5/22/18 - Special Guest: Dustin, Talent Buyer for Hill Country, BBQ & Music Venue In DC

Thanks to Dustin from Hill Country, the BBQ Restaurant and Live Music Venue in Penn Quarter in Downtown DC, for hanging out with us in the studio this week!  Loved the story about the name!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. ***Void, by Wandering Lies (Rock, Melodic Rock)
  2. Right by Her, FeelFree (Reggae, Alternative Rock)
  3. ***Buddy Love, by Jumpin' Jupiter (Rock, Rockabilly)
  4. ***Drinkin, by The 5:55 (Rock, Indie Rock)
  5. Told You What To Say, by Paperhaus (Indie, Alternative)

***The first time we've played this artist for you on the show, & a new artist profile added to our DC Artist Database!  There's new artists every week!

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-

Email Signup Link
For those who don't already conveniently get all this via email!


ANNOUNCEMENTS

DC Music Rocks Festival at 9:30 News:
We created a Spotify playlist to preview these incredible artists!  It’s a few of our favorite songs by Kid Brother, Pebble To Pearl, Fellowcraft, Allthebestkids, and Black Dog Prowl.  We hope it adds to your day, and gives you an idea of the incredible music and talent you'll get to see at the Festival on Aug 18!
https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/6yfVCMcPNTTe4Q5v9wTR7b?si=CCnbA5wcQeKFHJ7XWIeRMQ

It's also the final days of DC Music Rocks Listener Appreciation Presale Window.  Tickets are public May 24.  It was important to us to make sure you all have first dibs on these.  We hope you’ll pick yours up, mark your calendar, and be there for this epic event on Aug 18!
Details: http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/festival/
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/events/197997380997173/


NEW MUSIC RELEASES

  • Empresarios - Cambumbeo (4 Song Latin EP, RIYL Pitbull)

  • Luke James Shaffer - How Sweet The Sound (Indie Single, RIYL Mumford & Sons)

  • Clutch - Gimme The Keys (Hard Rock Single, RIYL Led Zeppelin

  • Handsome Hound - Mountain on Fire (Folk 10-song LP, RIYL Shovels & Rope)

  • Caz Gardiner - Stop (Pop/Reggae Single, RIYL Sharon Jones)

  • Odetta Hartman - Misery (Indie Single, RIYL Bjork)

  • Ras Slick - Late Night (Reggae Single, RIYL Wayne Wonder)

Our 2018 New Releases by DC Artists’ Spotify Playlist:
https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/7kbMQzbrQPisoJq5A76V3k


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Here’s just a few highlights for the coming week, be sure to check out the calendar for the full list of all the upcoming shows!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

PERSONAL NOTE FROM BRIAN:  I would really love a chance to meet some of you in person!  I'm playing Union Stage with my band, Fellowcraft, on Saturday 5/26, I go on right at 6:15pm. Details are below, it will be an epic rock show, especially if you like Soundgarden, AC/DC, Alice In Chains, The Black Keys, or Foo Fighters.  Hope you’ll come spend some time down at DC’s waterfront! It’s beautiful if you haven’t been!
Facebook Event:  https://www.facebook.com/events/165775254226339/

Fri May 25
Be Steadwell @ 9:30 Club (Pop, RIYL Sade/Joni Mitchell)

Sat May 26  **Brian, the Host of DC Music Rocks will be behind the drums with Fellowcraft for this one!!  Come say hi!**
Black Dog Prowl, Fellowcraft, Stone Driver @ Union Stage *Early Show, doors at 5:30pm* (Hard Rock, RIYL Soundgarden, Alice in Chains, The Black Keys)

Sun May 27
Human Country Jukebox @ Pearl Street Warehouse (Country, RIYL a live country music Jukebox)

Wed May 30
Jackie & The Treehorns & Nah. @ DC9 (Rock/Indie, RIYL Queens of the Stone Age or Courtney Barnett

Thurs May 31
The Coolots @ Union Stage (Rock, RIYL 311)


Patreon

Do you like what we're doing?  Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **Music 4 The Revolution (Abu Jibran)**


We're Looking For Advertisers/Sponsors

We're looking for local businesses to sponsor us!  Know One?  Would you introduce us to them?


Dustin, Talent Buyer for Hill Country

Video - Bio - Links - Transcript

Dustin's Bio:

Dustin Pet

In 2008, Dustin Pet left Maryland to attend Johnson and Wales University Denver campus to study culinary science. While attending college, he worked at Moe’s Original Barbeque Restaurant, Music Venue and Bowling alley as a pitmaster and line cook. During his time at Moe’s, he soon learned he had both a passion for music and food leading him to switch his major to Sports Events and Entertainment Management.  While attending classes, he interned and worked for Denver’s Cervantes’ Masterpiece Ballroom and the world-famous Comedy Works Denver. After graduating from Johnson and Wales University, Dustin moved back to his home state of Maryland and started working for Rams Head Center Stage at Maryland Live! Casino as an entertainment representative. At the same time, he started his first production and entertainment company, where he booked shows with national and local artists in Baltimore venues also working with non-profit organizations and managed artists. From there he became a talent buyer for Gypsy Sally’s DC. Dustin’s motivation is a direct result of his passion for putting on great live music and combining his background in culinary science together with music. If he had one song on repeat while stuck in an elevator he would pick "Drivin' Nails In My Coffin" by Ernest Tubb. Dustin believes that “Great music and delicious food is medicine for the masses”. 

Links:
https://hillcountry.com/dc/
https://www.facebook.com/hillcountrylive/
https://www.instagram.com/hillcountrylive/

 

Dustin Pet
Dustin Pet

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:               On D.C. Music Rocks we're shining a spotlight on the great songs, artists, and incredible people behind the D.C. Region's local music scene. In 2008, Dustin Pet left Maryland to attend Johnson & Wales University, Denver Campus. While attending college, he worked at Moe's Original Bar B Que restaurant, music venue, and bowling alley, as a pit master and a line cook. That's where he learned he had a passion for music and food. After graduating, Dustin moved back home to Maryland and started working at Rams Head Center Stage at Maryland Live Casino as an entertainment representative. At the same time he started his first production in an entertainment company where he booked shows with national and local acts in Baltimore venues. From there, he became the talent buyer for Gypsy Sally's, and how he's at Hill Country. Dustin believes that great must and delicious food is medicine for the masses, which that really speaks to my heart, sir. I love that man. Thanks so much for being here man.

Dustin:             Oh, thank you.

Brian:               This is cool, now, one thing, so right off the bat I want to know about Hill Country. Where's the name come from?

Dustin:             Well it's based off of the Hill Country in Texas, which is the region around the capital, which is Austin, Texas.

Brian:               Got it, and that's call the Hill Country, is the area around Austin?

Dustin:             That area and just generally just all around Austin based in the radius area.

Brian:               I see.

Dustin:             Yeah.

Brian:               That's the Hill Country.

Dustin:             The name, man.

Brian:               God I've always wondered. It's the Hill Country in Texas, around Austin. Now I feel like ... that's a mind blown moment for me. I'm like, wow, I get it now. Cool. Golly. Now talk about your earliest memory with music. Where does this come from, where does this start for you?

Dustin:             Well, you know when I was a kid, my dad took me to see the recreation of the Grateful Dead called The Dead, at Merriweather. I must have been 11 or 12 years old. All I could remember was, "I don't want to be here. Who are these strange people? Get me out of here. When is this show going be over? Why is it lasting four hours long?"

Brian:               Yeah.

Dustin:             I left the experience with my brother being like, "That was actually really fun." I started dancing, you know? I enjoyed it. I always played music as a kid as well.

Brian:               Nice, what did you play?

Dustin:             I started playing the saxophone, and then I ventured into guitar, then I ventured into the bass guitar, a little dobra, now I just strum the guitar.

Brian:               Wait a minute, if they don't know what a dobra is, describe that.

Dustin:             Well, it's a very complicated instrument that you put on your lap, and you use a metal component to it, that's a slide, and you slide, and it's used a lot in bluegrass music.

Brian:               Oh, so this is that it almost looks like a maybe on your lap, but some people have it set up as a table.

Dustin:             Well that's a lap steel.

Brian:               That's a lap steel which is different than a dobra.

Dustin:             Correct.

Brian:               All right, so you're going to have to Google this if you're really interested and get a picture ... that way you can get a picture of what a dobra is. Spell that.

Dustin:             D-O-B-R-A.

Brian:               Dobra, got it.

Brian:               You're from Maryland. Describe where you from in the D.C. region. Talk about that.

Dustin:             I grew up in Columbia. Just a little bit further away from Columbia. Right around Merriweather Post Pavilion.

Brian:               Got it. When you say grew up, that means born and raised, been there all your life until college, when you went to Denver?

Dustin:             Mm-hmm, born and raised until seventeen, and then moved to Colorado for about eight years.

Brian:               Wow, so you were there longer than just college, you stuck around a little bit?

Dustin:             I stuck around, I didn't want to leave.

Brian:               You got all that pit barbecue, and the music.

Dustin:             Oh man I also worked at a comedy club too. So I was just living it up with entertainment, my friends were also working for concert venues, it was just a onslaught of free entertainment. So every night was something.

Brian:               God, I love it. Now talk about you on the personal side. Outside of all this music stuff, what other things are you into?

Dustin:             I'm actually really into going to new nature areas where there's trails. I usually go by myself, I crank some tunes up and I walk and I just discover nature.

Brian:               Wow, that's amazing, and what kind of music are you listening to when you're cranking those tunes?

Dustin:             Oh man, that's a tough question.

Brian:               Yeah?

Dustin:             I gotta be honest, I have a lot of pride in new bookings that I do at Hill Country or whatever it is that I'm booking at the time, and so I start to obsess about some of the artists that I book and I venture really deep into their discography. That's what I'm usually cranking.

Brian:               I see, okay.

Dustin:             I make a little Spotify playlist.

Brian:               All their other stuff that they've got?

Dustin:             Yeah, the stuff that wasn't the million hits song.

Brian:               Right, the one with the fewer plays, one of the B-Side tracks, what they used to call it in the old days. That's amazing. So, funniest moment that comes to mind when you're thinking about your time specifically at Hill Country.

Dustin:             At Hill Country? Something that's really funny is pretty much like a Texas singer-songwriter legend, his name is John D. Graham, he showed up to the gig about fifteen minutes late, but it wasn't really that late, you know, and he was so-

Brian:               Wait, what does that mean? So the gig started at 8:00 and he showed up at 8:15?

Dustin:             He showed up a little bit after the doors, so sound-checking wasn't an option, it was only line-checking.

Brian:               Oh, okay.

Dustin:             Yeah, he was super apologetic about it, I became kinda good friends with this guy and he left me a note on the wall in the greenroom, and he makes children's books on the side, and he drew like a polar-bear-looking bear, and he wrote on there "I never miss a gig unless I'm in the hospital or I'm in jail. Love, pretty much, John D. Graham."

Brian:               So did you find out whether he was in the hospital or in jail?

Dustin:             Oh no, he made it to the gig.

Brian:               Oh this was just straight up canceling?

Dustin:             He just wanted to reiterate that even if he was fifteen minutes late that he apologized, and that if he was ever to miss any gig I ever booked it would be those two reasons.

Brian:               Okay. Got it.

Dustin:             And that he would pin it on the wall so that I would have it later.

Brian:               That way you could always reference it later.

Dustin:             My boss framed it, it's on the wall downstairs in the club level at Hill Country, so you can go up and see it at any time.

Brian:               That's hilarious. Now, you talked about the different things that you do because it's come up in conversation that you do some managing of artists, but then you're booking at Hill Country, so talk about the different aspects of Dustin.

Dustin:             First hand, I'm talent buyer, I'm booking for Hill Country Live, D.C. and Manhattan.

Brian:               Wait, there's more than one location?

Dustin:             There's two locations, friends, so if you're ever in New York City, and you need a place to see either some really awesome live music that could be free, could be ticketed, but for the most part free, come on down.

Brian:               Wow, Hill Country. So it's a basement venue here, in D.C., you walk into Hill Country and go downstairs, is it the same thing in New York?

Dustin:             Same model, but bigger.

Brian:               Bigger?

Dustin:             Yeah.

Brian:               Okay, next time I'm in New York, I'm gonna have to check out Hill Country. So you do booking, I'm sorry I got totally distracted by the fact that there's now two locations, my mind is blown at the moment, so there's some talent buying for there, and then what else?

Dustin:             I'm also managing a couple bands, and I also do some freelance work, I help people out who need guidance, and I sometimes donate my time for the most part, but I'm managing a Brass band out of Brooklyn named High & Mighty Brass Band. I'm managing a bluegrass/newgrass band out of Baltimore named the Dirty Grass Players, FeelFree, which we were just talking about. I also help out an Almond Brothers tribute, called the Almond Others Band.

Brian:               Wow. And when you say managing, if people don't know what that means, what does that actually mean on a day-to-day basis?

Dustin:             It's kind of like you have five full grown babies that you're taking care of.

Brian:               Oh, so it's like being a father? I see.

Dustin:             It's like being a father to a bunch of people who may be older than you, younger than you, all walks of life, and you're controlling a lot of e-mails.

Brian:               So what on Earth made you want to do that? I'm not sure if you don't have a kid already, I'm not sure I would sign up for multiple babies. I don't know, tell me more.

Dustin:             I guess passion, man, I just-

Brian:               You love the music that they're making?

Dustin:             I like the human spirit behind them, and the music they're making, and they push me to do things that I wouldn't do and pull my hair out sometimes, get a phone call at two in the morning, "Hey we're playing a gig in the mud, and I dunno if we're getting paid," you know, bad stuff.

Brian:               So that means you're the guy who, as the manager then ... you are doing the booking, or you're not doing the booking? For the band, or is that something else?

Dustin:             So the Dirty Grass Players, the High & Mighty Brass Band, they both have booking agents currently, national booking agents. FeelFree, they're independent, I help them out a little bit, but I'm teaching them, and then Almond Others is kind of the same thing, they're very local. They're trying to get out a little more, so if you live in a different town and know anybody and love Almond Brothers, figure out a way to get a hold of me.

Brian:               So I'm trying to figure out then is what you're doing for the bands as the manager, then.

Dustin:             Everything from advancing every show that they play to marketing on their Facebook, updating their websites, making sure they're making music videos, discussing strategy about how can we get our name out there further into different markets that we're trying to perform at. It's a endless list of tasks honestly, and I didn't realize it until I got knee deep in it.

Brian:               There's like a constant checklist of things you need, and you mentioned music videos, why are music videos important?

Dustin:             It represents what your band is, and what you're trying to display to the world, and why can people relate to you.

Brian:               Oh, so it's that visual piece? It's not just the music, it's like, oh here's these guys.

Dustin:             Yeah, it's "hey who is this band? FeelFree. What's the next FeelFree music video?" I'm not gonna tell you, but it's gonna happen.

Brian:               Nice. Well I'll make sure we share it whenever that does happen, 'cause I'm excited about it. Their first videos I really enjoyed. I follow them on YouTube too, and I've enjoyed what they've got so far, so that's a sign of things to come, you're teasing me now. I love it, alright. Now, one of my favorite questions that I always have to ask, is that if you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be?

Dustin:             For band?

Brian:               In general, however you wanna answer the question.

Dustin:             Work harder, and then when you think you're tired, work a little harder.

Brian:               Okay, say more, what does that mean exactly, like just do more, or? I feel like that could be spinning your wheels or what?

Dustin:             Put more energy out, man. Put some more energy out into the world, that's what I think. I think a lot of people want to achieve a lot in their life, but they're not putting the energy to do that.

Brian:               I see.

Dustin:             I'm a person who believes in the idea of what you put out is what you get.

Brian:               Got it, alright it's that hustle. Bring on that hustle. Now, one other fun question, then. Talk about your biggest success moment, that comes to your mind in your career talent buyer-wise. What comes to mind when you think about that?

Dustin:             I would actually have to say the time I booked my Colorado legend band. Leftover Salmon at Sally's. Definitely. I remember when I booked that, I literally threw paper up in the air, I was like, "It's happening, Leftover Salmon's coming to town at Gypsy Sally's." It's just an honor to book a band that I've seen at Red Rocks.

