emotion, and realize that you're probably not alone in feeling that. There's probably a ton of people who would really love to feel that with you, and be supported in the process.

Brian:     All right cool, and if folks want to find out more about you, and follow you, where do they go?

Katie:     I would say best site would be my website, KatieHargrove.com.

Brian:     Got it, KatieHargove.com. Social media?

Katie:     I'm on Instagram.

Brian:     I always like to ask, what's your favorite one? Because everybody has a favorite one that they always stick to.

Katie:     I mean, for the longest time it's been Instagram. I love Instagram, but recently it's been Twitter. I tweet a lot.

Brian:     A lot of tweeting.

Katie:     Yeah, a lot of tweeting.

Brian:     All right, she's a tweeter guys, look out.

April 4, 2017 - Special Guest: Don Zientara, Producer & Recording Engineer, Inner Ear Studio

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FROM TODAY'S SHOW

MUSIC

  1. Popular Russians by Braddock Station Garrison (Rock/Power-Pop)
  2. Ophelia by Karen Jonas (Country/Americana)
  3. Meet Me in the Middle by Peter Maybarduk (Indie/Alternative)
  4. No Easy Way Out by Staunton (Rock/Folk)
  5. Tuesday Morning by Hayley Fahey (Rock/Indie Rock)
  6. Alien Drugs by Jackie and the Treehorns (Rock/Alternative Rock)
  7. In Retrospect by Lisa Said (Folk/Alternative)

NEWS & LINKS

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-



DON ZIENTARA

VIDEO - BIO - LINKS - TRANSCRIPT

Bio from Don:

Grew up in Rochester, NY.  Had several friends in school who knew quite a bit about electronics and taught me to build/design/repair that sort of equipment.

Had old tape recorders all my life.  Also wired them so that it was a sound reinforcement system.  Experimented with electronic design and function.

Studied art at Syracuse University.  BFA in 1970.

Attended graduate school at West Virginia University, majoring in painting and printmaking.  Studied paper construction and restoration.

Was drafted into the Army in 1971.  Lottery.  Number one.

don.jpg

Signed up for electronics training.  After basic training finished, was told there was a surplus of electronic trainees, but would I want to draw and paint portraits for the Army Recruiting Support Center (Cameron Station, Alexandria)?

Accepted the invitation to work there.

Applied for, and received a CO (Conscientious Objector) in 1973.

Went to work for the National Gallery of Art as an exhibits framer and paper conservator.

After about 5 years, became the NGA's audio engineer

Stayed there for another 4 years, then went on to work as studio manager, then on my own.  Have been running Inner Ear Studio ever since.

Have 2 daughters, 5 grandkids, and 1 great-grandkid.  I surf, cook, perform music, and speak to groups (this sounds like a singles ad!!!)

Thanks!  That's all, folks!

 

 Links:

http://innerearstudio.com

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:    Don Zientara grew up in Rochester, New York. He studied at Syracuse University. In grad school at West Virginia, he majored in painting and printmaking. Don drafted into the Army in 1971. He signed up for electronics training, but after basic training finished, he was told there was a surplus of electronic trainees so instead, he was offered a position to draw and paint portraits for the Army recruiting support center, which he accepted. His career moved on to the National Gallery of Art as an exhibits framer and paper conservator, and then becoming an audio engineer, which is an amazing transition to me, and he then moved on to work as a recording studio manager, and then eventually, branching out on his own where Inner Ear Studios was born, which has been around for decades at this point.

Don Z:    Yeah.

Brian:    He's got two daughters, five grandkids, and one great-grandkid, and he also surfs, cooks, performs music, and excels in public speaking, which listeners, I got to work with Don because Fellowcraft, my band, recorded our album at Inner Ear Studios, and it was such an honor to work with him in hallowed ground with all those musicians. It's with great pleasure that I introduce Don Zientara.

Don Z:    Aren't there some trumpets somewhere that need to [crosstalk 01:13]?

Brian:    Oh, the proper introduction for you, right?

Don Z:    Exactly.

Brian:    Yes, I need to look at a sound file for some trumpets or something. That would be a great-

Don Z:    Yeah, those English horns, right?

Brian:    Exactly. Now, the first thing right off the bat, as I introduced you, it talked about how you went from the exhibits framer and paper conservator to audio engineer.

