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Aaron Tinjum & The Tangents

December 20, 2016 - Special Guest: Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents

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FROM TODAY'S SHOW

NEWS

MUSIC

  1. Prozac & Merlot - The Sea Life (Rock/Garage Rock)
  2. Sleigh Ride - Wylder (Rock/Pop)
  3. The Wild and Beyond - Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents (Rock/Folk Rock)
  4. Small Blade - Stranger in the Alps (Folk)
  5. Antelope - Louis Weeks (Pop/Electronic)
  6. Home - Cynthia Marie (Pop/Jazz Folk)
  7. Kool Kids - Justin Trawick (Bluegrass)
  8. Intro/Outro music by Fellowcraft (Hard Rock/Blues)

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AARON TINJUM AND THE TANGENTS

VIDEO - BIO - PHOTOS - TRANSCRIPT

BIO

DC's Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents released their new full-length album Foreign & Domestic earlier this year with a release show at Rock & Roll Hotel. The folk rock project originally formed in Austin, Texas where they were recognized by the Austin Mayor and City Council with their own official band holiday holiday. Since relocating to DC in 2013, they have opened for the likes of James McCartneyKawehi and Sam Amidon

LINKS

www.aarontinjum.com 

www.facebook.com/AaronTinjum

www.twitter.com/AaronTinjum 

www.soundcloud.com/AaronTinjum

www.youtube.com/TinjumAndTheTangents

aaron tinjum dc music rocks

The new animated music video they discussed in the episode:


INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:     D.C.'s Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents released their new, full length album, Foreign and Domestic, earlier this year, with a release show at Rock and Roll hotel. The folk rock group originally from Austin, Texas, where they were recognized by the city mayor and the city council with their own official band holiday. They relocated back up to D.C., and we consider ourselves so lucky to have them here back in 2013, and are continuing that great tradition of awesome music up here in D.C.

                  Guys, I first heard of these guys when they ... I stumbled across them online, they submitted their stuff to me, I was listening. I saw the bit about ... If you haven't seen, there was a video, what we talked about on October 11th, is their official band holiday in Austin, TX. On October 11th this year, I did a little info about them and posted a video about that experience. Basically, just really cool stuff happening.

                  Bottom line is, listen, it's a great pleasure for me to introduce Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents. I've got Aaron Tinjum and Andrew Cote with me, so say "Hi" guys.

Aaron:   Hey Brian, thanks for having us. 

Andrew:                Yes, thank you so much. 

Brian:     Aaron and Andrew. Tell us about, I'm curious right off the bat, where is Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents? Where did the name come from?

Aaron:   We originally formed in Austin, Texas about five years ago. As I was putting together the project with some of the other members, we were doing what every band does, debating what we should call ourselves. 

Brian:     Yup, happens a lot. 

Aaron:   I don't think any of the members wanted full ownership over the song since I was writing over them, they didn't want to be associated with my saddest emotions.

Brian:     Oh, okay. 

Aaron:   We conducted a Facebook poll, and the Tangents was the ultimate winner. I'm not sure that's a solid methodology for selecting a band name, but that's what won and that's what stuck ever since.

Brian:     Got it, so it was a Facebook poll. I love that, all right. Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents. How did you guys come together. 

Aaron:   It's been a gradual process. Originally started with our latest album we released earlier this year, Foreign and Domestic. We had six players on that with Andrew on drums over here. Andrew was found here in D.C. at the Treehouse Lounge.

Brian:     Nice. 

Aaron:   He was playing for us and we were looking for a new drummer, having relocated out here. We had a violinist, Katie Smith. Bass player also moved from Austin, Andrew Berglund. Andrew introduced us to a great pianist, David Chavez, who plays on the album. Our banjo player who didn't move out to D.C., still in Austin, recorded remotely, but actually came up for the album release show.

Andrew:                We're working on getting him moving out here soon. 

Brian:     Very cool. How do you convince people to come to D.C. Is Austin ... I've heard great things about, in D.C., they talk about great things about Austin. What made you move to D.C.?

Aaron:   I'd love to take credit for convincing other people to move to D.C., I don't think I can do that. I think musically, compared to Austin, you have a very supportive community here. Not that you don't have that in Austin, but in Austin, everyone's a musician. 

Brian:     Got it. 

Aaron:   Your audience is full of musicians, whereas here, you might have a real, live listening audience that isn't critiquing your every chord.

