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Fellow Creatures

January 24, 2017 - Special Guest: Elena Lacayo, of Elena & Los Fulanos

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FROM TODAY'S SHOW

NEWS

  • This is the 30th Episode!  Many more to come, proud to reach this epic milestone!
  • The Easy Listening Jams Playlist of DC artists is up!  Check it out on the Find-Browse Artists page
  • Tiny Desk Videos for NPR.  I'm collecting the ones for local artists for 2017.  Please share/tag me so I can add them!  Playlist will be posted on the Find-Browse Artists Page

MUSIC

  1. Lost Children - Sam Hesh (Indie/Indie Rock)
  2. Himalayan Honey - Tempercrush (Rock)
  3. Amor Migrante - Elena & Los Fulanos (Latin/World)
  4. Step in Line - Letitia VanSant & the Bonafides (Folk/Indie Folk)
  5. Amneshia - Thaylobleu (Hard Rock/Punk Rock)
  6. Allies - Fellow Creatures (Rock/Indie)
  7. Intro/Outro music by Fellowcraft (Hard Rock/Blues)

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-



Elena Lacayo, of Elena & Los Fulanos

Video - Bio - Photos - Links

Bio

DC Music Rocks Elena & Los Fulanos 2

Elena & Los Fulanos is a bilingual, folk rock band based in Washington, DC. Since 2011, they have been creating music that ranges from twangy, heartbreak-themed, folk Americana, to soothing, introspective, violin-infused, Latin rock. Influenced by front-woman Elena Lacayo’s experience growing up in two cultures (Nicaraguan and American), Elena & Los Fulanos creates a world where language and tradition meld with catchy melodies and inventive chords to enhance appreciation for diversity in an increasingly multi-cultural world. Their debut album, Miel Venenosa, earned a Washington Area Music Association (WAMMIE) nomination for Best Latin Recording in 2014.

 
DC Music Rocks Elena & Los Fulanos 1
 
DC Music Rocks Elena & Los Fulanos (3)

Interview Transcript

Brian:     Elena Lacayo is the lead singer of Elena & Los Fulanos, a bilingual folk rock band based here in Washington DC. Since 2011, they've been creating music that ranges from twangy, heartfelt themed folk Americana to soothing, introspective, violin infused, Latin rock. Elena musical influences draw on her experiences growing up in two cultures, Nicaraguan and American. Elena & Los Fulanos creates a world where language and tradition meld with catch melodies and inventive chords in our increasingly multi-cultural world. Their debut album, help me with the pronunciation here. Debut album was?

Elena:    This one's the harder one, Miel Venensoa.

Brian:     Miel Venensoa earned a Washington Area Music Award or a Wammie nomination for the Best Latin Recording in 2014.

Elena:    Miel Venenosa means poisonous honey, just for the.

Brian:     Poisonous honey. Interesting. We just heard Himalayan Honey earlier from this so wow, we got all kinds of honey on this show today. I love it. I first came across Elena & Los Fulanos when I had, and her name escapes me at this moment when I need it, on the microphone, Maryjo Mateo was on the show. She was doing a show coming up with you guys and she said, "Oh you definitely got to check out Elena." I checked out Elena and my goodness, amazing things. Listeners, it's with great pleasure that I introduce Elena Lacayo.

Elena:    Hey. How's it going everyone?

Brian:     Now tell us about you Elena. How did Elena & Los Fulanos come about? Tell us the quick story.

Elena:    Oh the quick story. You were starting to ask me about me, and I was going to go into that.

Brian:     Oh we'll come back to that, I promise.

Elena:    We'll come back to that because that is a big part of what Elena & Los Fulanos is, but I was working here in DC like so many people on policy. I moved here 10 years ago and I've been doing music and creating original songs. I was playing out and a couple of my friends were like, "Hey. I can play with you." That's kind of how we started it.

Brian:     Nice.