Brian:               Nice, that is cool. Was anyone around to see you throw paper? Is this like in the middle of an office with a few other people, or is it in a room by yourself?

Dustin:             There was one other person in the room. The other booker there.

Brian:               So there's more than one?

Dustin:             There is. I think there's more than one now.

Brian:               What's the team like at Hill Country?

Dustin:             I have a boss in New York, his name is Seth Rothschild, he's awesome. He comes to D.C. here, there. I'm gonna go up to New York, for the most part I work with a bunch of restaurant managers, and I'm a talent buyer, so it's a different situation than I thought when I got in there, but I love it and all the people that I work for are some of the nicest people I've ever worked with.

Brian:               That's been the really funny thing- funny's the wrong word, really fun thing that I've discovered working in the local music scene is that there's so many amazing people in the scene. It's one of the reasons I love having you on the show and I always have different people on the show, it's not just artists right? There's so many people behind the music scene, and I love getting to know those people, because they're some of the most amazing, salt of the Earth, nice people. It makes sense that your coworkers at this place are also really awesome people, because you're an awesome person, and we got everybody together, that's just cool to me.

Dustin:             Yeah, it's kinda like the Brady Bunch.

Brian:               It's one big happy family. Yep, there we go, the Brady Bunch, I'm gonna try not to get the song stuck in my- if you're listening, do not get the song stuck in your head. Don't do it. Don't do it. So, one more time, for those folks who wanna follow you and find out what's happening at Hill Country and all that information, where's the best place for them to go find that?

Dustin:             You can either go to the Facebook, which is Hill Country Live, or you can go to www.hillcountry.com/dc, for the D.C. venue, and if you by chance are in New York or have friends, www.hillcountry.com/ny.

Brian:               It's either D.C. or NY, we're talking about D.C. on this one, so hillcountry.com/dc, and you'll check out the work that Dustin's doing, setting up amazing shows. And the type of shows they'll see at Hill Country are?

Dustin:             We go all over the place, Americana, Folk, Honky-Tonk, Bluegrass, Alt. Country. Like I mentioned I had an all Metal tribute to the Bee Gees called Tragedy.

Brian:               So basically, if you ever thought Cowboy boots were cool, everything about Hill Country you're gonna love?

Dustin:             Pretty much, yeah. To a T.

Brian:               That's amazing. I love it.

5/15/18 - Special Guest: Frankie from Girls Rock! DC

Thanks to Frankie V from Girls Rock! DC for hanging out with us in the studio this week!  We love the work they're doing and are happy a portion of the proceeds from this year's 9:30 Club DC Music Rocks Festival is going to support the work they're doing!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. ***Got It All, by King Leisure (Indie, Indie Rock)
  2. ***Send Me A Soul, by The Beirds (Rock, Space Rock)
  3. ***Greens, by Be Steadwell (Pop, Soul)
  4. ***Deleted You, by Be Steadwell (Pop, Soul)
  5. ***Reputation, by Babbling April (Indie, Indie Rock)

***The first time we've played this artist for you on the show, & a new artist profile added to our DC Artist Database!  There's new artists every week!

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-

Email Signup Link
For those who don't already conveniently get all this via email!


ANNOUNCEMENTS

Brian’s Personal Invitation To You:  
Brian’s playing at Union Stage on Saturday 5/26, doors at 5:30pm, Brian goes on with his band Fellowcraft right at 6:30pm.  Show will also feature rock local groups Black Dog Prowl and Stone Driver.  It will be an epic rock show, especially if you like Soundgarden, AC/DC, Alice In Chains, The Black Keys, or Foo Fighters.  Hope you’ll come spend some time down at DC’s waterfront! It’s beautiful if you haven’t been! Facebook Details:  https://www.facebook.com/events/165775254226339/
Ticket Link:  https://www.ticketfly.com/purchase/event/1655009

DC Music Rocks Festival at 9:30
Exclusive listener appreciation presale is now live!  This link isn’t public yet, it’s your chance to get your tickets before they go on sale for real.  It was important to us to share this opportunity with you all, we’ve known some of you for a while, and a few of you from the very beginning, so we wanted to make sure you all have first dibs.  We hope you’ll pick yours up and mark your calendar now, this event will be epic!
Details: http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/festival/
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/events/197997380997173/
Ticket Link:  https://www.ticketfly.com/purchase/event/1693457


NEW MUSIC RELEASES

Be Steadwell - Queer Love Songs (10 Song Pop Album, RIYL Sade or Joni Mitchell)

Our 2018 New Releases by DC Artists’ Spotify Playlist:
https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/7kbMQzbrQPisoJq5A76V3k


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Here’s just a few highlights for the coming week, be sure to check out the calendar for the full list of all the upcoming shows!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Fri May 18
Handsome Hound, Dupont Brass & Lauren Calve @ Black Cat (Folk/Horns, RIYL Johnny Cash & June Carter/The Roots/Pattie Griffin)

Sat May 19
Chuck Brown Band & Three Man Soul Machine @ Pearl Street Warehouse (Funk/Go-go, RIYL EU/Willis ‘Gator’ Jackson)

Sun May 20
Justin Trawick @ Bourbon & Bluegrass at Lincoln Cottage (RIYL Bluegrass)


Patreon

Do you like what we're doing?  Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **Music 4 The Revolution (Abu Jibran)**


We're Looking For Advertisers/Sponsors

We're looking for local businesses to sponsor us!  Know One?  Would you introduce us to them?


Girls Rock! DC

Video - Bio - Links - Transcript

Girls Rock! DC's Bio:

GR!DC Logo.png
Girls Rock! DC

With a base in music education, Girls Rock! DC aims to create a supportive, inclusive, and creative space for girls, non-binary, and trans youth of varying racial, ethnic, religious, and socioeconomic backgrounds; abilities; identities; and experiences to develop their self-confidence, build community, stand up, and rock out!

Following in the footsteps of girls rock camps across the United States, Girls Rock! DC was founded in October 2007 by an all-volunteer collective of DC metro area musicians, teachers, artists and community organizers. We build upon our diverse experiences and musical backgrounds, connections to local youth, and approaches to grassroots organizing to create a week-long day camp, for Washington, D.C. area girls ages 8-18, as well as an after school program. 

During the week, campers receive small-group instruction on electric guitar, bass, drums, keyboards, turntables, digital music, or vocals; form bands, and collaborate to write an original song or DJ set, which they perform at a showcase at the end of the week. Campers also learn about the history of women in rock, gender and cultural identity, ways to dismantle systems of oppression, band merchandise and promotion, conflict resolution and other skills young folks need to take over the world of music! The 2018 Summer Camp will take place at E.L. Haynes July 9-13, and culminate with our big showcase Saturday, July 14 at the 9:30 Club

Links:

WEBSITE www.girlsrockdc.org

FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/GirlsRockDC

INSTAGRAM https://www.instagram.com/girlsrockdc

 

Girls Rock! DC
Girls Rock! DC

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:   With me on the show today is Frankie from Girls Rock! DC. Say hi, Frankie.

Frankie V:   Hi. Thanks so much for having me.

Brian:   Yeah, thanks for being here. Now, for those ... If they don't know, what ... I tell you what. You know, I got this little intro. How about we just do this the right way? So, I'm going to introduce you, and then I'm going to have you tell us all about you. So, on DCMusicRocks.com, we are shining a spotlight on the great songs, artists, and incredible people behind the DC region's local music scene. With a base in music education, Girls Rock! DC aims to create a supportive, inclusive, and creative space for girls, non-binary, and trans youth of varying racial, ethnic, religious, and socioeconomic status to develop their self-confidence, build community, stand up, and rock out. If you caught all that, that was a lot. But they are very inclusive of all the backgrounds, abilities, identities, and experiences. So, it's a very welcoming environment that they've created.

    Following in the footsteps of Girls Rock! camps across the U.S., Girls Rock! DC was founded in October of 2007 by an all-volunteer collective of DC metro area musicians, teachers, artists, and community organizers. So, they create a week-long day camp for Washington DC area girls age 8 to 18, as well as they have an after school program. So, the 2018 summer camp will take place July 9th to 13th and will culminate with a big showcase Saturday, July 14th, at the 9:30 Club.

     So basically, that gives you a little piece of it, but now, Frankie, now you can tell us all about it. Thanks for being here. This is cool. How did you get involved in Girls Rock! DC?

Frankie V:   Well, I moved to DC about, I don't know, four years ago. I'm a Brooklyn-based musician by heart. So, when I moved to DC, it was winter, as winters can be pretty rough here, and I was just looking for some like-minded people that I could talk to, that we were on the same kind of wavelength, we believed in the same kind of things, and my bass player back home in Brooklyn said, "You know what? My friend started this organization a couple years back called Girls Rock! DC. Maybe check it out."

 I went on the website. I reached out. I shot an email, and I got an email back, and they said, "Hey, we are usually a summer camp, but right now, we're doing an after school program for the first time." I came down, I checked it out, and I've been hooked ever since.

Brian:   Nice. What did you do? So, you checked it out, and what did you discover when you checked it out?

Frankie V:   Oh my God. It was amazing. The thing that really, really caught me and kind of latched me in was the sense of community that they had. The amount of resources and just institutional knowledge that everybody was sharing from ... I needed a place to live. Somebody knew of an organization that could help me find a place to live. I needed a band. I was looking for a band when I came here. You know, traveling to New York was very far. They helped me with that. The community aspect was really, really huge. Then to be able to work with youth, that was just something I never thought I would ever do, but seeing those kids' faces and seeing the change in them really, really hooked me.

Brian:   Wow. So now, expand on the two ... So, there seems to be two things here. There's a summer camp, and there's an after school program. So, talk about those.

Frankie V:   Yeah. So, Girls Rock! started as a summer camp. One singular person decided to do a thing in their bedroom, and it blew up to this ... Now we have about 60 campers per summer. It's a five-day camp. Kids come in. First day of camp, they don't know each other. Sometimes they do, sometimes they don't. Often they don't even know how to play an instrument. They've never seen a drum set or a guitar. We teach them the basics of the instrument. We teach them how to create their own songs. At the end of the week, they play a showcase at the 9:30 Club.

 In between that learning music and getting to know each other, we also teach them some social justice stuff, some racial equality things, how to just be a good friend and a good human all around. So, it's a killer camp.

Brian:   Yeah. And more on that ... Say a little more on that too. So, when you're teaching them, does that mean there's classroom time where you've got a slideshow or something, or you're reading, or what is that like?

Frankie V:   Yeah. So, first and foremost, we always lead by example. Our band instructors, and coaches, and volunteers really represent the community that we're serving. We have folks from all walks of life, all socioeconomic backgrounds, and it really mirrors the kids that we're serving. In between, they'll have ... Let's say, they'll do their instrument instruction during the day. So, they go to guitar instruction, and then have lunch, and then at the end of the day, they'll go to a workshop catered to their age group on different topics from healthy relationships all the way to how to be a great showman.

Brian:   Wow. How did it start? Because it seems like it didn't start as a five-day camp and a 9:30 Club show. It had to have ... So, how did it start, and how did it evolve?

Frankie V:   It started with an idea of just, how to bring this kind of thing that some of us have never had in our youth, how do we bring this to kids? They worked out eventually how to do a summer camp. It started out as just a five-day camp with about 20 kids. They did, I think the first showcase, you know, through DC networks, and the organization was founded with DC musicians, and just networking. 9:30 Club has always actually given us the space. So, it's been 11 years now.

Brian:   That's amazing. I mean, I definitely ... Now I'm sitting here, and I'm thinking, all right, so what makes this a little special compared to another summer camp that parents could send their kids to? It's obviously, playing the 9:30 Club would be a big one. That's a huge, "Wow, that's cool." So, there's that-

Frankie V:   My band would never play there.

Brian:   Right? I was going to say, there's a lot of bands that work a long time to play that stage, and you get to do it as a kid. That's awesome.

Frankie V:   It's pretty cool.

Brian:   So, there's that. But talk about what else is special compared to other summer camps?

Frankie V:   I think what's really special is the kids really learn how to be good citizens in their communities. They learn how to ... what's really necessary to build a good foundation within their communities. They build amazing relationships with each other. Maybe a kid from, you know, Northwest would never get to meet a kid from Southeast, but here, they do. It's really the great equalizer. Music is always the best thing that just unites everybody.

Brian:   Absolutely. So, they're learning instruments, and social aspects, God, that is so cool.

Frankie V:   Yeah.

Brian:   Now, the story behind the name, Girls Rock! DC. Where does that come from?

Frankie V:   Well, Girls Rock! started actually as a movement that came out of the Riot grrrl movement in the early 2000s. It started in the West Coast.

Brian:   What's the Riot grrrl movement? Say more on that.

Frankie V:   Ah, so the Riot grrrl ... Yeah. So, Riot grrrl movement kind of ... The short, short story of is a second-wave feminist movement that was really based in music. A lot of folks, you know ... Bikini Kill is one of the more famous of the bands and really was the front runner of the whole movement. Other bands like Huggy Bear, and different bands from DC, and Portland, Seattle, really noticed, I mean, most of the music that's ... I mean, still to this day, most of the music, most of the things you see in your everyday life are very male-dominated, especially white-male-dominated. So, these women said, "Enough is enough. We're creating spaces for women like us," and really pulling women to the front of these male-dominated aspects.

Brian:   Got it. So, Riot grrrl was really just about, "Down with the patriarchy," or like, "Let's empower the women in this."

Frankie V:   Yeah. Equality and bringing people on the same level. [crosstalk 00:08:23].

Brian:   Got it. And so then from that, Girls Rock!, it's always been a camp?

Frankie V:   Yeah. So, those folks said, "Hey, we want to give back to our community because that's the most important thing. We need to lay the groundwork for the future, and that is within our youth." So, they created a camp solely for girls that was based in music. That's always been the kind of thing. Then by way of mouth, you know, bands touring with each other and saying, "Hey, you know, my friend started this thing. We call it Girls Rock! wherever. Girls Rock! Seattle, Girls Rock! Oregon." Then folks in DC were like, "Hey, that's a really great idea. I want to do that in my community, in New York." Now, it's a worldwide organization.

Brian:   That's amazing. So, all over the world, girls are going to camp, they're learning about instruments, and social justice, and all that stuff, and then they're playing shows.

Frankie V:   Absolutely.

Brian:   Wow. So, it's the same model, all the cities. So, if somebody listening has friends in another city, they might have a Girls Rock! camp, and it's same idea where they're going to learn how to play an instrument and then play a show-

Frankie V:   Absolutely.

Brian:   ... and over the course of a week. I love that play the show part too because that's ... You know, learning an instrument is fun, but then actually playing it in front of people is ... For some people, that's the hardest part, and for other people, that's the fun part. So, it's great that you get to do that too.

Frankie V:   Yeah, it really shows ... The kids really get, you know, "Here's something I'm deathly afraid of, and I can't do. There's no way I can possibly write a song by myself. I'm only eight. And I definitely can't play in front of a whole bunch of people." Then we just ensure them to trust the process, and it just happens, and it's magical. Then they're like, "Well, I can do anything, and I want to do this for the rest of my life." That's really great.

Brian:   Nice. That's amazing. Have you been around long enough to see those girls go on and do it for the rest of their life, or what have you seen?

Frankie V:   Oh my gosh. So, I also run the after school program. It's called GR!ASP.

Brian:   Yeah, talked about that. I got so excited about the camp, we forgot to talk about the program.

Frankie V:   I know, it's so exciting.

Brian:   Talk about after school, yes.

Frankie V:   So, during the after school program, where the summer camp is a five-day, week-long summer camp, immersing kind of situation, the after school program is an 8 to 12 week, one day a week, after school situation at a couple local schools in DC, Southeast, Northwest, all over. This one kid was so amazing. She was about 11 years old at the time, was playing keyboard. Some of her band mates weren't as outgoing as they could have been, let's say. She was also extremely nervous. So, this band was kind of the more introverts. This kid went on to actually lead her school play. They did the Lion King, and her stagefright from the show that we played was right out the window. She went on to play the Ellen Show. They went all over.

Brian:   Holy smokes.

Frankie V:   Yeah, incredible.

Brian:   God, that's so ... And how long ago was it? Was this recently, or was this ... When was that?

Frankie V:   That was about two years ago.