Brian:     I guess that's good. It's a good place to move. What about on a personal side, you guys, outside of Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents, what's life like for you guys? What do you do?

Andrew:                I guess I can jump in here. I work professionally as a musician, but, you know, you've experienced Brian, that takes many different forms. I teach at George Mason University. I work in the School of Music there, as well as the Honors college. I teach classes ranging from ear training to Intro to Research Methods, and kind of everything in between.

Brian:     Wow.

Andrew:                Yeah, I do that, then I also work at church, in Fairfax, Virginia. I direct the choirs there. I'm sort of Composer in Residence as well, so I do a lot of arranging and composing and so-

Brian:     Got it.

Andrew:                Yeah. 

Brian:     Drums is your main instrument, but clearly you play a lot more.

Andrew:                Yeah. I'm trained as a percussionist, but in high school, I learned how to play guitar, kind of self taught. Same thing with bass and piano. Just from there, I studied music education and I kind of was on a one way trajectory to do music and had been able to piece together a living doing it.

Brian:     That's amazing. I love the fact that you're doing it. I'm a drummer too, but I got a day job. I can imagine that it's a big leap of faith to get started and probably a challenge and some struggles sometimes, but it has to be pretty rewarding too, and I admire you for that.

Andrew:                Thanks. Supportive wife has helped. 

Brian:     Shout out to the supportive wife.

Andrew:                That's right. She has a day job, so that's also helping.

Brian:     It's a team effort. 

Andrew:                That's right.

Brian:     I got it. I love it. Okay guys. Aaron, you skipped out on that, what about you outside of music? Are you [crosstalk 00:05:14] what else is there to Aaron? 

Aaron:   For my day job, you have to fund your musical and creative endeavors somehow.

Brian:     Got it.

Aaron:   I'm a writer full time working in clean energy. I actually work remotely in D.C.

Brian:     Wow. Where's the headquarters? 

Aaron:   Headquarter house in Ivy City.

Brian:     Ivy City? 

Aaron:   Yeah, it's a great, creative community up there. 

Brian:     It seems like it, absolutely. Where, for those listening who don't know where Ivy City is, which Ivy City are we talking about?

Aaron:   The one in Far Northeast Washington D.C.

Brian:     Got it. You're working remotely from a couple miles away.

Aaron:   Correct. 

Brian:     Okay, I'm clear. Okay. Very cool. Funniest moments from you guys performing, or funniest moment that comes to mind.

Andrew:                Really you kind of glossed over how we met Aaron, which I thought was pretty funny.

Aaron:   I'm sorry.

Andrew:                It's okay. I mean, it's a big introduction right? No. Anyways, I was playing drums that night for another D.C. based artist. A woman by the name of Sally [inaudible 00:06:17]. Her and I met, actually though the church that I work at now. She's an amazing Singer/Songwriter, so definitely, I would recommend if you have some time, listening for her music.

                  Anyways, I was playing for her and Aaron come up to me after a set and said, "Hey, do you want to sit in a play drums with us?" I guess about a week prior to that their other drummer just didn't show up for a gig and that was just kind of the end of the time there.

                  Anyways, long story short, we end up meeting then and it turns out they were heading just the next couple of weeks, to go into the studio to start working on this album, Foreign and Domestic. A couple days later, we were in the basement of my townhouse at that time and we started writing this music.

Brian:     Wow. You literally started playing with them when you were on stage?

Andrew:                Yeah, absolutely. The fee was great on the first gig. 

Brian:     Love it, oh my God. What a crazy story. What about success moments that comes to mind? What's the biggest success moment?

Aaron:   Success-wise, I would say definitely being on your program today.

Brian:     Stop it. Stop it. That's, no.

Aaron:   This is as high as we get.

Brian:     You don't get away with that. Give me another one. I want a story. 

Aaron:   Back in Austin-

Brian:     I appreciate it. 

Aaron:   Like you mentioned, we wound up somewhat hilariously getting our own band holiday playing a wide range of random venues from furniture stores, to dive bars, coffee houses, the airport, used clothing shops.

Brian:     Holy smokes. All right. 

Aaron:   Keeping Austin weird, that's one way they do it. Every month, they give away one or two holidays by official proclamations by the Mayor and City Council. That's definitely been up there. Since we've been playing out in D.C., we've opened up for a few great acts at Jammin Java like Sam Amidon, who just played [inaudible 00:08:07] Festival in [inaudible 00:08:09] Wisconsin.