Elena:    We started it kind of informally and I just realized with time that I liked a lot what we were doing and I quit my job and started doing it more seriously. That's where we are now.

Brian:     Wow, so full time musician. Now tell us what you were going to say about how the music came about in your life.

Elena:    It's just that I do bilingual music. You guys only heard a song in Spanish, but there's also songs in English. At this point, I mean basically when I started the project I was a little like, well what am I supposed to do? I have songs in English and I have songs in Spanish. Do I do separate projects? Are they the same thing? Eventually I came to the conclusion that if these two things existed in my own person that they should be able to exist in a music project. That's sort of what the point is, is that people will look at me and they'll think one thing, but I actually grew up in Nicaragua and that's where my parents live. I also grew up in the states. I was born here and then we moved back when I was eight. I really grew up between the US and Nicaragua. Those are both fully parts of me and I'm fully Nicaraguan and fully American. That's kind of what we do with our music. We show that identities are more complex than what meets the eye.

Brian:     Yeah. It definitely comes across that way. The breadth, I love the breadth of your music. It's a very, not every song. It's not the same each time. There's different feelings. There's different emotions. It comes across in the music you make.

Elena:    Yeah. I almost think I'm a little musically schizophrenic. That's how I kind of consider myself, which I've decided is a better place to be than listening to a band and feeling like every song sounds the same. I'd rather be more broad than not. Really, it's interesting. When I'm putting together albums, instead of trying to make things match with each other. It's almost more narrative and it's almost more about showing the diversity of things that we do. Making sure we kind of show. If songs are too similar, we don't put them on the same album.

Brian:     Right.

Elena:    Which is interesting.

Brian:     Smart. Okay.

Elena:    You know what I mean?

Brian:     What about you, so outside of Los Fulanos. What's life like for you? What do you do in your spare time I guess you would say?

Elena:    Oh man. Well, I mean I do a lot of solo shows, which is really fun. I do all kinds of stuff as a solo artist. Now that certain things have happened politically, I'm getting a lot of requests to play movement events. I play a lot of pro-immigrant events. This weekend was kind of crazy for me. I ended up playing planned and unplanned shows. People are really hungry for this kind of music. I also work at a café, a social justice café in DC called The Potter's House, which is awesome. They have a bookstore and I help run it because I'm into books. That's kind of what I studied when I was in undergrad. It's really cool though. I mean they are sort of similar. It's sort of related to be into books and into music, both in the inability to make money off of it unfortunately. Also, just like in the fact that these are things that really shape our culture and our collective consciousness as a people. It's really cool to be in the world of ideas like that.

Brian:     That's cool. You said into books. Does that mean you read a lot of books or you just are comforted by being around them? What do you read?

Elena:    All of the above. Since I work at a bookstore, I buy a bunch of books and then I don't necessarily always have time to get to them. Unfortunately I'm much better at going to shows. I'm much better about going to shows than I am about sitting down and reading books. I'm a bit of an extrovert and music is really my focus. It's really cool to be around the world of books because people always give you their opinions even if you haven't read them, or you learn about people that are important that even if you haven't read them, you know, oh this was a very important person in the Civil Rights movement. Sometimes those people come into the cafes too. Then they'll tell who they are. They're like, "Oh I'm a SNCC leader. I grew up in Mississippi" and she's like 92 or something. It's really cool to be in that world and social justice is kind of my background and so that's a lot of what also informs my music.

Brian:     Yeah. I realize you said SNCC leader, and for those who don't know what that is, what is that?

Elena:    Oh, what is the acronym. Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. They were a big organization. John Lewis belonged to that. If you guys saw the movie, the one about MLK. [Some 00:06:53] I think it was called?

Brian:     Yes.

Elena:    The SNCC leaders are the younger folks who are kind of the ones who are the ones out on the.

Brian:     They come into the café. That's cool.

Elena:    They're pretty hard core, standing up for their rights. It's really cool to meet people who confronted such bigotry and such hatred to their face. You know what I mean? And stood up for it.