Brian:   Wow. That is so cool.

Frankie V:   It's great.

Brian:   I love it. Now, you mentioned you play bass. Talk about music for you.

Frankie V:   Oh gosh. So, I grew up playing violin when I was, like, four. That's kind of how I started. Music was always in my family.

Brian:   Did you want to play violin, or was it one of those, your parents said, "I want you to play violin"?

Frankie V:   My parents made me.

Brian:   Okay. Oh, God, mine too. Mine said piano. "Brian, you got to play piano." I'm a freakin' drummer. I don't want to play piano, come on. Yeah, I'm with you.

Frankie V:   Yeah, right? So, my parents, you know, they put me into violin. My older sister played piano. Meanwhile, we had a saxophone in the house. We had actually two saxophones, a piano, a whole bunch of instruments. Grew up in the church where music was a really big part of my upbringing, and went on to start playing trumpet and brass instruments once I got into high school. Always just kind of sang. I sang in a ska band, you know, like you do in the '90s. Then I just decided, you know, these bands that are really influential in my life, I want to be just like them, at the ripe old age of 18. I didn't really have people telling me that I could do anything other than play violin and things like that. My dad even said, when I told him that I wanted to be a musician, he was like, "Well, you and 40,000 other people, so you should probably get a real job."

Brian:   And 40,000 is an understatement actually. There's so many hundred thousands more, yeah.

Frankie V:   Absolutely. And especially for a girl. There's no way I can do that. I should probably, I don't know, do anything else.

Brian:   Which is a shame. I'm glad you're not sending that message.

Frankie V:   Yeah, I'm kind of rebellious, so ... In case you haven't noticed.

Brian:   Dad, we still love you, but-

Frankie V:   I still love you, Dad.

Brian:   ... no, I'm still doing music.

Frankie V:   But no. Yeah. So, I taught myself how to play guitar, and I just really listened to bands like the Breeders, and bands like Bikini Kill, and all these other bands, and I just really try to do that. I really, really wish I had an organization like Girls Rock! when I was a kid to show me that I could actually do what I wanted to do, however I wanted to do it.

Brian:   Yeah. It's great that you kind of have taken that ... There wasn't that, and now you found it, and you're helping ... What's your role with Girls Rock!? How would you describe it?

Frankie V:   Oof, how many hats? So, Girls Rock! ... So many hats. My head is very big. So, the main thing I do is I'm the GR!ASP Coordinator, so it's the Girls Rock! After School Program Coordinator.

Brian:   Got it, GR!ASP. I get it now. Okay.

Frankie V:   Yeah. That's my main role. During the summer, I'm now part of the camper committee team. So, right now, camp is coming up July 9th. We actually have our applications out right now, and they close July 1st. So, right now it's just reading all the submissions. The kids get to fill out the application and also submit an art project, their music, song if they want, or a poem, and I get to read through all those wonderful things, and then send out all the acceptance letters.

Brian:   That's cool. While we're on the topic then, if people have kids or girls that they know that are age 8 to 18, we said, if they have girls that they know that would like to be a part of that, how do they submit that application, or to do that?

Frankie V:   Yeah. So, we accept kids from anywhere in the DMV area. We've actually had a couple campers who are visiting from Jamaica, visiting their family, so they have actually attending our camps as well, which was really cool. So, they can go to GirlsRockDC.org, and it'll send you to a link that has our camper application. We accept any youth that are female-identified, trans-identified, gender nonconforming. Money is no issue. We offer lots of scholarships. Last year, I think we had about 40% of our campers out of 60 were free tuition. We just fundraise like crazy. So, if you also want to donate, go to Girls Rock! ...

Brian:   That's amazing. Yeah, right? The donation. And actually, while we're talking about donations, there's another thing you can do because I've talked about the DC Music Rocks festival. A portion of the proceeds are going to Girls Rock! DC.

Frankie V:   Woo-hoo!

Brian:   We're supporting this too. So, you can come to that, and a portion of that will support them, and we'll be taking donations that night for sure. So, there's lots of ways to give to Girls Rock!, and I love that we get to be involved with you guys too and get to help support this cause because this is really cool.

Frankie V:   Yeah.

Brian:   So, now that's the applications. Now, two questions that I love to ask. One is, talk about you on the personal side, now outside of Girls Rock! DC, like your personal life. What are your hobbies? Are there certain shows you like to ... What's life outside of Girl Rock! for you?

Frankie V:   Oh my. Life outside of ... Is there life outside of Girls Rock!?

Brian:   Of course, there has to be something.

Frankie V:   There's got to be, right?

Brian:   You got to share something.

Frankie V:   Mostly, I'm a really avid outdoorsy person. I love camping, things like that. I love traveling. That's kind of my big thing. I just came back from Miami a couple days ago. That was pretty fun. I've never been to Miami. So, I really like stuff like that. I love teaching workshops. I never thought it, but I guess I'm just an educator by soul. I mostly do workshops that are gender-inclusivity workshops and things like that. Just going to lots of shows. The DC music scene is so amazing, and there's so much really good underground bands that you would never maybe run into, and then you go to a house show, or you go to a party, and boom, there's a band, and they're fantastic.

Brian:   Absolutely. So much of that. I mean, we share at DCMusicRocks.com ... The local music calendar that we have is all local shows.

Frankie V:   That's so great.

Brian:   But go to these local shows, and you go to places you didn't know had music, and then you'll see bands you didn't know that are awesome, and that's a lot of ... I mean, it's what I've discovered. It's what you've discovered. It's such a cool thing. I love it.  Now, my other favorite question. If you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be?

Frankie V:   Oh my gosh. One piece of advice. Definitely trust yourself and organize. You know, if you don't like something, or if you think the problems of the world, let's say, are too big, and you can't do anything about it, definitely look to your neighbor. I'm sure they're feeling the same thing, and organize, and get things done.

Brian:   Nice. Is that something that you've experienced personally? Say more about where that comes from for you.

Frankie V:   Yeah. I try to do that in my everyday life. Back in Brooklyn, I was part of a ... You know, being a woman-fronted or female-dominated band back then, it was really hard for us to get shows. People wouldn't even talk to me, even though I was the singer, and one of the two guitar ... We were two guitars and a drummer. People wouldn't talk to me. They would go right up to my male counterpart, and be like, "Oh my God. You guys are so good. So, you write all the music, right? And she just kind of sings, huh?" And it was really devastating. I was just like, "Come on. I'm doing all this work here," you know? Got together with some friends who were also facing a similar kind of thing, and just said, "We need to create shows that are for us, and if other people want to come, cool. We welcome everybody. But we're not getting on any bills." So, really just kind of getting out there and doing what you have to do to get yourself out there, you know?

Brian:   Absolutely. Take it on. I love that. What a cool message. Now, one more time for those folks who want to find out more about Girls Rock! DC and all the things going on with you guys, where do they go?

Frankie V:   Yeah. So, to find out more about our after school program, our adult rock camp, or our summer camp, you can-

Brian:   There's an adult camp too?

Frankie V:   I know.

Brian:   So cool.

Frankie V:   Forgot to mention that.

Brian:   Okay. Is that one also a 9:30 Club show?

Frankie V:   No, so that one we do at, like, the Black Cat.

Brian:   Okay, I got you.

Frankie V:   Yeah, we always partner with other-

Brian:   There's still going to be a show at the end.

Frankie V:   Totally.

Brian:   It's a week-long music education, and then a show. That's so cool.

Frankie V:   Yeah, so that one's actually just a weekend.

Brian:   Oh, a weekend? That's even better. Dang, okay.

Frankie V:   So, 19 to 127, if you want to learn an instrument or DJ-

Brian:   Ages, ages 19?

Frankie V:   Yes.

Brian:   Yeah, okay. Gotcha.

Frankie V:   If you want to learn an instrument or learn how to be a DJ, we have an awesome DJ program, it's a weekend long, usually around Labor Day kind of thing. The show is usually on the Monday.

Brian:   Got it. There it is.

Frankie V:   So, GirlsRockDC.org.

Brian:   GirlsRockDC.org. GirlsRockDC.org.

Frankie V:   GirlsRockDC ...

5/8/18 - Special Guest: Curtis B of DC Reggae

Thanks to Curtis Bergesen of DC Reggae for hanging out with us in the studio this week!  We discovered he reports on all the reggae AND makes collages! #artsyguy  :-)

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. ***Low Spirit, by Distant Creatures (Indie, Dream Pop)
  2. Something, by Yellow Dubmarine (Reggae, Rock & Roll)
  3. Speak the Fire, by Christos DC [Ft. Zafayah & The Skankin' Monks] (Reggae, R&B)
  4. ***One Thirsty, by Synthador (Techno, Electronic)
  5. Drop Your Guns, by Thievery Corporation (World, Reggae)

***The first time we've played this artist for you on the show, & a new artist profile added to our DC Artist Database!  There's new artists every week!

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


ANNOUNCEMENTS

ANNOUNCING The annual DC Music Rocks Festival at 9:30 Club!
August 18, doors at 7pm, All ages welcome.   

This is our signature event.  We gather 5 of DC’s talented local bands for a celebration of local music at one of the nation’s top venues.  We’re also partnering with Girls Rock!DC this year, and a portion of the proceeds from the event will go to support their work in educating and empowering young women through music and performance.  

With this ticket link, you have exclusive presale access right now before the general public, which will be on 5/24.

Details: http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/festival/
Facebook:  https://www.facebook.com/events/197997380997173/
Ticket Link:  https://www.ticketfly.com/purchase/event/1693457


NEW MUSIC RELEASES

Our 2018 New Releases by DC Artists’ Spotify Playlist:
https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/7kbMQzbrQPisoJq5A76V3k


NEW VIDEOS

Our ‘DC Artists Official Music Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70kU0_uB-sdviWajkbzi2Akr


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Here’s just a few highlights for the coming week, be sure to check out the calendar for the full list of all the upcoming shows!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Fri May 11
--Bumper Jacksons & Elena & Los Fulanos @ The Hamilton for White Horse Release Party (Country, Latin; RIYL Nathaniel Rateliff, Shakira)
--Bottled Up @ DC9 Nightclub (Punk, RIYL B-52s)

Sat May 12
--Funk Parade & Takoma Porch Festival
Check our calendar for details on where local artists will be playing, RIYL Festivals and Music Events, both of these will be fun.    
-https://www.funkparade.com/2018-music-lineup/
-https://www.takomaporch.net/

Mon May 14
--Oh He Dead @ Rock & Roll Hotel (Indie, RIYL Alabama Shakes)

Wed May 16
--Duskwhales @ Songbyrd Music House (Indie, RIYL The Beatles)

Thu May 17
--Fuzzqueen @ Gypsy Sally’s (Rock, RIYL PJ Harvey)
--The Radiographers @ DC9 (Rock, RIYL The Strokes)
--Caz Gardiner @ Songbyrd Music House (Pop, RIYL Hollie Cooke)


Patreon

Do you like what we're doing?  Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **Music 4 The Revolution (Abu Jibran)**


We're Looking For Sponsors

We're looking for local businesses to sponsor us!  Know One?  Would you introduce us to them?



DC Reggae

Video - Bio - Links - Transcript

DC Reggae's Bio:

DC Reggae_Curtis Bergesen_hirshhorn.jpeg

Curtis Bergesen aka DC Reggae was born in Washington, DC, and grew up in Bethesda, MD. He is a collage artist, publicist, drummer, vegetarian, and man of many words. While attending the University of Delaware he got involved with radio, and created and hosted the show Mixed Vegetables. He played a wide variety of musical genres throughout his 100+ radio shows, including underground and independent artists. Curtis then started booking and promoting concerts; one of the first artists that he worked with was the reggae band Giant Panda Guerilla Dub Squad (GPGDS). In 2007, Curtis moved to Brooklyn, NY, and founded Herbivore Publicity. He went on to work with Rootfire and Ineffable Music Group, handling publicity and social media for various bands, venues, and festivals, including GPGDS, The Movement, The Green, and John Brown's Body.

In 2009 Curtis created DC Reggae, to spread the word about upcoming reggae concerts in the DMV. DC Reggae shares information about international, national, and local acts, through their social media networks @dcreggae, and mailing list. Curtis' passion for the arts extends beyond music; he creates handmade collages under the alias Collage The World.

Links:

Facebook https://facebook.com/dcreggae
Instagram https://instagram.com/dcreggae
Twitter https://twitter.com/dcreggae

Mailing List http://smarturl.it/dcreggaelist
Collage The World: https://instagram.com/collagetheworld
Herbivore Publicity: https://facebook.com/herbivorepr

 

DC Reggae_Curtis Bergesen_potomac river.jpg
DC Reggae_Curtis Bergesen_rootfire.JPG

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:   On DC music rocks we're shinning a spotlight on the great songs, artists, and incredible people behind the DC regions music scene and Curtis Bergesen, aka DC Reggae, was born in Washington and grew up in Bethesda, Maryland. He's a collage artist, a publicist, drummer, vegetarian, and a man of many words as we're finding out now. While attending the University of Delaware he got involved with radio and created and hosted a show called Mixed Vegetables while he was there and he played a wide variety of musical genres through his 100 plus radio shows including underground and independent artists. So Curtis then started booking and promoting concerts and one of the first artists that he ever worked with was Giant Panda Gorilla Dub Squad which he has now shared with you by name multiple times so clearly we know there's love there. And in 2009 Curtis created DC Reggae which is to spread the word about Reggae concerts coming in the DMV.

    So DC Reggae's whole purpose is they share information about all of the Reggae music whether it's international, national, local through their social media networks and their mailing lists and Curtis' passion for the arts extends beyond music. He also makes handmade collages under the alias Collage The World so he's got visual art and musical art and honestly I've been following you since I ran into you at, I think it was, we were at Gypsy Sally's when Giant Panda Dub Squad was there. Imagine that, I met you at a Giant Panda show.

Curtis B:   Me and [crosstalk 00:01:23].

Brian:   Sensing a theme.

Curtis B:   Yes we met at Giant Panda Gorilla Dub Squad in February we were introduced by the infamous, too tough, Andy [Serdi 00:01:30]. Hi Andy. Great person in the DC music scene.

Brian:   Yeah he's the guy from Fort Knox recordings we had him on the show a couple of times. He's heavily involved in the scene.

Curtis B:   Serious connector, good human.

Brian:   But it's, I've been a fan of yours and the work you're doing ever since so thanks for being here man.

Curtis B:   Thank you so much.

Brian:   How did you get into Reggae?

Curtis B:   Let me just say I totally forgot I sent you this bio and it's incredible how well you seemed to know me Brian. In fact I was telling you some of this varying information before this episode this show. I was trying to tell you about this stuff and I'm like, "Oh the bio that I wrote and sent to them. Whoops." So how did I get-

Brian:   Well we all ready know that stuff so now tell us more stuff man.

Curtis B:   Yes so basically I've worked in the music business for over a decade specifically with mostly nationally touring Reggae bands, none of whom are actually from the DC area. And as time went on I said, "Well I'm from the DC area I may as well start a Twitter @DC Reggae to tweet about shows that are coming up in DMV." And as time went on I then made DC Reggae on Facebook and then an Instagram profile and around December time I thought, "Man it's really time to make a mailing list and start sending out a monthly newsletter with a concert calendar ticket giveaways and other fun things. Information about Reggae music et cetera and so that's basically where we're at. I am taking a little bit more of an active role DC Reggae rather than passively, occasionally posting about upcoming shows.

     I'm trying to take it a little bit more seriously and do a more sort of across the board comprehensive job of promoting and, again, anyone who's out there give me a shout on socials or whatever. If you have a show coming up or you're excited about a show coming up that has anything to do with Reggae music in Washington D.C. in the surrounding areas please get in touch 'cause I'd love to spread the word about your show. And as we all know from DC Music Rocks it's all about connecting with people and spreading the word, I think more importantly than ever, verbal communication, text messages to your friends about cool shows or cool things going on it's not hard to stand out and make a little bit of a difference with some extra promotion outside of just sending an invite to a Facebook event or hoping that someone likes this Instagram page your friend runs that you mentioned to them one time.