Brian:     Okay. 

Aaron:   Kawehi who's like a looping legend now on YouTube, just turning up the covers. Then Paul McCartney's son, James, we opened for him back in June.

Brian:     Wow, that's wild. I'm curious about the holiday thing. Do you get put in for that? Does someone nominate you? Do they pick names out of a hat? How does that work. 

Aaron:   They have their own, at least when we did it, there was an application system and we were ultimately chosen. You have to kind of show what you've been doing in the scene. All the places you've played, how often you've played. At that time, we were playing a very long string of gigs. 

Brian:     Right, go for it. I love it. What rules do you always break? 

Andrew:                That's a good question. Aaron, why don't you jump in first? 

Aaron:   I would say, unconsciously, first off, we do mostly soft rock. Soft rock isn't notorious for breaking a whole lot of rules, you know? We like to follow the rules.

But I would say, unconsciously, I'm probably the Jar Jar Binks of guitar rhythm. I'm very not good at that and that drive Andrew crazy. That's definitely one rule I'm breaking all the time.

Brian:     The rhythm rule.

Aaron:   I'm consistent with it.

Brian:     It's good, you're reliable about that, I like it. Okay.

Andrew:                I think, my go to thing is just adding more layers to it. Coming up with different string parts or piano, or adding, you know, they're just different layers always kind of being that ... I don't even know if it's just Devil's Advocate, but just always saying, "Okay, what can we do to shape this a little bit more." Yeah, Aaron beats up on himself a little too much with the rhythm thing. I'm the only one counting I guess.

Aaron:   Andrew's the one, and the rest of the band, all the Tangents make all the songs actually good. I just kind of come up with the idea and they polish and clean it for me.

Brian:     Got it. It's cool, especially when bands come together and they do that together, it's cool to hear. It's a cool effect too to be in those rehearsals I think.

What about one thing you've got in your music collection that would surprise us?

Andrew:                Well, I have sort of a weird, strange instrument collection, but my new favorite toy is an instrument call the Otamatone, which is a Japanese instrument. It's basically, if you were to combine a digitalized slide whistle with just this crazy, animated looking face, that's this weird sound. Long story short, it's a synthesizer toy that's like $20, that I've definitely gotten at least $100 worth of entertainment out of.

Brian:     What about artists or interesting music that you listen to that would surprise us?

Aaron:   I've been doing this whole, you know, the cheesy 30 things to do before you turn 30.

Brian:     Excellent.

Aaron:   I've been doing that more from an album perspective. I have a very eclectic mix going right now, where everything from Sketches of Spain by Miles Davis, to if you've watched Westworld at all, they have a soundtrack with all of the player piano tracks, the cover songs going on in the background, which is pretty cool.

Brian:     Oh yeah.

Aaron:   Other than that, Bruce Springsteen's, Nebraska. Tim by The Replacements. I'm going for a wide range right now.

Brian:     The last question that I love to ask is, what's one piece of advice that you would offer?

Aaron:   Andrew's the professor so I'll let him take this one

Brian:     Profess to us Andrew.

Andrew:                That's another really big, tough question. I guess if, I know this is kind of a cliché, but just taking risks. I think a lot of the real fun that's come out of the recording process, working with Aaron and just really any musical endeavor I've taken, has been the uncertain ones that have gone it. There's never been anything really, that I've been super duper proud of, that came out of, "I'm doing this because I know this is safe."

                  I think it's just a matter of really just taking that sort of risk and seeing where it goes. Failing a ton, more often than not, and then just keep pushing and seeing where that leads. Everything is also connected as well. All the failure is connected to the positive stuff as well.

Brian:     That's true. You got to take those risks. For those folks who are interested in finding out more about you guys, where do they go if they want to follow you? What are the best places to find you guys?

Aaron:   You can find us pretty much everywhere. We've got our website, www.aarontinjum, or aarontinjumandthetangents.com, or on Facebook, Twitter, SoundCloud, Spotify, Itunes, Amazon, YouTube, Tinder.

Brian:     All those places.

Aaron:   Any of those places.

Brian:     Okay, got it. You got anything? I know you got some stuff over there. Andrew you got any places that if they want to follow you specifically?

Andrew:                Yeah, for sure. I'm on Twitter and Facebook as well. I have a website for those of you who are classical saxophone enthusiasts, I have an album coming out in the next couple of days of some of the chamber compositions that I have and that can be found at AndrewCodyMusic.com.