Brian:     What about you as an artist? The biggest success moment that comes to mind?

Elena:    Our biggest success, just happened the day after Thanksgiving we had this awesome opportunity to play at the Kennedy Center here. We played the Millennium Stage.

Brian:     Wow.

Elena:    It was something else. It's such a big stage in a lot of ways and nothing quite prepares you to do it until you do it. Then you realize, wow. You feel like the shoes are slightly too big for you to fill but at the end of it.

Brian:     You jump in and you say, "Absolutely. I'll wear them. Let's go."

Elena:    Totally, and it was so cool. I mean one of the things that I didn't expect from it as much is there's a lot of things I knew that would come with it. We had a huge crowd, like 500 people. It was the day after Thanksgiving so everybody was free and stuff. That was just amazing opportunity. They also had this amazing video that they did. They do videos of all of the Millennium Stage shows. They have multiple cameras and so they are-

Brian:     Awesome.

Elena:    A lot of people actually when I got off stage that came around and they were like, "Dude, the cinematography," or whatever you call the camera work, "was really great. You really need to watch it." Of course, as an artist, you take your time getting to watch yourself perform because you're very critical of yourself on stage, especially when you have to hear yourself talk. That was actually one of the coolest parts about the whole thing, is just having this really, super well produced video for your show, for your vision, for your art.

Brian:     Do you have that posted somewhere?

Elena:    Oh yeah. Absolutely.

Brian:     Can people watch that? Kennedy Center website or yours?

Elena:    Yeah. There's the Kennedy Center YouTube. You can also go to our band's website, it's elenalosfulanos.com, E-L-E-N-A-L-O-S-F-U-L-A-N-O-S .com, or if you Google Elena Los Fulanos, it'll be the first one to come up. There's a video part there and you can go to that. You can also see our video for Amor Migrante.

Brian:     Yeah check out the video. I've got those links on dcmusicrocks.com too so you can check them out after the show. Now what about your earliest memory with music?

Elena:    Well, legend has it. I'm the youngest of four.

Brian:     We started with a legend?

Elena:    Yeah a legend. It's because I don't know if to believe my parents on this. You know? I'm the youngest of four so when they talk about things that I did when I was, and we were like refugees. We had just come to the states from Nicaragua and we were fleeing war. I don't really think they remember my first anythings. I kind of feel like they make it up a little bit.

Brian:     Mom, Dad, we want to believe you but we're not sure. Okay.

Elena:    I was like, "Mom, Dad, what was my first word?" They were like, "You didn't speak you just sang." That's what they tell me.

Brian:     That sounds like something a parent would say.

Elena:    I know that my first song was The Blue Danube. That's kind of high brow but it's because my oldest brother is trained in French horn and I guess he probably was rehearsing and stuff. I don't know how I got The Blue Danube. You guys know which one that? La, dum, dum, dum, dump, bum-bum, bum-bum.

Brian:     Oh, and there's words to that?

Elena:    No. I would just hum it.

Brian:     Okay you were humming. Okay.

Elena:    Apparently.

Brian:     You were singing the horn part.

Elena:    They were like, "Oh cool. She's in tune. This one has potential."

Brian:     Real potential, and now look at you. You're here. You're performing the Kennedy Center.

Elena:    I know, well that wasn't. I was very rebellious towards my parents and their desire for me to be a musician. I really never took that role and I didn't really care for music classes. I kind of did it on my own terms, which I'm not sure I recommend because I'm pretty uninformed when it comes to music theory and a lot of the rules but, it hasn't yet effected my ability to write it. I think it more effects my ability to communicate with other musicians.

Brian:     Yeah I could see that.

Elena:    It works out.

Brian:     I was saying, it's working so far. Now, one of my favorite questions to ask is always, what's one piece of advice that you would offer?

Elena:    To other musicians?

Brian:     Sure. However, you want to answer the question.