Brian:   I must say you got that speil down. Clearly you've been doing this for a little while. You got, you're all ready arming them with don't, you know, send a text, not a Facebook invite, like boy you clearly. I love it man. You're definitely involved with this thing but it's also everything that you're saying is true which is that the little bit of personal touch and clearly you put a lot of personal touch into what you do too with creating this DC Reggae thing. So I love that man. What part of the city is home for you?

Curtis B:   So I grew up in Bethesda. I was born at Columbia Hospital for Women thanks to my mom for having me and giving birth to me. She's a special lady and I also learned, in preparing for this interview that Duke Ellington and Al Gore were also born at this hospital which is now been turned to condominiums, but anyway, yes I-

Brian:   That was the most random story and I love it. Like we went from you being born, thanks mom, Al Gore, Duke Ellington, condos. I don't know if we could've done it any better man.

Curtis B:   I'd like to thank my ... I'd like to thank my sponsor Wikipedia on that last information blast.

Brian:   Oh God I love it. Thank you Wikipedia. All right so ...

Curtis B:   I just moved in to a new apartment in, I think the neighborhoods called Cathedral Commons, but I don't know if that's-

Brian:   Up near the National Cathedral?

Curtis B:   It's near the National Cathedral-

Brian:   Nice.

Curtis B:   There's a lot a trees and forests nearby which is super crucial when you look out of a apartment window all day if you do that sort of thing. My girlfriend Crystal and I just moved in the past couple of days. It's been stressful as anybody who's ever moved [crosstalk 00:05:05]-

Brian:   Oh wow one of those. Congratulations on the new place man.

Curtis B:   Thank you so much.

Brian:   That's exciting.

Curtis B:   And also Crystal was a good sounding board for me yesterday prepping for this interview which I've been extremely nervous about and thanks to whoever's listening out there and sticking with me. I appreciate you listening because compared to Brian-

Brian:   Curtis you're doing great man.

Curtis B:   Compared to Brian-

Brian:   Just stop it. Just stop it you're doing great man. Don't do it. So what's the, tell us about your earliest memory with music man?

Curtis B:   So my earliest memory with music it's hard to say definitively but I remember my dad quizzing me about what song was on the radio. He'd say, "Okay who is this?" And I would say, "I have no idea." It was so hard to tell it was just like who knows. Led Zeppelin, The Police, I mean Doobie Brothers it could have been anyone and I got frustrated with him for it, but at some point this is the magic of communication and I don't know, potentially good parenting or music sharing. At some point I started remembering who it was and I could hear the song and I would say, "Oh this is so and so." Now I don't know how old I was or how long this took me, side note, again another girlfriend shout out, I now do this to my girlfriend Crystal. I say, "Oh what song is this?" And she's-

Brian:   Oh God. It's your parents taught you and now you're doing it there too. That's funny.

Curtis B:   She says, "I have no idea. I'm only interested in what Beyonce is doing with ..." Yeah. Her next world tour which I am also interested in. Beyonce is absolutely incredible.

Brian:   That's like the bae squad. She's one of the baes. Yeah.

Curtis B:   Yeah so early music experience I credit to my dad quizzing me on what song we were listening to and-

Brian:   And was that in the car or was that at home? Where was that normally?

Curtis B:   I would say probably the car. It could have been at home, again, I'm in my late 90's now so it's hard to say exactly what decade it was but-

Brian:   We did, we did see you if you look at the pictures on social media. We got the ... There's definitely long hair version of Curtis and a short hair version of Curtis and various lengths of beard Curtis. So it's been a lot of evolutions over a year. 90 plus years you're just talking about now [inaudible 00:07:00] that's, I like it.

Curtis B:   My hair farming came to an end after three plus years in this past fall and I've had a lot of work done. So all though I'm in my 90's I do appear to be more like my mid 30's.

Brian:   Oh incredible. Well whatever that plastic surgeon is we shouldn't plug 'em here.

Curtis B:   Yes.

Brian:   What's, now what about you on the personal side? Outside of this music thing what else do you do? Hobbies? What do you do?

Curtis B:   So one of my main things that I'm doing these days is handmade collage, or analog collage as you referred to in the scene.

Brian:   And if they don't know what that means?

Curtis B:   Yeah so cutting and pasting, sometimes ripping. Usually with scissors or an X-Acto blade and gluing or sometimes taping different pieces of magazine or brochure or pages out of a book or pretty much any random printed object. Taking pieces from different places and gluing them together into a new idea or concept or piece of art. And for visually getting to what I'm talking about you can check out my Instagram at Collage The World. It's basically the word college but with an A. Collage The World. My most recent piece I just finished a couple days ago is actually a collage featuring David Hinds who is the front man of the incredible Reggae band Steel Pulse. So-

Brian:   Nice.

Curtis B:   It's actually the first Reggae oriented collage I've done, but I'm spending quite a bit of time making him a collage, aka art, and that's something I've really been diving in hard on the past year or so and have gone down some serious rabbit holes on Instagram discovering and connecting with collage artists from all over the world. It's an amazing piece, style of art in that anyone can do it, even someone like Brian, who I don't know if he's artistic with paints or drawing or anything. He could take two pieces of paper, rip them or cut them and glue them into a new composition and I would by them for a lot.

Brian:   Oh but a [inaudible 00:08:48] somehow that, you know I love this, I love this conversation too because that's something that like the time and the patience that it must take to collage is just astronomical to find the right picture and then collage it together and that's ... And like I love creating. With the radio show and I'm the drummer in a rock band and so everybody has their art thing that they love and I love talking about this because that's like I personally wouldn't collage, but I've seen some collages that look absolutely incredible so I love that this is a cool little side thing you got going there.

Curtis B:   Well exciting side note, those of you who are familiar with Reggae music Chronixx, arguably, the biggest Reggae artist in the world right now who's in his 20's who's from Jamaica very talented. He also has an amazing band. Chronixx's most recent album Chronology which I think won, was Rolling Stone magazine in the top 50 albums of last year which Rolling Stone doesn't give too many nods to Reggae music so that's saying something. Chronixx's last album, the album cover and also the inner album artwork, if you have the vinyl or the CD, were done by a collage artist Dewey Saunders.

Brian:   Well look at that. Cool man.

Curtis B:   So album artwork which is always a very tricky thing as any band members or artist can attest to collage is any amazing way to go.

Brian:   That's cool. I do, now I want to ask you one piece, if my favorite question. If you could offer one piece of advice what would it be?

Curtis B:   Well you're going to hate this 'cause I know we're crunched on time, but I have a few things. First of all, go outside. Go outside five or ten minutes every afternoon, if you work at home this can be especially critical but also if you're at an office job at a cubicle take five to ten minutes, go outside in the afternoon, get some fresh air, even if it's nasty outside and if you're boss says, "Hey what's up?" You can be like, "Hey well what about Don who's smoking cigarettes all day long going outside? I don't need a cigarette to go take five minutes to feel a little bit better about myself and to get a breath of air and a recharge. My next advice and this is a critical one for music-

Brian:   Curtis you're such an overachiever. I asked for one man. You're such an overachiever.

Curtis B:   I know I'm sorry Brian but I'm going to tear through this. I work hard-

Brian:   How many do you have? Prepare me.

Curtis B:   I have three.

Brian:   Okay.

Curtis B:   So lesson number two if you're going to get a band tattoo don't just like let the tattoo artist pull an image off of the band's Myspace or something. Hit up the band and say, "Hey I want to get your logo or your recent album cover art tattooed. Can you send me the file?" You never know their manager-

Brian:   Is this a common thing?

Curtis B:   Band tattoos are very common and many bands I've worked with over the years occasionally will see a fan photo of, "Oh I got the Giant Panda logo." So hit up the band, get the original artwork before you get a tattoo that's going to change your life or ruin your life.

Brian:   Okay.

Curtis B:   And final piece of advice is, and this I, is something I'm trying to do more often. Acknowledge people and say thank you for things to people if it's a co-worker or whoever it is, even a routine thing, we all appreciate being acknowledged for hard work we do even if it's basic stuff or part of your job. You never know who can use a pick me up so saying thank you and appreciating people more is a good positive thing to do and we all like being appreciated.

Brian:   I love it. So be appreciative, go outside, and tattoos. That was an amazing collection of advice man. All right. So let's just back into some music. Oh and by the way if they want to find out more about you it's @ DC Reggae. Everything's @ DC Reggae.

Curtis B:   @ DC Reggae on all socials.

Brian:   Awesome.

5/1/18 - Special Guest: Emma G

Thanks to Emma G for hanging out with us in the studio this week!  We discovered her great music and her love of hugs!  :-)

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. ***"Knock Me Down" by Unsullied (Hard Rock, Punk)
  2. "Tumbling" by Emma G (Pop, Pop-Rock)
  3. "Go Down" by Eli Lev (Indie, Southern Rock)
  4. ***"So Down" by Mike Hauser (Pop, Modern-Crooner)
  5. "Anthem" by Yellowtieguy (Rock, Indie)

***The first time we've played this artist for you on the show, & a new artist profile added to our DC Artist Database!  There's new artists every week!

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


ANNOUNCEMENTS

FUNK PARADE IS TRYING WRIST BANDS THIS YEAR
For the first time, Funk Parade is announcing an General Festival Pass and Wristband ($10) to provide priority entrance into selected evening music venues.  Additionally we will be hosting our first ever Featured Showcase at the Historic Lincoln Theatre ($15-20) featuring Ari Lennox, Mannywellz and more.

MUSIC FEST WRISTBAND PASS
Ten dollars gets purchasers a FunkPowered General Festival Wristband, which will provide priority entry into the  the festival’s key evening music venues: Tropicalia, DC9, Ben’s Next Door, Franklin Hall, Signature Cuts & Shaves, Sollys, Velvet Lounge, Archipelago, Flash, Local 16, Sotto, Duffy’s, Marvin, Shaw Tavern, Exiles Bar, Bin 1301, Busboys & Poets, Songbyrd Music House (Late Night) and U Street Music Hall (Late Night).

The $10 wristband system is part of an effort to create a more sustainable future for Funk Parade, with a model that can continue to pay artists fairly to be a part of the festival.

HOW TO GET YOURS
Funk Parade has partnered with Eventbrite to sell the passes. To buy yours, Click HERE. They will also be available the day of the event at the Funk Parade Volunteer Tents at the Main Stage and in front of the Lincoln Theater, during the day fair on Saturday May 12 from 1:00pm - 7:00pm

HOW IT WORKS
To pick up your wristband, present your Eventbrite receipt at the Funk Parade Volunteer Tents at the Main Stage or the Lincoln Theater, or go to any of the participating venues in the evening starting at 7:00pm.


NEW MUSIC RELEASES

Our 2018 New Releases by DC Artists’ Spotify Playlist:
https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/7kbMQzbrQPisoJq5A76V3k


NEW VIDEOS

Our ‘DC Artists Official Music Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70kU0_uB-sdviWajkbzi2Akr


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Here’s just a few highlights for the coming week, be sure to check out the calendar for the full list of all the upcoming shows!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Fri May 4
Of Tomorrow @ 9:30 Club (Funk, RIYL Weather Report)
The Coolots @ Capital Fringe (Rock, RIYL Rage Against The Machine)

Sat May 5
Chris Cassaday & Surprise Attack @ Courthaus Social for 3 Year Anniversary Festival (Folk, Jam Band, RIYL Dave Matthews or Sublime)
Paperhaus @ Milkboy Arthouse (Indie, RIYL Radiohead)

Sun May 6
Feelfree @ Boomerang Boat Pirate Ship (Reggae, RIYL Steely Dan)
Zen Warship @ Bossa Bistro (Funk, RIYL Red Hot Chili Peppers)

Wed May 9
Kid Brother & Lavendar @ Gypsy Sally’s (Indie & Rock, RIYL The 1975 or Modest Mouse)

Thurs May 10
Jack Gregori @ Pearl Street Warehouse (Country, RIYL Waylon Jennings)


Patreon

Do you like what we're doing?  Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **Music 4 The Revolution (Abu Jibran)**


We're Looking For Sponsors

We're looking for local businesses to sponsor us!  Know One?  Would you introduce us to them?



Emma G

Video - Bio - Links - Transcript

Emma G's Bio:

Emma G DC Music Rocks

A unique combination of Adele, Pink, Tracy Chapman and Alanis Morrissette; singer/songwriter Emma G describes her sound as soul pop/rock. With gutsy vocals and inspiring lyrics, Emma G's melodies hammer home the messages of empowerment, love and respect.

Links:
Website
Patreon
Bandcamp
Instagram
Twitter
Facebook

Live at The Mint.jpg
Emma G Taking Flight.jpg

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:   Now, let me give you a proper introduction here. So, on DCmusicrocks.com, we are shining a spotlight on the great songs, artists, and incredible people behind the DC region's music scene. Emma G is a unique combination of Adele, Pink, Tracy Chapman, and Alanis Morrissette. She talked about it earlier, it's that amazing combination of all those people. It's like all my favorite people wrapped into one, and then Emma G was born. Which is- No wonder I love you so much.

Emma G:   Aw, man.

Brian:   It's one of those things. She's a singer, songwriter out of- What part of the city are you?

Emma G:   I'm originally from New Zealand, obviously.

Brian:   Yeah.

Emma G:   But I now call Brightwood my home.

[00:00:36]

Brian:   Brightwood? Which part?

Emma G:   Which nobody knows where that is.

Brian:   Yeah, where is Brightwood?

Emma G:   It's not Brentwood. It's not ... 'cause I'm...

Brian:   Thanks for clarifying. Okay.

Emma G:   So I'm a mile from Takoma.

Brian:   I got it. Okay. So up in the northeast, general. [crosstalk 00:00:48]

Emma G:   North west. North west.

Brian:   Technically you're right. It's northwest.

Emma G:   Yeah, it's northwest.

Brian:   It's the west of the capitol. So northwest, but up near Takoma and that area. I got it. She described her sound as a soul/pop/rock. And with gutsy vocals and inspiring lyrics, Emma G's melodies hammer home the messages of empowerment, love ,and respect. And thanks for being here.

Emma G:   Thanks.

Brian:   I've been a fan for well over a year now, so it's a treat to actually get to share you here on the show with.

Emma G:   It's funny because I feel like we've been cyber stalking one another for the last year.

Brian:   This is true.

Emma G:   I'm like ... I now know your face. This is exciting!

Brian:   That's right. I was just gonna say we just met for the first time today in person. But otherwise, yeah.

Emma G:   I have to say though, thank you for the hug.

Brian:   Of course.

Emma G:   And I'm so glad that you knew that I like hugs.

Brian:   I was gonna say if you didn't know by the way ... Talk to people about hugs. You give hugs at metros. Talk about the hug thing.

Emma G:   I am the hug dealer. Let's be real for a minute.

Brian:   The hug dealer? Some people are drug dealers, you're a hug dealer? Oh my God.

Emma G:   Endorphins make you happy

Brian:   This is like PG radio version of what a drug dealer is. Oh well the edited version, we'll call it a hug dealer.

Emma G:   No seriously. I mean The Washingtonian magazine, when they named me as one of the best of DC last year, they made mention of me giving hugs daily. And it's true. I don't know if it's because I'm from New Zealand or I'm just some hippy chick or what. For me, music is all about connection, right? And what better way to manifest that connection than through a high five or a hug, something to just be like, hey, I'm a real person, you're a real person, we're enjoying this moment together. Let's hug it out, bro.

Brian:   Hug it out. So next time you see Emma, don't be shy. Hug it out. Oh my God, I feel like that's almost like a hashtag or you should wear that as a T-shirt.

Emma G:   Hug it out, bro?

Brian:   Don't be shy, hug it out. Or hug it out, bro, something. That would be so good.

Emma G:   Oh my God, yes.

Brian:   So you play around. You said you do this full time, so talk about the places that you play, or where will they see you around time?

Emma G:   Before I moved here, I discovered Amanda Palmer, who is originally from Boston. And she made a career for herself as a street performer, we call it busking in New Zealand.

Brian:   Busking. Got it. I've heard that term.

Emma G:   Not bussing. I don't waitress. Busking.

Brian:   No, no, no. Busking with a k. B-u-s-k. Busking.

Emma G:   It's a very gendered term.

Brian:   For those persons who don't know, busking means you're playing outside with a hat out or at a metro stop or different places around and busking.