October 11, 2016 - Special Guest: Ménage À Garage

^^Episode Is Live Now - Click Above (might take time to buffer/load, refresh page if issue)^^

National Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcherPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

FROM TODAY'S SHOW

NEWS

  1. DC Artists can submit their projects released 10-01-15 to 9-30-16 for consideration for the Wammies (Washington Area Music Awards).  I'm leaving this link here in case it comes back online, the WAMA email said it should still work, but as of 10-11-16 I tried this link and it's no longer working
    http://www.wamadc.com/wama/wammies/w-productregistry.html
  2. Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents Day is today, Oct 11th.  A DC band now, the band used to be in Austin.  They had their holiday proclaimed by the Mayor in 2012
    See the Video Here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W2F6fKT9Gb8

MUSIC

  1. Tongues - Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents (Folk/Rock)
  2. Die in a Fire - Ménage À Garage (Punk/Pop Punk)
  3. Sweet Dreams - Sara Curtin (Indie/Pop Rock)
  4. Falling in a Dream - The Split Seconds (Punk/Pop Punk)
  5. Alone in the Seas - Calm and Crisis (Indie/Punk Rock)
  6. State Tengo Champions - The Hartford Pussies (Punk/90s Rock)
  7. Better Luck Next Time - Curse Words (Punk/Punk Rock)
  8. Intro/Outro music by Fellowcraft (Hard Rock/Blues)

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


MÉNAGE À GARAGE

VIDEO - BIO - PHOTOS - TRANSCRIPT

BIO

Ménage À Garage DC Music Rocks

Ménage À Garage (MÀG) is an energetic poppy punk trio from Washington, DC. Since forming in 2015, MÀG has been immersed in the growing music scene in DC, performing at many local venues including DC 9 and the Rock & Roll Hotel. MÀG performs all-original music from the trifecta of rock storytelling (teen angst, corrupt politics, and outer space), and have become known for their energetic and heartfelt performance style, affecting melodies, and meticulous attention to song-craft and lyrics. MÀG is Jenny Thomas on bass, Alyson Cina on drums, and John Nolt on lead vocals and guitar.

LINKS:  

 

MENAGE A GARAGE DC MUSIC ROCKS
Ménage À Garage DC Music Rocks

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:  Ménage á Garage and their track, "Die in a Fire." So guys, tell us about that track.

Jenny:  John. What it was with that track, it has a long story, but we'll make it short.

John:  We have another song called "Ugly Duckling," which is kind of about someone who's been bullied. 

John:  During one of our practice sessions, the gang was like ... Well, we had some new chords and we were kind of running through these new chords, and I asked, "what should this song be about," and it kind of turned out that everybody said, "Well, what if we did a response to another song?" It turned out to be "Ugly Duckling," and so this song's lyrics are kind of a response as if we are responding to someone who wrote us a letter about the song "Ugly Duckling."

John:  "Ugly Duckling" being about bullying, this song, these lyrics, to me ... There's always been a little bit of tension in my mind about peoples' tendency to tell folks when they're troubled that it gets better.

Jenny:  It gets better.

John:  Because there are certain people who their outlook on life, they don't believe you, right? You can say, "No, it'll get better, don't worry, kid, it's going to be fine," and that kid's going to say, "You know what, don't tell me that." Adults always say things like that, and there's a certain mindset that responds better if you say, "Well, I don't know if it's going to get better; this is just the way life is. Life doesn't owe you anything. What are you going to do?"

Brian:  I see.

John:  "Are you going to give up? Are you going to turn tail and run? What if it never stops raining? What if it never rains again?" All of this stuff is an unknown, so that's kind of what the song is about. It sounds on its surface like it's very pessimistic and down, but it's really kind of a call to action about, what are you going to do if things don't go your way?

Brian:  I dig that message, and let's get to know you guys. So what I want you to do is, if you would introduce yourselves. I want to find out about who's John and who's Jenny, and then also tell us about Ménage á Garage and where the ... The brief history. You don't have to give me the long ones here, but the brief story about the band.

Jenny:  Oh sure, sure. Well, we met at Flash Band, which is an amazing little organization in D.C. It's a great resource for musicians, and it the theme was trios, so hence Ménage. It has actually no other overtones. It's just about three people.

Brian:  Got it, okay.