Elena:    I think, I mean maybe it sounds corny but I think it's being true to one's self and being authentic to the person that you are. Try to figure that out. It's actually much more difficult than you think when you start the exercise.

Brian:     Say more on that.

Elena:    Just in the sense of like, music is an externalization of yourself. Art in general is an externalization of your interior world. You know? The more that you explore yourself and you know yourself the better you will be able to access that so as to bring your vision to other people. There's something about reaching the authentic point of yourself, that connects with other people. It's sort of like you access this universal concept and you put it out there. Other people will access that same thing, but through their own experience. The more authentic that you are, it doesn't really matter what form it takes. That's the thing about music, it's so subjective. There's really no formula to what's great and what's not. I think what clearly comes through is when you're being authentic to yourself and when you're rounded in a vision of what, kind of who you are. It's weird. I mean it's like kind of a [inaudible 00:12:59] to talk about.

                  It's the same idea of you know when people have gone in to buy guitars or to try out guitars at guitar stores. It kind of doesn't matter how much the guitar costs, or what it's made out of or all these other specs, what counts is when yo sit down and play the guitar, do you feel inspired by it? There are some guitars where you feel that and there are some guitars where you're like, eh not really. I don't really want to play that much anymore. It's like this intangible thing.

Brian:     Got it.

Elena:    Yeah.

Brian:     Wow, that's cool. Two questions then, together. One is, if folks want to find out more about you, and the exciting things going on wit Los Fulanos, where do they go for that, and you had mentioned to me before the show that there were some cool things coming up for you. Talk about that.

Elena:    If you want to check us out more, you can go to elenalosfulanos.com or if you want to just Google Elena & Los Fulanos. That has all of our info. It has our videos, also has our music video for Amor Migrante, which you can check out there. We are actually raising money right now through Indiegogo. We have a campaign going on for our next album. If you all are interested in that, you can check that out as well on our website. We have a fundraising show for that on February 9th at Haydee's in Mount Pleasant and you all can come to that and check out what we're planning to do and if you want to go to an actual show, that's open to everybody and mostly about fundraising. This Friday I will be at The Black Cat with the Nine Songwriter Series. That's Friday, January 27th at The Black Cat. I can do this. Oh look at that.

Brian:     There is video of this interview and if you check it out, she's holding up the card here so you can actually see her talking to you on video.

January 10, 2017 - Special Guest: Stephanie Williams of DC Music Download

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FROM TODAY'S SHOW

NEWS

MUSIC

  1. Mrs. Piano - Kenny Sway (Pop/R&B)
  2. Orca - Moogatu (Hard Rock/Jam Band)
  3. I'll Walk Away - Stone Driver (Rock/Hard Rock)
  4. Paused Parade - Young Summer (Indie/Alternative)
  5. Silurian Stomp (feat. Rachel Ries) - Fellow Creatures (Rock/Indie)
  6. The Greys - The El Mansouris (Indie)
  7. Intro/Outro music by Fellowcraft (Hard Rock/Blues)

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STEPHANIE WILLIAMS

Video - Bio - Photos - Links

DC Music Rocks Stephanie Williams

Bio

Stephanie Williams is the founder and chief curator of D.C. Music Download, D.C.'s largest outlet for local music news. An Ohio native, Stephanie moved to D.C. in 2009 and started D.C. Music Download in 2012 to spotlight some of the awesome acts she discovered while living in the city. Five years later, D.C. Music Download has grown from a small blog into a full-fledged media company that includes a flourishing editorial, events, and cinematography division.

Links

http://dcmusicdownload.com/

https://twitter.com/DCMUSICDOWNLOAD

https://www.facebook.com/dcmusicdownload/

DC Music Rocks Stephanie Williams Head Shot
DC Music Rocks DC Music Download Group Stephanie Williams

Interview Transcript

Brian:     Stephanie Williams is the founder and chief … Editor in Chief of D.C. Music Download. It’s D.C.’s largest outlet for local music news. She’s an Ohio native and moved here in 2009, and D.C. Music Download came around in 2012 to spotlight some of the incredible acts that she discovered while she was living in the city in the D.C. area.