Emma G:   So I moved here in November 2015 and just was like stuff it, I'm gonna try my hand at busking. And that's how I've managed to do everything that I've done. I've met some amazing humans, including my partner. We met while I was busking.

Brian:   Really?

Emma G:   Yep, 'cause that's romantic.

Brian:   Yeah, there's nothing like playing outside at whatever time in the morning that was  ... there you go, cute girl playing music.

Emma G:   Especially because everywhere in the western world and in America at the moment that seems, nobody likes mornings, right? And so, I'm a Crossfitter, so I'm used to getting up super early and working out, but now instead of working out super early, I just go and sing and hopefully make people's days start better, and it's super fun!

Brian:   Do you have hours, or certain stops? What's that like?

Emma G:   Yeah, so I have a certain rotation that I try and keep up unless it's raining or unless somebody... Every now and then, you get somebody who isn't aware of my schedule that comes in, and that's cool. We're all about community, we're all about sharing the love, and what not, but generally speaking, Tuesdays I'm at Federal Triangle metro station, Wednesdays I'm at Foggy Bottom GWU Hospital, Thursdays L'Enfant Plaza, Fridays at Farragut North, and then Saturdays, I'm sometimes at the Silver Spring Market. And I do other [inaudible 00:04:56] markets as well.

Brian:   Yeah! And that's mornings? Or evenings? Or rush hours? Anytime?

Emma G:   6:30 in the morning, darling.

Brian:   6:30?

Emma G:   6:30 in the morning.

Brian:   Every morning?

Emma G:   Every morning.

Brian:   God, Emma I am so impressed with the dedication here. Holy smokes.

Emma G:   It makes for a really fun evening night life. I'm like, right! Ten o'clock-bedtime!

Brian:   Time to go to bed. I gotta work in the morning. Yep. Absolutely. Oh god, that's funny.

Emma G:   Such a rockstar.

Brian:   Yeah, you are. Oh, my god. Which is evidenced by the album and all the other stuff you have going on.

Emma G:   And I wish I drank coffee. Legitimately, I wish that I could use that as a vice to keep me awake. But no, I'm just a really big fan of nana naps.

Brian:   Nano naps?

Emma G:   Nana naps. In New Zealand, we call grandmas "nanas."

Brian:   Oh, I see.

Emma G:   Is that not an American thing? Nobody knows?

Brian:   No, I haven't heard that. But say more! So a nana nap means...

Emma G:   A nana nap is like a quick power nap.

Brian:   That's where nana falls asleep and her chin drops to her chest for five minutes and then she wakes back up

Emma G:   And starts drooling, and it's really awkward.

Brian:   Yeah? Okay. Oh, my god. One day, you should livestream your nana nap. I don't know.

Emma G:   I don't think that that is safe.

Brian:   No, no, no. That's a terrible idea. Nevermind. Terrible idea.

Emma G:   Oh goodness.

Brian:   Oh, that's funny. Speaking of this, talk about what's a funny or memorable moment that comes to mind when you think about the busking that you were doing. What comes to mind when you think about that?

Emma G:   A funny moment?

Brian:   Yeah.

Emma G:   I don't really, I can't think of any funny moments 'cause every moment that I've had that's memorable has mostly been really just heartwarming. The most heartwarming moment I had was-I was singing all the time at Foggy Bottom on Wednesday mornings and then I was in Iowa for Christmas 'cause that's where my Norwegian family, I know, obviously I'm Norwegian.

Brian:   Obviously.

Emma G:   Obviously. My Norwegian family live in Iowa, so I was away for the Christmas holidays, and I came back and I tried out a different station one day an this woman came rushing up to me and handed me an envelope. And she said, "I've been looking for you everywhere!" And then she's like, "I've gotta go. Thank you. Bye." And I'm like sitting going, this is America, and she's given me an unmarked envelope. What do I do?

Brian:   And we've been talking about ISIS! Should I be worried? Okay.

Emma G:   ISIS? What? Okay. Anyways, so I opened the envelope and she'd given me a Starbucks gift card, which was lovely. But she had typed out this A4, sorry what do you call it? The standard legal, letter size page typed letter highlighting everything that I had given her over the last six months.

Brian:   Holy smokes.

Emma G:   She apparently survives on four or five hours of sleep a night. She works too much, she's got two children that she raises by herself. Her lights in her life that she highlighted were God, her children, and my music on Wednesday mornings.

Brian:   Wow.

Emma G:   And so I just kind of cried a little bit and then got a tattoo in her honor.

Brian:   Wow.

Emma G:   Part of this is for her, so yeah, that's my most memorable moment while busking.

Brian:   Wow. Gosh. That's amazing. I love that story.

Emma G:   Thank you.

Brian:   And what about, so now outside of busking and music, talk about you on the personal side. Hobbies? What do you do for fun?

Emma G:   I sleep when I can.

Brian:   Yep, okay.

Emma G:   It's important. Like I said, I do CrossFit. Health and well-being is really important to me. But I'm also really lucky that I'm in a relationship with somebody who is also self-employed, so we spend our days trying not to kill each other. No, I'm kidding.

Brian:   Well, if you're both at home. I understand.

Emma G:   Yeah, we work really hard throughout the day and swap notes and he's writing a book and doing all kinds of empowerment stuff, and I'm writing music and doing all kinds of empowerment stuff, so it aligns really well. We're planning a tour at the moment, and yeah, just kind of trying to balance social life and sunshine and Vitamin D with sleep and health/fitness and watching movies and trying to stay sane. Meditation's become a really big part of my life at the moment.

Brian:   Okay.

Emma G:   Cooking, gardening.

Brian:   Excellent.

Emma G:   I've discovered the love of gardening.

Brian:   Nice. How does that manifest itself? Does that mean you started with tomato plants? What does that actually mean?

Emma G:   No, we started with-I can't remember what they're called. We bought some trees and planted them in front of Mark's house. So we've just been slowly pecking away at making the house look pretty.

Brian:   That's awesome.

Emma G:   And getting really dirty while doing it.

Brian:   Absolutely. Oh, my god, getting dirty in the garden. Excellent.

Emma G:   It's frightening because at least in New Zealand, you don't have anything that can kill you. Here, you have snakes and you've got poisonous spiders. Part of me is like, it's okay, I can do this barehanded or whatever, and them I'm like, oh, there's things that can kill me.

Brian:   Come bite me. Yeah. Oh my god.

Emma G:   There's that.

Brian:   That would be a funny thing. One of my favorite questions to ask is if you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be?

Emma G:   Floss.

Brian:   Say more on that. Where does that come from?

Emma G:   Because I'm in the middle of getting...In America, it would have cost me fifteen thousand dollars to get my teeth fixed. I'm not going through that system. I'm actually going to Canada back and forth. It's cheaper. A lot cheaper.

Brian:   To get dentist stuff done.

Emma G:   Yeah. So I've had two root canals and I've had to get fourteen fillings.

Brian:   And if you would have flossed, that could have been avoided.

Emma G:   I feel like that's probably not the whole solution, but I feel like it probably contributes a lot.

Brian:   Been a big part of it.

Emma G:   So if we're on that token, then I guess just don't procrastinate stuff.

Brian:   Ah, I see.

Emma G:   If you're having an issue. That's life advice for anything.

Brian:   That's true.

Emma G:   Musical, business. Don't procrastinate.

Brian:   Yep.

Emma G:   It's not going to go away.

Brian:   Stay on top of it.

Emma G:   Just do it.

Brian:   There was that song, god, years ago. Fifteen, twenty years ago that was like-if you could offer one piece of advice, wear sunscreen. And I feel like you just hit us with another one of those. Floss!

Emma G:   There was a fantastic remix of that speech. Wear sunscreen. Who was that? Yeah. It's on YouTube, though. It's beautiful.

Brian:   There you go.

Emma G:   It's like this Moby-esque kind of speech online. Wearing sunscreen and life advice.

Brian:   Yeah. Absolutely.

Emma G:   Sorry.

Brian:   God, it was a graduation class. I remember. I'm going to have to go back and listen to it now that we're talking about it.

Emma G:   Yes. Wear sunscreen.

Brian:   Yep.

Emma G:   And floss.

Brian:   That's a good one.

4/24/18 - Special Guest: Hayley Fahey

Thanks to Hayley Fahey for hanging out with us in the studio this week!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. Fellowcraft - Stonehearted (Hard Rock, Grunge)
  2. Mine, by Hayley Fahey (Indie Rock, Alternative)
  3. Angeline, by The Sidleys (Blues, Funk)
  4. ***Emily, by Ara Casey (Indie, Folk)
  5. Welcome To My Day, by Eric Scott (Pop, Folk Acoustic)

***The first time we've played this artist for you on the show, & a new artist profile added to our DC Artist Database!  There's new artists every week!

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


ANNOUNCEMENTS

STREAM BRIAN’S NEW SONG TWICE?!
Brian’s band, Fellowcraft, released their new single, Stonehearted, on all platforms.  Brian’s humble request...would you stream it twice? All the links to access it everywhere are at the link below.  It’s been 2 years in the making, the upcoming full album, “Three”, is due out later this summer.

http://www.fellowcraftband.com/stonehearted


NEW MUSIC RELEASES

  • Sub-Radio - Headfirst (5 Song Indie EP, RIYL Walk The Moon)

  • Flasher - Pressure (Rock Single, RIYL a-ha)

  • Nitemoves - Don’t Ask! (11 Song Album, RIYL EDM/Techno)

  • Names - Pink House (9 Song Rock Album, RIYL Radiohead)

  • Thievery Corporation - Treasures From The Temple (12 Song World Album, RIYL Boozoo Bajou)

  • Fellowcraft - Stonehearted (Hard Rock Single, RIYL Soundgarden)

Our 2018 New Releases by DC Artists’ Spotify Playlist:
https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/7kbMQzbrQPisoJq5A76V3k


NEW VIDEOS

Our ‘DC Artists Official Music Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70kU0_uB-sdviWajkbzi2Akr


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Here’s just a few highlights for the coming week, be sure to check out the calendar for the full list of all the upcoming shows!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Fri Apr 27
--Sub-Radio (EP Release) & Throwing Plates @ Jammin Java (Indie Rock, RIYL Norah Jones, Walk The Moon)
--Queue @ Slash Run (Indie, RIYL The Cranberries)

Sat Apr 28
--Hayley Fahey (Album Release) @ Villian & Saint (Rock, RIYL Eva Cassidy, Zac Brown Band)
--G.U.M.P. @ Black Cat (Hip Hop, RIYL N.E.R.D.)
--Time Is Fire @ Rock and Roll Hotel (Rock, RIYL Public Image Ltd)

Wed May 2
--Jonny Grave @ Pearl Street Warehouse (Blues, RIYL Junior Kimbrough)

Thurs May 3
--Beanstalk Library @ Kennedy Center Millenium Stage (Rock, RIYL The Replacements
--Two Ton Twig @ State Theatre (Bluegrass, RIYL The Hackenshaw Boys)
--Den-Mate @ Black Cat (Electronic Indie, RIYL Portishead)


Patreon

Do you like what we're doing?  Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **Music 4 The Revolution (Abu Jibran)**


We're Looking For Sponsors

We're looking for local businesses to sponsor us!  Know One?  Would you introduce us to them?



Hayley Fahey

Video - Bio - Links - Transcript

Hayley's Bio:

Hayley Fahey Sings

Hayley Fahey is a singer-songwriter who captivates audiences with her sparkling range and originality. What sets her apart, in addition to her writing and voice, are her live stage performances and the presence she has, exuding energy, confidence and love for the music. When Hayley is on stage, she’s home.

Fahey draws from the many influences of her Washington, D.C. area home. The soulful sound of R&B translates into her passionate vocal performances. Her writing and sound are versatile and inspiring, from her indie-folk vibe to catchy pop hooks that get stuck in your head. She performs both solo and with her band of seasoned professionals on impressive stages like the 9:30 Club, State Theatre, Bethesda Blues and Jazz Club, Rams Head Live, and many more. She has recorded two full length albums, the second of which to be released April 28th, 2018. 

Web: http://hayleyfahey.com
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/HayleyFaheyMusic /
Instagram: @HayleyNotes / https://www.instagram.com/HayleyNotes 
Twitter: @HeyHayleyMusic / https://twitter.com/HeyHayleyMusic 
SoundCloud: https://soundcloud.com/hayley-fahey 

Hayley Fahey
Hayley Fahey guitar

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:    On DC Music Rocks we're shining a spotlight on the great songs, artists, and incredible people behind the DC regions local music scene. Hayley Fahey is singer song writer from Washington DC and you said Rockville specifically, right?

Hayley Fahey:    Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Brian:    And what sets her apart, in addition to her writing and voice, are her live stage performances and the presence she has. Exuding energy, confidence, and love for the music. When Hayley is on stage she's home. I've actually seen this in action several times including when she performed at last years DC Music Rocks festival at the nine thirty club, which was incredible and she was right at home, its really true, when she was up there. Her writing and sound are versatile and inspiring. From her indie folk vibe, to the catchy, pop hooks like “mine” that you just heard, that get stuck in your head. Which happened to me this week, definitely stuck in my head. She performs both solo and with her band and she's recorded two full length albums and this is the second one that's coming out Saturday, April 28th called “Out There”

 Hayley, thanks for being here.

Hayley Fahey:    Thanks for having me.

Brian:    Such a treat to have you here and get to share cause I, selfishly I know all about you because I've been a fan for a while and you performed at the festival but for those folks listening who don't know you, it's a treat to actually get to share you with them now, because this is such a treat. So, describe yourself. What would you say is, well what's special about this album coming out? What is it for you?

Hayley Fahey:    Its different because its, it shows a different side of my music. Shows me with the full band and the songs have a lot of variation in them and emotion. There's some songs like “Mine” that are super fun, super upbeat and really happy, and then there's other songs on the album like "Dry Ice" or "Your Name” or “From Dusk till Dawn” that are a little bit darker and it kinda shows a different side of the music.

Brian:    There it is. Where do you, where does it come from, these things? Are these personal experiences, do you read it in books and get inspired? Where do the songs come from on this album?

Hayley Fahey:    On this album I'd say a lot of it is personal experience and also just experiences of even people around me that are close to me that I've seen having life experiences and I write things about them.

Brian:    Wow. Its kind of cool to hear that to because that's, I feel like that where a lot of artists get their inspiration and at the same time its really fun to then hear that transformed into the songs like you've done this album. Its such a treat.

 Now talk about your earliest memory with music. What comes to mind?

Hayley Fahey:    Earliest memory with music. I remember I would sing and have little performances for my family at family gatherings. Whenever there was a chance I would be up there singing my heart away.

Brian:    And how old were you? How old are we talking when you say that?

Hayley Fahey:    I remember being four years old, gathering my cousins to listen.

Brian:    What were you singing? Was it certain songs that you knew the words to, or what was it?

Hayley Fahey:    Yeah, my dad was a big music lover. Both of my parents were big music lovers, but he taught me one of the songs that was one of my favorites he would sing to me was “My Girl.” I loved to sing that.

Brian:    Oh my god, that's so cliché and so good at the same time. Shout out to your dad, I love it.

Hayley Fahey:    Hey dad!

Brian:    I love it. I love it. And so, now what about your first memory performing? Is it that same thing, at family gatherings? Or what's actually performing for someone other than your family, what's the first memory that comes to mind?

Hayley Fahey:    I remember singing in church choir. I was always in choir growing up.

Brian:    Now this is also, its been Rockville the whole time?

Hayley Fahey:    Yeah. Rockville, Derwood, pretty much my whole life. I went to University of Maryland so I lived in College Park for a while.

Brian:    Oh wow, so it really has been Maryland pretty much the whole time.

Hayley Fahey:    Yeah its been Maryland. Maryland girl.

Brian:    Oh I love it. God, that's amazing. So outside of music then, what are your hobbies? Or on the personal side how do you also spend your time, besides music?

Hayley Fahey:    I love spending time with my friends.

Brian:    Which by the way if you follow her on Instagram, she generally has at least a couple of adorable photos with friends at some point, absolutely.

Hayley Fahey:    Generally yes, I do post them. We like to go for walks, go out to see other live DC music. I like to go to the gym, like to spend time with my boyfriend, shout out Daniel.