Jenny:  But music, we're a trio, a power trio, and both John and I have our long musical histories. I've been in a couple bands, and he's been doing all sorts of really educated musical things.

Brian:  So does this go all the way back? Are we talking like, elementary school, and ...

Jenny:  I think probably so, yeah, for both of us.

Brian:  Back there. 

Jenny:  Lifelong learning.

John:  Oh yeah, yeah. Absolutely.

Brian:  Got it, and at what point did you guys decide that, even as adults, we're going to keep doing this music thing, or has that always been the case? Did you stop and then come back to it?

John:  I never considered ... It never occurred to me that I could stop.

Brian:  Yeah, yeah. I don't believe in, like, "once a musician, always a musician." Sometimes you may have like a dry period, where you're just, whatever, not plugged into whatever you're ...

John:  I could see people stopping and doing other things, and I used to do that, and I've met plenty of people that have done that. It just never occurred to me to do that.

Jenny:  No. Doesn't occur to us.

John:  Nothing wrong with it.

Jenny:  That's why we're middle-aged people who play rock music and just embarrass ourselves publicly, and that's just what we do.

Brian:  It's a calculated embarrassment.

Jenny:  It's a skill. No no no.

Brian:  It's a skill. That's even better.

John:  It's owning our skill.

Jenny:  It's a true talent.

John:  Owning my embarrassment.

Jenny:  You know, yeah. It takes extra-special skill.

Brian:  There it is. So, briefly, then tell ... How did you get into music, way back in the beginning?

Jenny:  Okay. Well, my older brother ... I was always surrounded by music. My older brother listened to a lot of really great albums, and he was kind of into the punk scene in southern California, and so I got to listen to things like Hüsker Dü and all those things like, way back in the day. I've always just been attracted to music, and went to my first concert, Roxy Music, when I was 14, and that was a pretty good start. So both just being a musician, and I always ... Music has been a survival mechanism. I mean, it's like I can't live without it. So there was just no question.

Brian:  Wow. Okay. Committed to it. What about you, John?

John:  Well, my mother started me on piano lessons in second grade, and then she started me on cello lessons in third grade, and then I started myself on drum lessons in fourth grade.

John:  To get back at her for making me play the piano and the cello. I played all three of those things the whole way through high school, and into college where I went to Millersville in Lancaster, Pennsylvania for music education. So that was until I was 21, 22, something like that, and after that, played a lot of weddings, played a lot of string quartets, church cantatas, that sort of things. But I love pop music and taught myself guitar when I was working at a movie theater, running movies, and when you run the movies, you usually have a lot of down time, like 45 minutes while everything's playing.

Brian:  That does make sense.

John:  So I would bring my guitar in and be up in the booth, just playing and writing songs and teaching myself how to do that, which is what I really always wanted to do while I was learning how to play Mozart on the cello.

Brian:  That's amazing. All right. So what do you love and appreciate, I like to ask folks, what do you love and appreciate about the D.C. music scene?

Jenny:  Sure. Well I mean, I don't even know if this is unique to D.C., but it's just been my experience of D.C. which is, there's so many good people in the scene. Maybe we've just been fortunate to plug into various musical communities. I just find people are very welcoming and supportive of each other as musicians, so one of the best things, which is why I love that we're here today; one of the best things is just getting to listen to all of this D.C. music and learning about it, because otherwise, I mean, we're not very ... Or a a show, and the live shows that happen around town, you know we wouldn't know about all this great music.

Brian:  That's true. John, what about you? What do you love about the scene?

John:  Well, there are, like Jenny said, there are a lot of talented, generous people in the scene, such as yourself and your band mates, and some of the folks, well I guess all of the folks that we're going to play today.

Jenny:  No, no just some. We're going to call them out.

John:  Well, there's one ...

Jenny:  Who will remain unnamed.

John:  But that's really what it is. The quality and the level of proficiency of the music in D.C. is very high. Historically, D.C. has a great tradition of a professional level of music, and the even the DIY and amateur scene keeps that level up, which is what I appreciate because I don't consider myself a hobbyist. I mean, I aspire to a professional level of quality, even though it's not how I make my living. I think that's what you have to do if you're a passionate musician, unless you're just going to be at home playing the guitar and playing Jimmy Buffett, which is perfectly fine, and there's nothing wrong with that, but it's not me.

Brian:  Right, and what you say is really true also. I've got to say, in doing this show, I've gotten to hear so many of these really talented people who, they do this on the side, and they're professional caliber. But they do it on the side as their hobby, and they make their living another way, and it's truly incredible to see.