Don Z:    Yeah.

Brian:    How did that happen? Can you share that?

Don Z:    Sure. Let me back up a little bit. First of all, just to get in some of the history behind it all. I started off playing guitar because my parents wanted me to study some musical instrument.

Brian:    Nice.

Don Z:    I grew up in a Polish community and in the Polish community, there basically is one sacred instrument, which is the accordion.

Brian:    I guess that makes sense.

Don Z:    Of course.

Brian:    Polish music is kind of known for that.

Don Z:    Absolutely.

Brian:    Yeah.

Don Z:    Yeah, get out and polka.

Brian:    Yeah.

Don Z:    Luckily, I was born at a time when Elvis was coming into vogue.

Brian:    Got it.

Don Z:    I was 10 years old. They actually offered guitar lessons at the place I was at so I bailed on the accordion and I went into guitar.

Brian:    Guitar, got it, which that was more appealing?

Don Z:    Come on.

Brian:    If you're in a Polish community, it seems like accordion would be the hot thing to do.

Don Z:    You look at all the ladies and who do they flock around? The accordion player? No.

Brian:    I'd like to say the accordion player, but no, you're definitely right, it's the guitarist always. It's always the guitarist.

Don Z:    Yeah, or at least you'd like to think so, at least you'd like to think so.

Brian:    Yeah, right, exactly. Got it.

Don Z:    From there, basically, everybody joins a band if you play guitar, but we had no money for amplifiers or anything like that and so, we'd scrounge around on trash day going through and finding all these Magnavox consoles that were thrown out by the people at the time and we made speaker cabinets, a buddy of mine this is, and I had a tape recorder, a Webcor tape recorder-

Brian:    Where was this?

Don Z:    Yeah. This is in Rochester.

Brian:    You're talking about-

Don Z:    Rochester, New York.

Brian:    Rochester, New York.

Don Z:    That we turned into an actual amplifier.

Brian:    Yeah.

Don Z:    We played guitars through this tape recorder amplifier and sang through it. One little, probably about 2 watts, and coming out of these speakers from this cabinet we built out from these Magnavox consoles and it was exciting. We put all these things together and it was real interesting doing this. I had in electronics sort of, kind of dabbling in it to that degree.

      What happened was somehow I went into art school at Syracuse University. I don't know why because I was a mediocre artist, but I figured I was a mediocre artist, but I was failing in English, Math, Science, Chemistry, Biology so we'll take mediocre.

Brian:    It's the one you weren't failing in, is that-

Don Z:    Yeah, it was the one I wasn't failing in.

Brian:    Got it.

Don Z:    Then graduate there, went to West Virginia University like you said and then, I was caught up in the draft lottery.

Brian:    Oh, which was-

Don Z:    You don't remember that? You're too young.

Brian:    Full disclosure, I was not around for the draft lottery at that point, but what I'm curious about is, from everything I've heard, that's a hot topic at the time?

Don Z:    Yeah.

Brian:    That was a contested thing. When you got caught up in that, was it incredibly traumatic? Did you just accept it? What ...

Don Z:    This is the Vietnam War going on and there were a lot of deferments and what was happening was because of all these deferments, some of the people in Congress were saying, "This is not fair. The inequality is all over the place. What we're going to do is we're just going to pick birth dates out of a container like a lottery and we're going to pick number one, number two, number ... " and I was number one in the whole thing.

Brian:    Oh, you were the big winner.

Don Z:    I was the big winner in the thing.

Brian:    Got it.

Don Z:    I was definitely going to go in and I checked upon it and they had some programs going on. I figured I'd keep that in the back of my mind, but I was drafted. I was selected for the draft and when you're selected for the draft, you basically have to have a physical. Everybody knows that, you have an army physical.

Brian:    Yeah.

Don Z:    I went to West Virginia University that year. I said, "I can't take a physical. I'm at West Virginia. I'm in Morgantown, West Virginia." They scrambled and they got things together and moved the physical around to Morgantown. I was back for Christmas vacation in Rochester. I said, "I can't take it. I'm in Rochester, New York." They scrambled around and they fixed it up for Rochester. I was back at West Virginia University again. Come summer time, they got me.