                  Five years later, D.C. Music Download has grown from a small little blog into this full-fledged media company that includes a flourishing editorial events and cinematography division, so D.C. Music Download has grown and along with the great scene here. Listeners, with that, it’s my great pleasure that I get to introduce the founder and Editor in Chief of D.C. Music Download, Stephanie Williams. Say hi, Stephanie.

Stephanie:           Hey. What’s going on?

Brian:     It is such a treat to have you here, and tell us the story, the brief story about D.C. Music Download now. How did it start? How did that happen?

Stephanie:           Sure, so it happened a little serendipitously I guess you would say. Long story short, back in college, I was a broadcast journalism major, and I was doing a lot of the same things that I’m doing right now, covering a lot of the local artists and bands that were living in the city and just putting the word out there about some of the awesome acts that I was finding. That came and went, moved to D.C. in 2009 to start an internship at Discovery Channel which grew into a full-time job eventually.

Brian:     Wow.

Stephanie:           Yeah. That was good, and I was doing the corporate thing for a while, but I felt like there was something missing getting back into that element of getting back into the music scene, going to shows, and just putting myself in that world again, so around I would say like 2011, started going to more concerts, started meeting more people in the scene, started going to more D.C. shows, and discovering some awesome bands from there. Around that time, I was like, “You know what? I feel like this kind of clicks with what I want to do creatively, which is to get back into covering music again.”

                  The origin of D.C. Music Download’s name is actually because it was originally supposed to be a podcast, only outlet, and we didn’t have any writers like any of the people that we have right now in terms of like editorial, so it was just myself, my recorder, and just doing the thing.

Brian:     You blew my mind because I’ve been dying to know. I picked up D.C. Music Download in about 2013 or 2014. It just came on my radar, and I’ve been wondering, “It’s called ‘D.C Music Download.’ Why is there a ‘Download’ because it’s a news or it’s a …?” That’s so fascinating. It was a podcast?

Stephanie:           Yeah. It was a podcast, and so I bought the domain thinking, “Okay. All my podcasts are going to be on here, and you can literally just download it from the site,” and so that’s where it came from.

Brian:     Yeah. Wow.

Stephanie:           Yeah, and then from there, I started finding more people along the way who were interested in contributing more than just the podcast, so then it grew into what it is now which is a news magazine site that … It was just funny now because the podcast is input to the wayside for all the stuff that we do now, so we have a staff of around 30 people who produce all sorts of content.

                  Amazing, amazing contributions. Everything from show reviews to amazing interviews, long form features, events, and we even have a cinematography staff who creates amazing beautifully shot videos for us. It definitely have grown into something much bigger than I anticipated, but I mean, definitely, it’s been a pretty awesome ride in terms of just seeing it grow and just seeing where everything lies ahead.

Brian:     If somebody was curious if they’ve never heard of D.C. Music Download or we were to tell them to check it out, what are they … You were talking about some of the things that you do, but what are the things that D.C. Music Download does really well? What will they find?

Stephanie:           I think this is primarily what keeps me going with D.C. Music Download. It’s a pretty big effort, a large endeavor, and I think honestly what keeps me going is the fact of telling stories that we feel are really important, bringing to light issues, topics in the community, people who were doing awesome things here, and just bringing to light those people who may not get the attention or maybe the notoriety that they should get and just put it in the forefront and tell people like, “Hey. I mean, this is something that you should pay attention to,” or, “This is a great band you should know or just a cool project that you might not even realize is happening right in your own backyard that you should check out.” Yeah. I think that’s honestly the most rewarding part of doing this is just being able to spotlight those stories that may not be as easily noticed to the public.

Brian:     Wow, that’s really cool. All right. Now, tell us about Stephanie outside of D.C. Music Download.