John:  It's an avocation versus a vocation.

Brian:  Exactly. Exactly. Well, very eloquently put. I dig it. Tell me about your best show that you've done here in town. Well, not even in town, just in general. What's the best who you've done? 

Jenny:  Well, I mean, we're having a little debate about this, but ... So John ... There was one particular show at Wonderland Ballroom where we were, just because stuff happens, we were forced to really ...

John:  We had a hard stop.

Jenny:  We had a hard stop. We were the last band, and suddenly there was just no more time left at all, and we had to pretty much figure out how to play our nice, cozy 35-minute set in about 20 minutes.

Brian:  Oh my goodness.

Jenny:  We were just like, you know, jumping on stage, and we just said "Let's do it," and we just throw down ...

John:  [crosstalk 00:08:48] tucks. No pedals, no nothing.

Jenny:  The crowd that was there, they were great. They went crazy. They were bouncing off the walls dancing. They thought it was just amazing. I mean ...

John:  They knocked the monitors over.

Jenny:  Our music is well-suited to having to go really fast anyway, so it worked out okay.

Brian:  This is true. The punk genre, it definitely ... Good upbeat tempos, upbeat energy; I can imagine that was one heck of a show.

Jenny:  Right, right, and I would say we're definitely more in the pop-punk realm, just not to mislead anybody. But punk in spirit, all the way, so you nailed that.

Brian:  Got it. Now what about ... What's the future look like for you guys? Let me just ask it. What's the future look like for you guys?

Jenny:  Long. There are a lot of years.

Brian:  A lot of years, so you're not going anywhere, okay. So is there a goal you're working toward, or just want to keep making music?

Jenny:  Always, yes. That is the point. Oh, and now we've got our trailer guy, right behind us, so we're ... Yeah. He's trying out.

John:  We aspire to play at every venue in D.C.

Jenny:  That's right.

John:  It would be a great achievement. That would be a milestone for us.

Jenny:  Yeah.

John:  We've still got some to tick off that we're working on, but that's what I think the future would hold for us, and more recording. We're kind of thinking about different approaches to recording and how to put out music in 2016, like how does it work today? What's the best way? We've recorded and EP, and we've watched a lot of our friends, including Fellowcraft, release their EPs, and we're trying to learn from that and figure out, what is the modern ...

Jenny:  Exactly.

John:  What is the way for the 90s to do it, you know?

Jenny:  So we do have an EP coming out, and we want to continue to record because we already have a bunch of songs that we are chomping at the bit to like get to the studio, and even if we're just doing one at a time, just getting them out so folks can enjoy them. As for all those venues that we're going to play, venues out there, we're looking at you.

Brian:  Very excited.

Jenny:  Yeah, here we come.

John:  We write a lot, and it will be great to have our songs out there for people who come to the shows to be able to hear in advance and maybe look forward to them, rather than a more traditional approach of recording it and then working on it, and then six months later, you release it, and then you play those songs. We're just thinking about different approaches to that. So I think that's in our future; some experimentation.

Brian:  One of my favorite questions to ask is one piece of advice you would offer to musicians?

John:  Join Flashband.

Jenny:  And be yourself.

Brian:  Best, most succinct answers yet. Join Flashband, and be yourself. What about a special message for your fans?

Jenny:  All of our fans, so wait, how many is that? 

John:  Jenny's fans?

Brian:  All of those fans out there. 

Jenny:  We love you. I think I'm going to try to get this guy, who's drilling the door, to be our fan. We were super excited when actually ... Just so you know, the inner workings of a musician's brain, right, that we were really excited when we met our first fan who we did not know.

Brian:  Ah, yes

Jenny:  They were not someone's friend, or ...

Brian:  It's the transition.

Jenny:  I mean it, ended up it was somebody's friend, but she legitimately said, like, "No no no, I came because of you guys, not just because I know your friend over here. That's just a coincidence." So...

John:  I don't think she's been to a show since that one.

Jenny:  That's true. Oh well, we're working on it.

Brian:  There's been so many others since then.

Jenny:  So we're asking, won't you be our fan? Please?

John:  She just did that to get us to buy her a beer, I think. I'm in a band.

Brian:  There you go.

John:  It worked.

Brian:  Clever. Clever. I dig it guys. For those folks who want to find out more about Ménage á Garage, where do they go? What are the best places to find you?