     I figured why don't I get some formal training in electronics? I went into that program, they guaranteed training electronics, went through basic training, went to the place where the school was and waited and then waited some more and waited some more and waited some more. Eventually, I was called into maybe the front office there and they said, "You have a guarantee and we will honor it for this electronic training, but at the moment, there's too many people doing it. We just happen to have a position open in Alexandria, Virginia for people to draw and paint. Would you want to do that?" I figured for about two seconds, would I want to draw and paint rather than shoot people with a gun?

Brian:    The answer was yes, clearly.

Don Z:    The answer was yes, yeah. I took a moment to think about that and so, I came to Alexandria, Virginia, like you said with the recruiting support center there. I got to work on exhibits. That gave me my first taste into presentations as a whole.

Brian:    Oh.

Don Z:    Whether it's audio or visual, I was into presentations and I loved it.

Brian:    Got it.

Don Z:    I went through that thing. As it was, I got out on a CO. I applied for a CO and got out. This was about 1973. Then, I went to the National Gallery of Art.

Don Z:    Worked there matting and framing and doing a little bit of conservation work for getting exhibits ready. Once again, we're in exhibits, we're into presentation.

Don Z:    Eventually, after about five years there, they were giving a tour around to some of the places in the gallery and they were building a recording studio and we toured that. They were hooking things up and wiring things up [inaudible 07:56]. They had problems with the power supply there. I said, "All you have to do is connect it up like this."

Brian:    Yeah.

Don Z:    They said, "Hey, do you want to run this place?"

Brian:    Do you want do this? Yeah.

Don Z:    Yeah, exactly.

Brian:    That's how it happened?

Don Z:    That's how it happened.

Brian:    Just because you fixed ...

Don Z:    Yeah.

Brian:    I love it. Wait, then fast-forward then, so that was how long? You were there for how long?

Don Z:    I was there five years in prints and drawings.

Brian:    Five years.

Don Z:    Then, I was there for about another four or five years in the electronics section, the audio recording section.

Brian:    How did that then become Inner Ear Studios? Was that ...

Don Z:    I went from there to managing a studio, which didn't work out because I couldn't get my hands dirty.

Brian:    Uh-oh, because you were fixing and you were recording-

Don Z:    Yeah, I was pushing papers all the time, administering it, manager.

Brian:    Right.

Don Z:    I didn't like that so, I just started doing stuff totally on my ... Now, I had been recording all this time already.

Brian:    Yeah.

Don Z:    Because I record a lot of the early, Teen Idles, Minor Threat, all that stuff.

Brian:    Yeah, at that time, was that in your basement?

Don Z:    Yes.

Brian:    Was it at the location now?

Don Z:    In my basement.

Brian:    How did you get linked up with them? Just the underground network, they heard of you or how did that happen?

Don Z:    That's a every interesting thing. There's parallel universes going on. I was playing in bands all these times and one of the bands I was in had Robert Goldstein for a guitarist and he has since passed away, but he-

Brian:    For those who don't know, who's Robert Goldstein?

Don Z:    Robert Goldstein was the music librarian towards the end of his life for NPR.

Brian:    Oh. Got it.

Don Z:    He was also a very progressive guitarist and we were like a folk rock band. We played a lot of covers and stuff like that, but he had more talent than I think I had for sure.

Brian:    Right.

Don Z:    Eventually, the band broke up. He went into a band that was more to his taste and called me to record one time when they're playing at I think it was American University. Playing on the same bill were The Slickee Boys so they said, "Hey, you got an extra roll of tape?" I did so I recorded them. Their manager at the time was Skip Groff who was Yesterday and Today Records and he knew all the punk people. I didn't even know punk was around.

Brian:    Right.

Don Z:    I didn't know anything about it, but he came in and worked with the Slickee Boys to mix their tapes and everything and said, "I'd like to bring over some people. These guys, Teen Idles, they might have something to do here." So he came over with them and this, the relationship with a lot of the guys in that band and a little later on he said, "You know, there's a black punk band that I'd like to bring over there. Would you work with them if you don't mind?" I said, "Yeah, sure, sure."

Brian:    Yeah.

Don Z:    They sound good and that was the Bad Brains.

Brian:    Wow.

Don Z:    I was immersed into all this because of just serendipity a lot, very much.