Stephanie:           Yeah. For me, I actually just started this as my full-time thing which is pretty exciting.

Brian:     Congratulations.

Stephanie:           Thanks.

Brian:     That’s … so full-time Editor in Chief like this is it.

Stephanie:           Yeah. This is it.

Brian:     Wow.

Stephanie:           It’s been pretty crazy. Honestly, it’s one of those things where it’s like you just do it and see what happens.

Brian:     Yeah

Stephanie:           Yeah. For a while, I was in the corporate sort of industry, doing that behind the scenes. In a way, I feel like my personal life and D.C.M.D. are very much intertwined. I see this as like my life and just all the stuff that I’m doing right now is stuff that it’s not like I separate the two at all. It’s all combined into …

Brian:     Does this mean you pretty much just work seven days a week and it doesn’t feel like work? Is that what it is?

Stephanie:           Yeah. Very much so in terms of it not feeling like work.

Brian:     Got it.

Stephanie:           Yeah. I try to go to shows as much as I can. I’m not getting any younger. I’ll say that. Going out to shows isn’t as easy as it used to be. Going out like multiple shows a night and like all that stuff. I’ve been trying my hardest, but just trying to go as many shows, trying to discover as many new bands and songs as possible, and just …

Brian:     Is it just music, or what other hobbies do you have? Tell us more about Stephanie.

Stephanie:           Yeah. For me, it’s funny because for me, I actually just … besides music, I like to also … I’m pretty artistic, so I like to do a lot of painting. Also, I love just going out and exploring art, going to …

Brian:     Wow. Yeah. Uh-huh (affirmative).

Stephanie:           One of my favorite museums actually that I like to go to, and just like meditate, and just be by myself is the Smithsonian American Art Museum and Portrait Gallery. It’s like you can go there all day, just walk around and …

Brian:     Is that the one with the courtyard in the middle too that …?

Stephanie:           Yeah, it’s a great place to go. I love being in the outdoors which like you can’t really do much of that now with …

Brian:     Right, since it’s winter and stuff.

Stephanie:           Yeah, yeah. I love going out, just being outside, and just being able to just meditate and just be able to relax, and so that’s what I like to do, just going hiking anywhere I can find that’s just a good place to be alone in that sense.

Brian:     Absolutely.

Brian:     When you think back to D.C. Music Download now, what’s the funniest moment that comes to mind?

Stephanie:           The funniest moment that comes to mind. I will say that we have a really awesome staff, and we usually … Every year, we go and do a bar crawl for the holidays, so we usually go …

Brian:     Awesome. Okay.

Stephanie:           We usually start at Satellite Room, and then we’ll see who’s left at the end of the night. It goes from like 20 people to like three people. Last year, we ended up doing this big pub crawl. Down U Street is where we usually go. It was funny because we went to … I think it was Cloak and Dagger which used to be Patty Boom Boom, and so one of our staff members wanted to … This is like towards the end of the night, by the way, so like people are having fun, whatever, and somebody want to do the rain dance, so they literally took the umbrella, started doing the rain dance in the middle of the club. Some guy and this … Literally, this like big bodyguard came downstairs and literally just like snatched the umbrella like full-hand just snatched it, and he’s like, “Sir, you got to go.” He’s like, “But it’s raining, and I don’t have my camera with me,” and he’s like … and I’m just like, “Dude, let’s just get out of here.

Brian:     Let’s just go?

Stephanie:           Yeah, and it was so funny because he was like all like stressed out, and he was like running out into the street in the rain. I’m like, “Oh, that’s … Poor, poor guy.”

Brian:     Oh my goodness. Wow.

Stephanie:           Yeah, he … Yeah, we have a lot of fun together. Besides doing like stuff for D.C.M.D., we always like to hang out behind the scenes. Yeah.

Brian:     Absolutely. What about … When you think about biggest success moments now, what’s like the biggest success moment that comes to mind with the project?