Brian:    Yup, alright got it. Friends and gym.

Hayley Fahey:    All that kind of good stuff.

Brian:    And as far as the arts go is music kind of your main thing? Sometimes other artists also like paint or write poetry, or some other things. Is music your main, or are there other arts for you?

Hayley Fahey:    That's a good question. Music is my main art, but I do have another side passion, artistic passion, and that's video.

Brian:    Really?

Hayley Fahey:    Yes.

Brian:    Talk about that a little bit.

Hayley Fahey:    I shoot my own music videos, and edit my music videos usually. Or sometimes I get other people to shoot them cause its hard to take videos of myself.

Brian:    Obviously, selfie videos are just not quite as flattering somehow.

Hayley Fahey:    Yeah, I'll have my friends hold the camera or hire pretty good, a local videographer too. I also do videos for other artists, I have a company called DC music and video and I do video for different artists.

Brian:    That's cool. Now, music’s full time, and how long ago did that come along, with the video editing? Cause music’s been the whole time, so how long has the music video thing been happening?

Hayley Fahey:    I've been editing videos since middle school. I went to a middle school for media production at the same time that I was really finding out that I loved music so, so much, this is kind of what I wanted to do. I was also finding out wow I love video too, so kind of at the same time.

Brian:    Wow, okay. So its been video too. That said then you certainly should check out Hayley’s YouTube channel and checkout some of her music videos because they are, I remember sharing the news about, I think it was called “Fire”, did you have a single called “Fire?”

Hayley Fahey:    I did have a single called “Fire”, yes.

Brian:    There's a music video that came out with that one that was a lot of fun, sort of out in the woods, playing around with the wood friends.

Hayley Fahey:    And fire

Brian:    And fire, of course, lots of fire. Oh I love it. So what about, talk about your funniest moment that comes to mind on stage, performing?

Hayley Fahey:    Oh my gosh. Well there have been a lot of great moments with the band, I have to say.

Brian:    Oh do share. When you say a lot of great moments, that's like such a tease. Don't tease us now, come on.

Hayley Fahey:    Oh man. The one that I can think of was one time, there's always talk about you know, band drama, there's band relationships, this and that, but Isaac and I, Isaac is my bass player, have gotten teased so much. He's my good friend, I just remember one time we were playing a gig out in Fredrick at The Blue Side and this woman was like shouting from off the stage, like "Why don't you just make a move already" and all this stuff. We couldn't even get through the song, everyone on stage, we were all laughing so much.

Brian:    Oh my god. And there is nothing between you and the bass player then?

Hayley Fahey:    No, no I have another relationship, you know, he has other relationship and this and that but it was just..

Brian:    Wow. Actually while were talking about that, how did the band come together then? Has it always been this group, or how long has it been the group that it is now that recorded this?

Hayley Fahey:    This group was my first band.

Brian:    Awesome. So like ever since you started in I guess, high school, or college too?

Hayley Fahey:    Yeah. I started, I gathered the band two years ago at the end of college was when I started playing with the full band.

Brian:    Wow, and its been two years, still together?

Hayley Fahey:    Still together. And we came together, we actually all are from Derwood, or live in Derwood.

Brian:    No way! Now if they don't know where Derwood is, where is Derwood? And the proper pronunciation, is Derwood?

Hayley Fahey:    It is Derwood, it's a little town that people generally say is Rockville, but its actually Derwood.

Brian:    Got it, okay.

Hayley Fahey:    And its kind of near Gaithersburg, or Rockville in Maryland, but it is its own place.

Brian:    its own place that's in between Rockville

Hayley Fahey:    In between the better known cities, its agriculturally zoned, it is its own little place.

Brian:    Oh so like farming?

Hayley Fahey:    I guess so, and its known for the Out of the Way Café.

Brian:    Right. Oh I've seen you play shows there sometimes. Yeah, absolutely. Did I read somewhere, you might have shared that at some point that that was one of your first gigs, was at the Out of the Way Café?

Hayley Fahey:    It was, it absolutely was, yeah.

Brian:    Do you remember what you performed at that first gig?

Hayley Fahey:    Yes, I do. I remember my uncle Pat was here, he's actually gonna be a special guest at the c.d. release party. You heard it here first.

Brian:    Uncle Pat, shout out. There he is, alright.

Hayley Fahey:    He's a mandolin player and he's coming in from California to be a little surprise guest, but I remember playing "Georgia"

Brian:    Oh my goodness, going to the classics, love it. Alright now, what's one thing in your music collection that might surprise us?

Hayley Fahey:    I have several Stevie Wonder albums.

Brian:    Really?

Hayley Fahey:    Yes, I also loved the Dixie Chicks growing up. Listened to a lot of Dixie Chicks, and a lot of Otis Redding.

Brian:    Really?

Hayley Fahey:    I remember singing a lot of Otis Redding and a lot of Stevie Wonder. At musical theater camp everyone would do a talent and they would usually all sing Broadway songs and I would go up there and sing an Otis Redding or a Stevie Wonder song,

Brian:    Oh my god, that's amazing. What song are you thinking of when you say that? Was there one that was like, if I'm gonna do it, this is my default?

Hayley Fahey:    I definitely remember “try a little tenderness”

Brian:    Alright, so if you're listening and you don't know what that is, go on YouTube or whatever your music setting is and check out "try a little tenderness" and see what she's talking about. That's funny, and if there's video somewhere and I ever find it I promise to share it with you. But there isn't that I'm aware of so we won't call her out on that just yet. Now tell a story about one time you tried and failed.

Hayley Fahey:    Okay, I will.

Brian:    Okay, tell us. I'm sitting, I'm ready. Sock it to me.

Hayley Fahey:    There's been many times that I auditioned for things, didn't get in kind of thing. Tried and failed. I assume you're talking about music, tried and failed thing.

Brian:    In general, I mean obviously that would be the one that seems relevant to you, so yeah talk about that.

Hayley Fahey:    This is true. So several times I have auditioned for American Idol, or the Voice a couple of times and I just remember one time specially I went in, I got a call back, like one of those executive producer call backs. They found me somewhere and they said “can you come in for a private audition?” And I came in for the audition and I sang twenty seconds of my song and they were like "thank you sweetie, but it's a no from us.” And then I left, and I drove back home. I was out in, I think I was in Philadelphia for that.

Brian:    Wow, and what were you saying to yourself when you were on the way home after that?

Hayley Fahey:    I was so upset. I was like “there's nothing more for me in music.”

Brian:    Oh it was one of those questioning your whole life stories

Hayley Fahey:    Nineteen year old me

Brian:    "What am I doing? Why am I doing this?” Oh god, and then what happened? You picked yourself up or you, what happened after that? Cause you're still here, and you're still singing.

Hayley Fahey:    I'm trying, I'm still going

Brian:    Well there's a lot of people that think that you're doing a lot more than trying, they think you're succeeding.

Hayley Fahey:    Well thank you

Brian:    For sure, and if that song that just played is any indication, I think you're succeeding too. So I'm glad that the American Idol judges didn't knock you off your track here. So now my favorite question to ask is if you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be?

Hayley Fahey:    Biggest piece of advice is, follow your heart. I know that's so cliché, but..

Brian:    Yeah, say more about what that means.

Hayley Fahey:    I'm a music teacher, and I teach all sorts of kids

Brian:    What kind of music teacher, when you say that?

Hayley Fahey:    I teach piano, guitar, voice lessons

Brian:    So like, private lessons and stuff?

Hayley Fahey:    Private lessons generally, private lessons and I'll go to peoples houses. I've taught at studios before and one of the biggest things I try to teach my students is confidence in yourself, and I think that's something we all work on and that were all constantly learning and were all constantly evolving. But just confidence in yourself and following your dreams to the best of your ability. That's what I would say.

Brian:    Absolutely, great advice. Especially with music and with your passions outside of work. I feel like a lot of people listening might have those nine to five, Monday to Friday jobs, I mean gosh knows I do too, but at the same time you kind of gotta follow your heart and do the things that make you feel alive. I love that advice. Now and one last thing for those people who wanna find out more, follow you, find out what you're doing, where do they go?

Hayley Fahey:    They can go to hayleyfahey.com. Hayley with two y's. H-a-y-l-e-y.

Brian:    Yes, the spelling. Let's reiterate that. Its H-a-y-l-e-y. And Fahey is..

Hayley Fahey:    F as in frank, a-h-e-y.com

Brian:    So there's a lot of a's and y's, but its hayleyfahey. And its F-a-h-e-y. HayleyFahey.com.

 And is there a social media you tend to gravitate toward more than the others? Or you use them all, I'm assuming?

Hayley Fahey:    I use them all. I love Instagram, @hayleynotes

Brian:    Got it.

4/17/18 - Special Guest: Chip Py of Locally Grown DC

Thanks to Chip Py, creator of video series Locallygrowndc.com and official photographer for Chuck Brown, for hanging out with us in the studio this week!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. ***This Time, by Zen Warship (Funk, Funk Rock)
  2. Cups to the Floor, by Rare Essence (R&B, GoGo)
  3. Forgiveness, by Sol Roots (Blues, Funk)
  4. ***Falling, by Kia Bennett (R&B, Soul)
  5. Come and Get It, by Pebble To Pearl (R&B, Funk)

***The first time we've played this artist for you on the show, & a new artist profile added to our DC Artist Database!  There's new artists every week!

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


ANNOUNCEMENTS

--OUR POP PLAYLIST IS UP!
Do you listen to Top 40 music?  Here’s 54 songs by 54 different DC artists we think you’ll love. This is just a taste of the incredible selection of Pop music we have in the DC Artist Database on our website.  We hope you’ll follow the playlist, and start following the artists you like! Listening local is good for the soul!  
Direct Link:  https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/7fXS5Ed2J0WZpxMMpUljJV
All Our Playlists:  http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/playlists/

--Congrats to the winners from the Washington City Paper’s “Best Of” reader’s poll, here’s some of the local music scene highlights:

  • Best Go-go band:  Rare Essence
  • Best Jazz/Blues Venue:  Blues Alley
  • Best Arts & Culture Festival:  Funk Parade
  • Best Local Original Band: Stone Driver,
    • Runner’s Up:  Batala Washington, Aztec Sun Band
  • Best Music Festival: Kingman Island Bluegrass & Folk Festival
  • Best Music Venue:  9:30 Club
  • Best Place To Experience Local Music:  Black Cat
  • Best Recording Studio:  Blue Room Productions

--Thanks to District Karaoke for allowing me the honor of being a #judge of the #citywide championships this week!  Caught Night Train 357 there and so many local artists we cover on this show have come through #DK. My bassist in Fellowcraft, Brandon Williams, and so many other people I love have spent time with this group.  I had a blast!


NEW MUSIC RELEASES

Our 2018 New Releases by DC Artists’ Spotify Playlist:
https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/7kbMQzbrQPisoJq5A76V3k


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Here’s just a few highlights for the coming week, be sure to check out the calendar for the full list of all the upcoming shows!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Fri Apr 20
--Albino Rhino & Surprise Attack @ Jammin Java in Vienna (Funk, RIYL Phish)
--FeelFree @ Union Stage (Reggae, RIYL SOJA)
--Staycation @ 9:30 Club (Funk, RIYL Red Hot Chili Peppers)
 

Sat Apr 21
--Soundproof Genie & QOK Music @ Savor Bowie (MD) Music Festival (Pop/R&B, RIYL The Fugees, No Doubt)
--Jonny Grave @ DC9 (Blues, RIYL Burnside)
--See-I @ National Cannabis Festival at RFK Stadium (Reggae, RIYL Thievery Corporation)
--Skribe @ Takoma Park Earth Day (Folk, RIYL Pearl Jam)
 

Sun Apr 22
--Laura Tsaggaris @ Pearl Street Warehouse (Rock, RIYL Aimee Mann)
 

Mon Apr 23
--Mystery Friends @ DC9 Nightclub (Indie, RIYL LCD Soundsystem)
 

Tues Apr 24
--Thaylobleu @ Black Cat (Hard Rock, RIYL Bad Brains)
 

Wed Apr 25
--Broke Royals & Eli Lev @ Rock N Roll Hotel (Rock, RIYL Bastille, The Lumineers)
 

Thu Apr 26
--Veronneau @ Blues Alley Brazil Week (Jazz/World, RIYL Pink Martini)


Patreon

Do you like what we're doing?  Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **Music 4 The Revolution (Abu Jibran)**


We're Looking For Sponsors

We're looking for local businesses to sponsor us!  Know One?  Would you introduce us to them?



Chip Py

Video - Bio - Links - Transcript

Chip Py DC Music Rocks

Chip Py is a local DC Photographer who has been photo documenting the DC Music Scene for the 15 years. He has worked in a wide genre of music scenes including Punk, Roots Rock, Rockabilly and Go-Go.

He is best known for his work in Go-Go as one of Chuck Brown's Official Photographers and his work with Chuck Brown can be seen on Chuck's final album cover and at The Chuck Brown Park.

Four the last three years Chip Py has been producing a Video Podcast from his overgrown 100% organic back yard garden, which he calls The Yarden.  Each week in the late Spring and early Summer Chip invites a different local musical act over to Grill and Groove in The Yarden.

Which he records into a 30 minute video program that includes musician interview and live performance. Often guests from different genres are brought together for the show. 

In the last three "Seasons" he has produced 27 episodes and had 71 musicians perform in The Yarden.

The shows past and present can be seen here www.LocallyGrownDC.com

https://www.facebook.com/chip.py.52

Funk Parade attire Chip Py

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:   I appreciate Go-Go because a lot of bands are like, "Oh, you can dance to this", or, "Let me see some dancing." They're like, "No, let's just make a song and tell you what to do. Everybody with a cup to the floor right now." I really appreciate that, it's so good. I love it.  Chip, congratulations on your win and thanks for coming and being a guest as a result of all that car dancing man.

Chip Py:   All right, I'm excited to be here.

Brian:   This is such a treat. Now, let me give you a proper introduction here. On DC Music Rocks, we're shining a spotlight on the great songs, artists, and incredible people behind the DC region's music scene.

     Chip Py is a local DC photographer who has been photo documenting the DC music scene for 15 years across a wide genre of music scenes including punk, roots rock, rockabilly, and Go-Go. He's best known for his work in Go-Go as one of Chuck Brown's official photographers. His work with Chuck Brown can be seen on Chuck's final album cover and the Chuck Brown Park.

      For the last three years, Chip has been producing a video podcast from his overgrown 100% organic backyard garden, which he calls the Yarden. Each week in the late spring and early summer, Chip invites different local musical acts from all over to grill and groove in The Yarden, which he records into 30 minute video programs that includes interviews and the live performance.

     Often the guests from different genres are brought together for the shows. In the last three seasons he's produced 27 episodes and has 71 musicians that have now performed in The Yarden.

     That video of course, I'm not going to hold it out on you. I'm going to have the link to his winning car dance video, will be included with this episode so you can check him out doing his thing in his car too.

Chip Py:   It's one of my finest moments.

Brian:   Chip, I appreciate you. I've heard about you for so long in the scene now with the different things you're doing and being involved in the different genres, and what you do in it. Basically for me, it's an honor to have you here. Thanks for being here.

Chip Py:   Thank you.

Brian:   What is it do you feel that makes the Locally Grown DC thing that you're doing, what makes it special?

Chip Py:   What does make it special? I don't know that there's anything else like it. I'm certain there's other little, people have music shows and stuff like that, but nobody has the backdrop of The Yarden.

      I'm not really a videographer, I'm a photographer. I'm also a gardener, everything except for the tree in the corner in that garden, in that Yarden, was planted by me. What I actually enjoy doing about it creatively photographic wise is working the bands and the artists into the growth that I have in the garden in The Yarden.

     Each morning before the show, "Hey, I put the chicken on", because I do feed them and then walk around The Yarden and figure out how I'm going to compose each band and get the angles and the shots going so that it has a different kind of look every year.

    Some people have walked in and gone, "Oh, I didn't know it was so small." It's just an average sized yard in Silver Spring, but they've seen multi different angles from it. That's what I as a photographer bring.

     As a DC music person, I have relationships with many bands that I've worked with so that I can feel comfortable asking them to come perform in The Yarden. Getting this things off the ground was a crazy idea, and I'm fortunate that the first five people said, "Yeah, that's a great idea."