Brian:    I know people are curious because I know I'm curious, too, how did that evolve into ... There's an HBO special at your place, the Foo Fighters recorded at Inner Ear Studios. Did that network continue or how did you get linked up with Dave?

Don Z:    It continued. No, it continued and Scream and Dain Bramage, I did not record Dain Bramage, but I recorded Scream and they were ... Punk was evolving.

Brian:    Yeah.

Don Z:    Punk was evolving more towards the ... It had a little bit of a pop feel to it. Kingface, there were some groups like that and Scream was one of them that had ... They could sing well and they put a really good melody behind songs.

Brian:    Yeah.

Don Z:    Kingface was the same way. A lot of the punk groups were doing that. Basically, I recorded them so I knew Dave from back then.

Brian:    I see.

Don Z:    Then when he broke up ... Didn't break up with Nirvana. Nirvana sort of broke up.

Brian:    Dissolved, yeah.

Don Z:    Dissolved, right, that's a good word.

Brian:    Yeah.

Don Z:    Yes. He came over and he said, "We've got these demos I want to record. Do you want to record these things?" I recorded the demos for him and I actually asked him, "What's the band going to be called?" He said, "The Foo Fighters." I said, "That's a stupid name," yeah.

Brian:    You told him it was stupid?

Don Z:    Yeah.

Brian:    What did he say? [Crosstalk 12:37]

Don Z:    I have struck out on names for bands. The Dismemberment Plan, I took Jason Caddell aside one time and said, "Jason, you've got to change the name of the band. Dismemberment Plan, no one's going to remember that. Come on. Let's get real. Let's get something in there."

Brian:    Yeah.

Don Z:    I have not had a good track record with names of bands. They just haven't worked out with me.

Brian:    Man. Some of these are big personalities that are in the studio. What do you do? You were talking earlier about the conflict between people or we joked marital problems or stuff, when that stuff happens, do you get involved? Do you purposely not get involved?

Don Z:    First of all, usually, people will act on a professional basis and these could be local people, too.

Brian:    Yeah.

Don Z:    They know how to focus pretty well. They don't get involved in a lot of stuff. A lot of the times, it's the people who are, and I'll use the term loosely, amateurs that want to be all over the place. They want to pick their own microphones out. They want to pick the position of the [mount 13:41] in front of the amplifier and, "Why are you using this and why don't we use this? I've seen this being used on YouTube. We should try that," and all that.

     As an engineer I try different things at different points, but as a musician, you should ... I'm speaking for myself, you should not concern yourself with that in a way. You should concern yourself with the way it sounds. You are there to look at the sound of things and making sure that your instrument, whether it's a voice, a guitar amplifier or a base amplifier or a drum set sounds the way you want it to sound. At that point, you can say, "We need more snap in the snare or we need more bottom end to the kick drum."

Brian:    I see.

Don Z:    Not, "We need to use an AKG112 for the kick drum because I've heard that Def Leppard uses that when they record."

Brian:    I got it. Now, I'm with you. All right, and one more question because I want to make sure we place more of the music in here about your work with some of these other artists, but the one question that I love to offer that I'd love to know from you is if you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be?

Don Z:    Focus.

Brian:    Focus.

Don Z:    Focus, rehearse. Focus on what you're doing. Focus on your job and what you're doing and be critical. Be critical. Make sure that everything is turning out the way you want it to turn out, but you need to remember that you have a certain job that you could do 100%. Everybody has their own job and everybody wears a different hat and we should keep it that way.

Brian:    Yeah. Got it. Profound. Now, for those folks who are interested in finding out more about you and what you've got going on, is there a website or where should they go to find that out?

Don Z:    I don't know. Wikipedia?

Brian:    You're just out there doing it. Look up Don Zientara on Wikipedia. That is one way to do it.

Don Z:    Yeah.

Brian:    Innerearstudio.com, check out the website.

Don Z:    Inner Ear Studio has some stuff, but I don't have a website myself. I just call and talk-

Brian:    Got it.

Don Z:    Hey, if anybody wants to call me, call the studio. I talk to them. If anybody's got ideas or wants answers to questions, I love talking about recording, microphones, tape recorders, anything along that line.

Brian:    Got it. All right. Give him a call.