Stephanie:           For me, I would probably say our anniversary shows at 9:30 Club, so particularly the first one that we did back in 2014. Up until then, we only had done like maybe two small shows at Rock and Roll Hotel. Like we had like no track record with putting on big shows at that capacity, so that was the first big event that we did that we were like, “Okay. Let’s see how far we’ve come and what we can do,” and so we decided to put together this awesome lineup. We had Drop Electric play, The Sea Life, Young Rapids, and The Raised By Wolves at that time, and it was just … We also had Girls Rock D.C. involved, and it was a … It was like definitely one of … probably the highlight for me. There’s been a lot of other concerts have been awesome, but this one particularly stood out because we ended up selling out that venue that night.

Brian:     Wow.

Stephanie:           Yeah, 1,500 capacity venue that I did not think in my wildest dreams that we’d be able to do, especially at that early in our lifespan.

Stephanie:           It was just so cool to see so many people turn out. The thing is a lot of people didn’t know. They’ll come to see one band, but a lot of them stayed for the whole show just like checking out new music and just being supportive of the D.C. music scene that night.

Stephanie:           I think that was definitely, definitely a highlight for me that stood out.

Brian:     Definitely. I always love to ask, what’s one thing you have in your music collection that might surprise us?

Stephanie:           Okay, so my mom is Korean.

Stephanie:           She actually exposed me to a lot of K-pop which …

Brian:     Oh, yeah? Okay.

Stephanie:           Yeah, which is like … Like usually, in that, like I’m not … Like it’s one of those things where I would never have thought.

Brian:     I should … so if they don’t know what K-pop is, that’s just Korean pop? 

Stephanie:           Yeah, it’s Korean pop.

Brian:     Okay.

Stephanie:           Really like … It’s just like super poppy, very … What I love about it is just … It’s just so catchy, and it’s just like …

Brian:     Is this like Gangnam Style that …?

Stephanie:           Kind of. Yeah. I listen to a little bit of the girl groups. There’s like Girls’ Generation. There’s F(X). F(X) I love. It’s like this five-girl group that they each have like their own very distinct styles.

Stephanie:           They have like a very … not really so much pop, but more so like electronic, dance type of music, and they’re really good about like experimenting and diversifying their sound, so it’s …

 

Brian:     That’s cool.

Stephanie:           Yeah, and it’s just crazy because I feel like once I gotten to one band, it just segued into just knowing all these other bands that I like would never have discovered, so it’s …

Brian:     That’s awesome.

Stephanie:           Yeah, so it’s random

Brian:     So K-pop? All right. I dig it.

Stephanie:           Yeah, so K-pop.

Brian:     The last question I love to ask is, what’s the one piece of advice you would offer?

Stephanie:           One piece of advice that I would offer is to not psych yourself out when it comes to thinking that something, especially a goal that you have in mind is too big because I always feel like anything is possible, but it just depends on the time. Like sometimes, you might have a goal, and maybe you weren’t able to reach it at that time because it just wasn’t the right time or you weren’t ready for it yet.

                  I think with us, there’s just so many instances where I thought that was the case. Like 9:30 Club and us selling it out that year, like that probably wouldn’t have happened prior to it because we just weren’t ready yet, and we just weren’t able to be at that capacity to do it at that time, but I think … Yeah, I think just set what you want, and then just be realistic about how you’re going to get there. You’ll get there. It’s just a matter of when.

Brian:     Just figure it out and do it.

Stephanie:           Yeah.

Brian:     I love that. Great, great stuff. Now, for folks who want to find out more about you and the cool things that are going on and happening with you, where do they go? What are the best sources for them?

Stephanie:           All right, so the best one is obviously dcmusicdownload.com. We’re also on Facebook at the same handle, D.C. Music Download. Twitter, same handle. Also, we’re on Instagram as well, same handle.

Brian:     Got it, so social media and the website? That’s the best …

Stephanie:           Yes, and on snapchat