Brian:   Absolutely, getting them in there. Talk a little bit too about the photography stuff. You were mentioning at one point about the multiple genres, we brought up the different genres. Talk about photography and multiple genres.

Chip Py:   First of all, my video skills are nil compared to a lot of videographers out there. Most of my shows I've shot with just simply a one camera mic. I'm adding a second camera this year, so that's going to be fun. That'll increase my video skills.

    I tell people I'm a photographer, I'm a still photographer. That's what I enjoy and I'm a huge music fan. If I can catch your groove, I can capture your groove. If I can catch your groove, I can capture your groove in almost any lighting situation.

    Most of the bands that I shoot, when I walk into the venue, when any photographer walks in there, we'll walk in and go, "I can't shoot in this venue, there's no lights." There's nothing coming in. One of the places I've been shooting rockabilly is Hank Dietle's Tavern, which recently burnt down. Hank Dietle's Tavern has been there for 100 years.

Brian:   Oh no. What part of the city is that?

Chip Py:   Rockville, Maryland. Right across from White Flint Mall, where White Flint Mall used to be is where Hank Dietle's used to be. There is a movement to save Hank Dietle's. We have raised money and Hank Dietle's will rise again.

    The only light in there is the lights off the pinball machines, pinball machines and a Miller Light sign. They've pushed the pool table out of the way, so that's the light that I have to work with in there.

    I don't throw a strobe on and simply let it simply blast the whole light. When I do use a strobe, and I often use a strobe, I'm bouncing it off of something and using it as a fill flash. If you're a photographer and understand it, you have to utilize part of the light in the room, it's just a little bit of what you give it.

    When I was photographing Go-Go, because most of the Go-Gos were played in venues where there were absolutely no stage lighting. I was able to bounce light off using fill flash, I actually used pieces of plastic from a milk carton that I strapped to the top of my strobe. Meter the light in the room, back off, close the aperture a bit, bring it down for a little bit of light in there.

Brian:   Now there's different genres too. What made you jump from the different genres? How'd that come about?

Chip Py:   I had been shooting a lot of the roots rock and the punk rock bands in DC because that was the music scene that I was into.

Brian:   When was that?

Chip Py:   I went digital '03. In college I was shooting, I remember I was shooting the [inaudible 00:06:36] bands that came around East Carolina University where I was. The Bad Checks, and I'll remember the name in a minute.

Brian:   That's all right.

Chip Py:   What I started doing probably about seven or eight years ago, I started wondering why I was doing this. I came to the conclusion that I was creating a collection of what the DC music scene is, what it is at the time in which I'm shooting.

    I knew that of the whole DC scene, there was this thing called Go-Go. As a white guy from DC, I didn't know anything about Go-Go other than Chuck Brown. In order to have my collection complete, I wanted to have some pictures of Chuck Brown.

 

    What I didn't know was how lively, because Rare Essence is not the only band, there are hundreds of people who play Go-Go in this city. They're not in front of you, you can't go and open the city paper and see where to go see them. It's an underground scene, which the fact that people who know Go-Go know where Go-Go is.

     It's not played at music venues, oftentimes it's played in restaurants and bars where the promoters come in and rent the place out for the evening.

Brian:   If it's your first time going to a Go-Go show, you've got any tips or advice on somebody who's never been to a Go-Go show?

Chip Py:   Yeah, my advice is go.

Brian:   That was so profound. While they're at it, when they go, dancing? Is it feel welcome, is it a welcoming environment? What makes people stay away?

Chip Py:   I had friends tell me that as a white guy I shouldn't go to Go-Gos. Literally, I just walked into the La Fontaine Bleue on night with my camera and said I was there because the Bela Dona band was playing.

     I knew that Sweet Cherie was Chuck Brown's keyboard player. In order to get to Chuck Brown I had to show him something. Showing him pictures of the Nighthawks and the Slickee Boys wasn't going to mean anything, so I had to develop some Go-Go cred.

     I went and shot the bands that Chuck Brown band members had, so that I could bring something relevant to Chuck and his manager Tom Goldfogle. I did that and within several months I was one of Chuck's official photographers and photographed the last year of his life.

     Tom Goldfogle, when I've told that story before, has told me that they weren't looking at my photographic skills. I was like, "Oh, you weren't?" He told me they were trying to figure out if I was cool enough to hang out with them. At first I was disappointed, but then I thought, "Is that a better compliment?" It's a compliment nonetheless, but I like to think that it was my photo skills. Now I also like to think that it was cool.

    One of the things about the Chuck Brown scene, the people around Chuck Brown, is that everybody's cool. It's a very family scene back there. Chuck, when he was alive, there was a large number of people on the guest list. Those folks are the Go-Go family.

Brian:   Got it, that family vibe. You've talked a lot about photography and some of the stuff you're doing, what do you do in your personal time outside of Locally Grown, and the music stuff, and the job thing? Do you have other hobbies too?

Chip Py:   Yeah. I'm a fisherman, I'm a picker.

Brian:   A picker, what does that mean?

Chip Py:   Ever see the show American Pickers?

Brian:   If I haven't, what does that mean?

Chip Py:   It's a show on History Channel where two guys drive around in a truck through the countryside buying antiques out of barns and sell them and flip them for cash.

Brian:   Okay, I'm following you.

Chip Py:   My father was a picker. Part of the way in which I make my living is I do work for Harmony Rocket Estate Sales where we, when somebody passes away, we go in the house and sell dead's peoples stuff real quick for cheap.

     I have a dog. I love my dog, go to the dog park. Thrift store, I go to the thrift store, I love thrifting.

Brian:   What's your dog's name? What kind of dog is it?

Chip Py:   My dog's name is Bebop.

Brian:   Awesome. Imagine that, you're a music guy and you named your dog Bebop.

Chip Py:   When I first found out that the definition of bebop was when people started soloing when they wanted to, how they wanted to, and all the time. I said, "I have to have a dog named Bebop."

     When I went to the pound after my dog Pepper had died and saw Bebop, which is the dog that has every different type of breed inside that dog depending on how you look at it.

Brian:   A good mutt, huh?

Chip Py:   That is Bebop.

Brian:   That is Bebop, that's amazing. One favorite question that I love to ask; if you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be?

Chip Py:   One piece of advice for photographers?

Brian:   In general, you only get time for one.

Chip Py:   I'll tell you what I've got. What I like about my show is that it crosses genres. If you're a rockabilly guy, go to a Go-Go show. If you're a Go-Go person, go to a punk show. We have so many different music scenes in DC and nobody seems to cross through the genres.

    What I like about where my camera and where my show takes me is that every time I get to go find out about something new that we have right here in DC, right inside the Beltway, there's so much here and there's so much to explore.

    A lot of the people stay right within their genres and have their five, six, seven, maybe ten bands that they listen to. Jump out of your genre, that's what I say.

Brian:   I love it, and it's so true. On DC Music Rocks we've got the local music calendar, which is all the genres. On the show we cover a swath of all across the genres, so I hope you do check out. We've tried to put it in one place so you can find it, but I hope you check out more genres. That's such a good point.

Chip Py:   You want to see some genres that are outside of your genre, go to locallygrowndc.com.

Brian:   There it is. You lead me right into my final question, you're brilliant sir. If they want to find out more about you and the cool stuff you're doing, locallygrowndc.com.

Chip Py:   Locallygrowndc.com.

Brian:   Anywhere else that you tend to do a lot? Are you social media or other things?

Chip Py:   Do we have time to talk about, inside Locally Grown I did an episode called Funk Up the Grass. Can we talk about that now or should we?

Brian:   If we've got a minute, we got to jump back into some music here. Talk quickly about it if you can.

Chip Py:   One of the episodes I did, I put together an episode called Funk Up The Grass where I brought in four bluegrass musicians and three funk musicians. They arrived at my house and had to create five bluegrass songs with a funky beat to them. Not only did they have to create them, then we had to perform them in The Yarden.

     The city paper did an article about it. It's interesting because everybody thinks they're different, but you put people in the room with music involved and it really brings people together. It's how you can really celebrate your differences and create something unique.

Brian:   That's it. That's locallygrowndc.com. Look at the episodes and the name of the episode again is?

Chip Py:   Funk Up The Grass.

Brian:   Funk Up The Grass.

Chip Py:   I also had an alt-country band, Ty Braddock's alt-country band and I brought in the Go-Go singer Mz Laydee. They hit some old country songs with a soulful flavor to it.

4/10/18 - Special Guest: Justin Trawick

Thanks to Justin Trawick for hanging out with us in the studio this week!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. ***G.U.N (Give up on the now), by Radar (Rock, Dance-Rock)
  2. The Bright Side, by Justin Trawick and the Common Good (Bluegrass, Rock)
  3. ***Barista Boyfriend, by Louisa Hall (Folk, Indie Pop)
  4. ***City, Sing to Me, by Blue Plains (Indie, Alternative)
  5. My Father's Gun, by Justin Jones (Rock, Folk)

***The first time we've played this artist for you on the show, & a new artist profile added to our DC Artist Database!  There's new artists every week!

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


ANNOUNCEMENTS

HELP US REACH THE GO-GO BANDS!
We love Go-go and now have a page in our DC Artist Database dedicated exclusively to the Go-go.  We have Rare Essence and The Chuck Brown Band on there, and we’ve heard from the JOGO Project. We’re trying to connect with EU, Trouble Funk, Junk Yard Band and the other ones we're missing to get them added.  We’ve emailed and messaged them but they haven’t responded. If you’re connected to any actual members of those bands, would you email introduce us to them or forward this!? It’s a Go-go town, we’d love to add them to our site!  We just need them to click on the "musicians click here" button on our home page www.dcmusicrocks.com and fill out the form on our site one time and we’ll be all set going forward! Thanks for your help connecting us with our love!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/gogo


NEW MUSIC RELEASES

Round About - Coming Into Focus (11 Song Rock Album, RIYL Barenaked Ladies)


NEW VIDEOS

Aaron Abernathy - Generation (R&B, RIYL Prince)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SxpttD-6oGw

Lesson Zero - Not That Bad (Rock, RIYL The Eagles)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_JuQMh4KKPU


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Here’s just a few highlights for the coming week, be sure to check out the calendar for the full list of all the upcoming shows!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Sat Apr 14
--Emancipation Day Concert @ Freedom Plaza by Metro Center featuring Rare Essence and more! (Go-Go, RIYL Chuck Brown)
--Melodime @ Milkboy Arthouse in College Park, MD (Rock, RIYL Zac Brown Band)

Sun Apr 15
--Dior Ashley Brown and Band @ Anacostia Arts Center as part of Flower Power Event (Hip Hop, RIYL Queen Latifah)

Tues Apr 17
--Olivia Mancini & The Mates @ Jammin Java (Pop, RIYL Jenny Lewis)

Wed Apr 18
--Aztec Sun @ Wolf Trap (Funk, RIYL Earth Wind & Fire)
--Eli Lev & Emma G @ Milkboy Arthouse (Indie/Pop, RIYL Mumford & Sons, Adele)


Patreon

Do you like what we're doing?  Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **Music 4 The Revolution (Abu Jibran)**


We're Looking For Sponsors

We're looking for local businesses to sponsor us!  Know One?  Would you introduce us to them?



Justin Trawick

Video - Bio - Links - Transcript

Justin's Bio:

Justin-Trawick-Bio.jpg

Justin Trawick and The Common Good’s debut record, “The Riverwash EP”, exemplifies the raw emotional live sound Trawick and the band have cultivated over the years playing in clubs and festivals up and down the East Coast. With instrumentation consisting of acoustic guitar, upright bass, fiddle, mandolin, and pedal steel, the band’s live performance plays fast and loose with the “Americana” genre, performing heartfelt ballads followed by raucous bluegrass melodies and even moments of hip hop verses. Written by DC based songwriter Justin Trawick, “The Riverwash EP” introduces the listener to Trawick’s unique brand storytelling with five original songs about love, loss, longing, resilience, and time pulling heartstrings of listeners young and old. Adam Levy (Norah Jones, Tracy Chapman) guest performs on guitar during “All the Places That I’ve Been”, a song inspired by Trawick’s ninety-seven year old grandmother and her stories of the World War II generation. Finally, the album closes with the band’s unique take on “Wonderwall” by Oasis, a track sure to trick the audience into thinking they’re listening to another Trawick original. 

Justin Trawick has been performing in the Washington DC area and along the East Coast since 2006, citing musical influences like Bob Schneider, The Tallest Man on Earth, G. Love, Old Crow Medicine Show, and David Gray. In June of 2015, Trawick released his first single, “Goodbye”, under the band name "Justin Trawick and the Common Good”; written about the search for direction and belonging in a world that constantly feels one step ahead of you. Trawick has performed for TedxEast in NYC at the City Winery, TedxPennsylvaniaAvenue in DC at the Newseum, and has opened for over 30 national acts including Suzanne Vega, Wyclef Jean, Brett Dennen, Blues Traveler, Enter The Haggis, Bob Schneider, and Edwin McCain, and shared bills with Dr. Dogg and The Avett Brothers. In February of 2014, Trawick won “Song of the Year” at the Washington Area Music Awards for his song “All the Places That I’ve Been," which can be downloaded on iTunes as a single along with his five other solo records and EPs. Founder of the nationally touring show “The 9 Songwriter Series” and co-founder of “The Circus Life Podcast" with guests such as Kevin Eubanks, Chris Thomas King, Ernie Halter, Yarn, and Snuffy Walden, Trawick has built a brand that extends far beyond his home base in DC. For more information, please visit http://justintrawick.com.

Full Band - Photo Credit - Martin Radigan 1.JPG

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:     I'm DC music rocks we are shining a spotlight on the great songs, and the incredible people behind the DC regions local music scene. Justin Trawick has been a staple in the scene for as long as I have been in DC and probably more. I will never forget the moment where, my bad was starting out and yours was one of the ones that get tossed around with DC music quite a lot. Your one of those names that I have known for a while. So, working with you, and gotten advice and guidance from you and your thoughts on different things. The local music world connects with Justin. So, I have been a fan for a while, and its truly an honor and I am excited. Thanks for being with us here today man.

Justin Trawick:     Was it you and me that had a 45 minute conversation in my parent's parking lot on the phone, years ago before you started doing this show.

Brian:     I am laughing so hard because I definitely, if it was in your parent's parking lot I wouldn't have known because it was on the phone. It could have been, we were talking about the business. This was even before this, it think that was a Fellowcraft conversation.

Justin Trawick:     But I told you that you had a good broadcast voice. Do you remember that.

Brian:     I do, now that you bring that up.

Justin Trawick:     And here you are, successful, you own multiple beach homes.

Brian:     Oh stop it, this is not about me and my beach homes. Thanks though.   Alright so lets talk about you. Now first and foremost the name Justin Trawick and the common good. And the common good what is that.

Justin Trawick:     I am from Virginia, I grew up in Louisburg and went to college in Fayetteville, Virginia at Longwood University and I live in Arlington now. I am a Virginian probably more technically a northern Virginian but I am a Virginian. So when i was looking for a band name, I really wanted to somehow involve Virginia in the band name. The common wealth was already taken, Justin Trawick and the Common wealth. So looked up Common Wealth in Wikipedia and on Wikipedia the definition of common Wealth, I would have to look at it again but the definition of common wealth in Wikipedia has doing something for the common good. So Justin Trawick and the common Good is a subtle reference to Virginia.

Brian:     Oh my god, a little tribute to Virginia. I love it. You said you were in Louisburg, when did you, you’re in Arlington now?

Justin Trawick:     I live in Arlington, just down the street from here. We can get drunk and stumble home to my place and watch Netflix.

Brian:     It sounds like such a fun evening I got to be honest. It really does. How long has it been since you came to Arlington.

Justin Trawick:     I been in Arlington since 2006, I was commuting back and forth from my parents house to regular day jobs for two years after graduating college in 04. Then I moved into an apartment building down the street, of which is in about 45 days is going to ceased to exist. I got a letter from my landlord that says that your building is going to be demolished. It is no longer going to be there. So i have to figure out my life now.

Brian:     Okay. You got some figuring to do. My god. In regards to figuring your life out, I wanted to ask you when did you decide to make the decision to do music full time. This is a full-time thing for you.