John:  All the places. 

Jenny:  All the places. You know, Facebook. I know. We know that it's a struggle for people who don't know French that we have all these accents, okay, but it's ...

John:  You don't have to type the accents. You'll get to us.

Jenny:  You don't. It's spelled ... it's not Nicki Minaj spelling; it's men-age a garage. That's like the easiest phonetic spelling I can kind of give over the radio.

John:  If you type that in to any convenient search box, you will probably find us

Jenny:  Just Google.

August 2, 2016 - Special Guest Roxplosion

^^Episode Is Live Now - Click Above (might take time to buffer/load, refresh page if issue)^^

National Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcherPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice


Music From Today's Show

  1. DC Music Rocks Listener's Choice Track of the Week: Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents - Silver in the Foothills  (Rock/Folk Rock)
  2. Feral Conservatives - Round The Corner (Rock/Folk Rock)
  3. Wylder - Swells (Rock/Pop/Indie Folk)
  4. More AM Than FM - Kitchen (Rock/Punk)
  5. Black Dog Prowl - Shame (Rock)
  6. The Jones - The News (Rock)
  7. Black Dog Prowl - Vapor (Rock)
  8. More AM Than FM - Cause For Alarm (Rock/Punk)
  9. The Jones - Down On me (Rock)
  10. The Meer - Sand Machine (Rock/Acoustic Rock) -- Glory In Sound DC Music Blog

Live Music Venue Spotlight: Sehkraft Brewing


Special Guest: Roxplosion

Bio - Photos - Video

Photo Credit: Derek Evry

Photo Credit: Derek Evry

Bio:

An underground legend in the DC music community, Alec Berry, known in the scene simply as Roxplosion, is all over the region taking pictures at the hottest shows and coolest venues.  You've seen his photos featured on many of DC's websites, and many DC area musicians feature his photos as their social media profile photos.  When asked to describe himself, he says:

Photo Credit: Turtle Recall

Photo Credit: Turtle Recall

The details of my life are quite inconsequential, I am a computer nerd who is addicted to live rock and roll. My addiction is fed by my friends, many of whom are musicians, recording engineers, bartenders, bouncers, club owners, promoters, piano tuners, luthers, board jockeys, light jockeys, DJs, photographers, videographers, music teachers, poster artists— and rabid fans. In 2002, I brought a camera to a live show, the remaining details are... sketchy.

Thank you so much, Roxplosion, for joining us on this episode!  We here at DC Music Rocks appreciate the incredible art, talent, and generosity you continue to share with the DC Music Community!  Thanks for doing what you do!

Website: http://www.roxplosion.com/

Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/Roxplosion

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/roxplosion/

Link: Roxplosion Fest

Here are a few other photos he shared:

Photo Credit: Roxplosion

Photo Credit: Roxplosion

photo credit: Roxplosion

photo credit: Roxplosion

Roxplosion in action on left.&nbsp; photo credit: Matt Marinec

Roxplosion in action on left.  photo credit: Matt Marinec


I'm looking for great DC Musicians who have released music!  Know of any?  Send this to them!

http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/submit-music/

July 26, 2016 Show

^^Episode Is Live Now - Click Above (might take time to buffer/load, refresh page if issue)^^

  1. DC Music Rocks Listeners Choice Track of the Week: Albino Rhino - Walk In Squares  (Funk/Blues)
  2. The Jones - Bruises (Rock)
  3. Aaron Tinjum and the Tangents - Silver in the Foothills  (Rock/Folk Rock)
  4. Dan Wolff & The Muddy Crows - Straight Crazy  (Rock/Americana)
  5. Lisa Said - For Today (Rock/Americana)
  6. Don Zientara - The Things You Do (Rock/Americana)
  7. The Meer - Medicine (Rock/Acoustic Rock) -- Glory In Sound DC Music Blog
  8. Amy Wilcox - Summer in Slow Motion (Country)
  9. Black Masala - Too Hot To Wait (Pop/Brassband)
  10. Raheem DeVaughn - I Don't Care (R&B)
  11. Raheem DeVaughn ft R. Kelly (R&B/HipHop)

Cool Venue Spotlight: Acre 121 - Voted best place to have dinner and hear live music in the Washington City Paper's Reader's Poll

I'm looking for great DC Musicians who have released music!  Know of any?  Send them my way or send this to them!

http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/submit-music/