Justin Trawick:     Yes, my last job ended in 2008.

Brian:     What was it that pushed you to the edge that made you say okay I am just going to commit to this.

Justin Trawick:     I got laid off.

Brian:     Okay. I was like I could find another job or this music thing could work if I give it ago.

Justin Trawick:     My parents defiantly wanted your first option, they wanted me to get a job. Come on, my parents were the people who, my dad had two jobs for his entire adulthood, my mother had one. That's our greatest generation, that a baby boomer generation thing. I always wanted to do music full time, I think I am actually happy that I was laid off. If I had not been laid off, I don't think that I would have had the guts to quit a job that was giving me money to show up somewhere. It's everyone's dream, it's really hard to just say I don't want money just handed to me anymore, I am going to go do my own thing. So when that choice is made for me, I kind of in about a week or two of some thinking had realized without really knowing it. I amassed enough of business of bars that I was playing, and a little bit of notoriety already that I actually could afford to pay my rent, my health insurance, my car insurance, even going on terrible dates and stuff like that on music and DC is a really great place to do that, there is a lot of money to be made as an artist as opposed to anywhere else in the country.

     The government is not going out of business, there is a lot of organizations that are spending money on events. I am a working musician here and I go to places like New York and I try to get seen.

Brian:     You are involved in a lot of things, not just Justin Trawick and the Common Good. You play show, and I heard people talk about the nine. Talk about the other stuff that you are doing.

Justin Trawick:     The nine was right before my job ended, I was attempting to come up with a way for me and my friends to get in better venues and to get in front of more people. Some sort of collective, at the time there were two different national tours happening. There was one called the Hotel Café tour, which is Hotel café is a really famous [inaudible 00:05:49] venue in Hollywood, California. Of people that become famous from playing there. The same way people are becoming famous for playing at Rockwood, or the living room in New York. There is also something called ten out of Tenn. Which is ten people out of Tennessee, national specifically. These two tours are doing things that the Hotel Café tour were touring as all these people hanging out at Hotel Café, all friend were like why don't we just tour together. Ten out of Tenn was all these friends, big artists from Nashville touring as a big collective group. One of the best shows I seen happening was at Iota, which again if your listening we are in Arlington, Virginia. Iota is now a club that is defunked just down the street from us, it is where I got started. Very sad that is gone, one of the best shows I saw was a Ten out of Tenn. So with the Nine, I pitched the town of buyer Steve Lambert the DC Nine which is on the corner of u street and ninth street.

 

 You know the DC9. Hey I'm looking to do a collective kind of shows, a unique kind of show structure. What if we call it the Nine at DC9. Sometimes I wish the place was called DC six, Dc Seven cause nine is a lot. But now it's like I've committed to the branding at this point, this year is my tenth year. This year we are actually planning a very big tenth anniversary show, I am talking to some of the bigger venues but I am really excited about it but the Nine has been great. Rachel Planton, which everyone knows is on the radio now has done it, Jimmy Haha from Jimmy's Chicken track has done it. I mean Adam Levy who is the guitar player for Nora Jones. The guy who plays the sweet guitar licks. Give me one reason by Tracy Chapman which you always here when you are shopping for pasta or any kind of grocery store. We have had some big people on it, and I am attempting to try and expand it.

Brian:     That's amazing. When you are not doing all this stuff what are you hobbies, or interests. You mention Netflix earlier, does that mean you’re a Netflix nut, what do you do in your free time.

Justin Trawick:     I play racquetball, do you play racquetball Brian because I am looking for racquetball partners.

Brian:     I totally used to play racquetball.

Justin Trawick:     Like used to in college?

Brian:     Like meaning in college, or when I was growing up. Meaning I totally know the rules of racquetball and can play.

Justin Trawick:     Were you good?

Brian:     No but...

Justin Trawick:     What did you call yourself a sportsman?

Brian:     No, I am a recreational person. I don't think I would call it sports with the level that I played at. That's to say. For you, so there's racquetball and what else.

Justin Trawick:     I mean I do like my stories. Which is kind of like what women say about their soap operas but I do like watching Netflix. I really do.

Brian:     When you say I like your stories, what stories are you referring to. Like certain shows.

Justin Trawick:     Well no , like did you never watch All My Children when you came home from kindergarten with your parents or with your mom specifically. Unless your dad really liked soap operas.

Brian:     No, I can’t say that I did.

Justin Trawick:     No, me either.

Brian:     I escaped that apparently. Sadly I missed that from my childhood. I have been deprived.

Justin Trawick:     So I love a good dramatic television show and I think that is because the fact that I am also an emotional songwriter. I say that as a joke like my stories, because I heard people talk about watching soap operas and they call them their stories. Truthfully, I love a good story. I really do. This is sad, but this is true. I can figure out a way to cry during a commercial. If they told the commercial really well.

Brian:     That's amazing. Alright. In some time in your life I want you to watch television with Justin Trawick, because that sounds like maybe a Superbowl, with what they do with the commercials. It would be good. Tears would be involved it would be like an Emmy winning performance I'm sure.

Justin Trawick:     We will just put mute when the game happens.

Brian:     My favorite question to ask though, and I definitely want to ask you this is if you can offer one piece of advice what would it be.

Justin Trawick:     In terms of what.

Brian:     However you want to answer it. I am purposely leaving it open for you, it's a blank canvas, what advice.

Justin Trawick:     I would probably say see the sunlight.

Brian:     Say more.

Justin Trawick:     I mean get out, it is extremely easy especially when you work for yourself. It is extremely easy to live in your cave, to live in your own world and to just forget that anything else exists. It's very easy to not socialize yourself if no one else is doing it for you. When my last day job ended, i kind of really had to learn that. I didn't learn it the hard way but I kind of started off with a handicap of really not understanding it. So again, I very often at times Brian do not see the sunlight. I can be at home, I can be working or something like that and suddenly it's six o'clock and I'm like okay I am going to play a gig.

Brian:     You didn't leave the house until after it already had gone down.

Justin Trawick:     No you have got to have hobbies, so I play racquetball because I meet up with my friends, I get to hear what's going on in their lives. Then I get to go back in my own world.

Brian:     Alright get out and see the sun I like that. That's good advice. Okay one more time for those folks that want to find out more about you and all the stuff you have going on where do they go?

Justin Trawick:     My brand new website, JustinTrawick.com. There is videos, there is t-shirts and all kinds of music.

4/3/18 - Special Guest: Lindsay, Talent Buyer for Black Cat

Thanks to Lindsay from the Black Cat for hanging out with us in the studio this week!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. ***Stronger, by Juxt (Hard Rock)
  2. Stand Up, by Heather Mae (Pop, Singer-Songwriter)
  3. The Imagineers, by Crys Matthews (Folk, Americana)
  4. ***Snitch Jacket, by Two Inch Astronaut (Rock)
  5. Skim Milk, by Flasher (Rock)

***The first time we've played this artist for you on the show, & a new artist profile added to our DC Artist Database!  There's new artists every week!

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


ANNOUNCEMENTS

DC’s Emancipation Day celebration is Sat Apt 14, Free music and entertainment all day, plus parade and fireworks, downtown at freedom plaza.  Hope you check it out! https://emancipation.dc.gov/sites/default/files/dc/sites/emancipation/publication/attachments/Emancipation%20Day%202018_flyer_v5-01.pdf


DCMR is looking for help.  
Social Media and Website Content Specialist - 100% virtual/remote position.  5-10 hours/week.
    Must be interested in music, local music knowledge a plus but not required.  Experience with simple web design such as Squarespace, Mailchimp, Social Media, and Hootsuite are a plus.  Motivated to take on more also a plus. This isn’t a high paying position but if you’re looking for a fun side regular side hustle that you can do from home, this may be a great fit.  Must be available to complete a few hours of work sometime Friday-Sun, and Wednesday Morning-Midday.
     Interested? Know someone who would be? Send an email to dcmusicrocks@gmail.com and include a paragraph or two outlining how you/they relate to the above.


NEW MUSIC RELEASES

  • Bencoolen - In The End (Funk Single, RIYL Dave Matthews Band)

  • Kenny Sway - Kissing On The Moon (R&B Single, RIYL Pharrell or D’Angelo)

  • Da Flame - God Answers Prayers (Gospel Single, RIYL Gospel)

  • Oh He Dead - Blood In The Water (Indie, 3 Song EP, RIYL Alabama Shakes)


NEW VIDEOS

Two Dragons & A Cheetah - Five By Five
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qRRDc8QK9nA

Our ‘DC Artists 2018 Tiny Desk Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70mSpEqXgQVvD6mR7yxbdyuV

Our ‘DC Artists Official Music Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70kU0_uB-sdviWajkbzi2Akr


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Here’s just a few highlights for the coming week, be sure to check out the calendar for the full list of all the upcoming shows!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Fri Apr 6
--Christos DC @ Tropicalia on U St (Reggae, RIYL Bob Marley)
--Two Dragons and a Cheetah & Allthebestkids @ Red Panda House (Pop/Rock/HipHop, RIYL Alanis Morrisette/Notorious B.I.G.)
--Beanstalk Library & Throwing Plates @ Pearl Street Warehouse (Rock, RIYL Neil Young/Norah Jones)
--Backbeat Underground & Aaron Abernathy @ RNR Hotel (Funk/R&B, RIYL The Funk Ark/Prince/Marvin Gaye)

Sat Apr 7
--Petalpalooza, All Day Festival @ The Wharf
--VA listeners, Brian’s drumming with Fellowcraft @ World of Beer in Ashburn.  Come enjoy some originals and covers, grab a drink, and take a selfie! (Rock, RIYL Jet/The Pixies)

Sun Apr 8
--Broke Royals @ Union Stage (Rock, RIYL The Killers)

Wed Apr 11
--Chris Cassaday Concoction @ Gypsy Sally’s (Pop/Funk/Rock, RIYL Dave Matthews/Sublime)


Patreon

Do you like what we're doing?  Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **Music 4 The Revolution (Abu Jibran)**


We're Looking For Sponsors

We're looking for local businesses to sponsor us!  Know One?  Would you introduce us to them?



Lindsay - Talent Buyer for Black Cat

Video - Bio - Links - Transcript

Lindsay's Bio:

Lindsay Smyers_Black Cat.jpg

Lindsay is the talent buyer at Black Cat. She got her start booking benefit shows in high school for the American Cancer Society. This sparked a lifelong interest in booking shows that have a positive social impact. Black Cat has been an independent bastion in the Washington DC nightlife scene for 25 years. Lindsay has had a major role in the office of Black Cat during the most recent five years in the club’s storied history. Lindsay is a headstrong individual who values ethics and principles over monetary gain when it comes to booking. You can also find her in the garden, at a pottery wheel, or rolling for initiative with her D&D party all while daydreaming about her next major crafting or work project.

 

 

Black Cat.jpg

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:     On D.C. Music Rocks, we're shinning a spotlight on the great songs, artists and incredible people to keep you informed about your local music community. Lindsay is the talent buyer at Black Cat. She got her start booking benefit shows in high school for the American Cancer Society and this sparked a lifelong interest in booking shows that have a positive social impact. Black Cat has been an independent bastion in the Washington, D.C. nightlife scene for 25 years. Lindsay has had a major role in the office at the Black Cat during most of the recent 5 years and in the clubs storied history. So Lindsay, as a headstrong individual who values ethics and principles over monetary gain when it comes to booking, which is an amazing phrase to hear to come out about you.

    I first came across Lindsay because Fellow Craft has played shows at Black Cat and I certainly have heard of her for so long. I've been a fan of the work that you're doing and the club for so long, so it is a treat to have you sitting here with me. Thanks for being here.

Lindsay:     Thank you. Thank you for inviting me.

Brian:     Now, tell us about Black Cat. It's the story ... Why is it called the Black Cat? Or is there a story there? Talk about the history.

Lindsay:     I could tell you probably a better story of why the ... You can write a check to the Black Cat or to Circle One Productions.

Brian:     Oh that's the proper business name?

Lindsay:     Right.

Brian:     Yeah, where does that come from?

Lindsay:     Circle One Productions is a joke that Dante [Frondo 00:01:25] our owner has ... Dante's inferno, the first circle of hell, is really where that comes from, so the Black Cat itself is probably more of just that same ... I don't think there's a specific black cat. I do know that the name has been in his family for years. There was a restaurant in the '20's that was called the Black Cat that has been carried down, so the original story for the name, I'm not sure how far back you'd actually have to go to get it.

Brian:     Interesting. So if you're ever at the Black Cat and Dante is there, ask him. Maybe he might know.

Lindsay:     Or yeah, his ancestors might, yeah.

Brian:     Or his ancestors, right. It's buried in the history books somewhere.

Lindsay:     It's been for a very, very long time.

Brian:     And you mentioned the club has a hundred year history, so where does it- ...

Lindsay:     The building.

Brian:     The building does? Tell us more about that history part. You said it's been a part of the culture in D.C., can you share a little bit more about that in terms of how it's connected to the scene? Or some of that specialness, in your opinion.

Lindsay:     The Black Cat? Sure. When Dante opened the place, he was in his early 20's. It's been around for a long time and a lot of his reason for opening it was to create a space for the community for the music that he wanted to play and wanted to share, to be there. So his perspective has always been really great for us in having him still be around. That's kind of one of the things that makes the mom-and-pop business so special, I guess, to the community is that it does focus on things like, "Hey, is this something we want to do? Is this something that would benefit our community? People that we care about." Definitely want to keep the lights on, but that's also a reason why we do want to get smaller, we do want to not kind of fall into the hype machine if you will and kind of stick to our guns and actually try to benefit that community and keep things on the lower side.

Brian:     Wow, I love that. I'm such a fan of the Black Cat, and if you've ever been to the Black Cat, where is the Black Cat?

Lindsay:     It's on 14th street, between S and T. It's actually on the same block, if you remember the old Black Cat, it's the same block, it's just a couple doors down. So I joke, this upcoming renovation is our next iteration, our next Cat life, right.

Brian:     There's nine lives that a cat has and we're getting through some of 'em.

Lindsay:     Yeah, yeah.

Brian:     Oh I like that. Now, for you then, how did you get hooked in with the Black Cat?

Lindsay:     Oh, man I remember going as a young-un. Their only age venue and then kind of entering that community then, but working there when I was 21, I moved back to D.C. to help my sister out who was going through a hard time and ended up staying and I had a good friend named Alex who played a lot of the shows we mentioned earlier back when we were a teenagers together and he was like, "Oh yeah, I started working door almost 8 years ago at this point now." And started working the kitchen and then started working for Vicki who taught me ... Her and Dante taught me everything I know and yeah, that's I guess how that happened.

Brian:     Holy.

Lindsay:     The good ole fashion way.

Brian:     Right, so you got connected in. And that was how long ago now? You've been ... We said five years?

Lindsay:     Eight with the club.

Brian:     Holy smokes.

Lindsay:     Yeah.

Brian:     That's amazing. And especially these days, people don't tend to keep jobs for eight years so it's kind of amazing that you're ... Goes to credit the great family vibe and the love that the Black Cat creates.

Lindsay:     It is. It's really special for me. As someone who moved around every two years growing up, I think the idea of community is something that is a beautiful thing in this world, it's cool.

Brian:     Yeah. And you moved every two years because dad was military?

Lindsay:     Yeah, my dad was military, which brought us to ... He worked at the Pentagon when I was 15 to 18, which is when you can reference those, we call them "die cancer die fest" at Cancer Fest and those would be back in that day from 15 to 18 in Northern Virginia would have been the area for that.

Brian:     That's so cool. And you know what? I have the same story, my dad was military and he was stationed at the Pentagon and I was here as a kid too.

Lindsay:     We're many of us around the area.

Brian:     Right. Absolutely, it's that connection. Now talk about you on the personal side, so outside of the Black Cat, hobbies? What do you do in your free time? Free time, what is that?

Lindsay:     But I have it. So many things, depending on how I'm feeling that free time. One of the things right now that I'm so excited for is April 15th is our last day of frost. I'm a big gardener so I have been germinating since January and I have ... I was joking, I think I have about 85 plants and only room for 28 of them, so if anyone needs any plants, hey let me know. I'm trying to get rid of some. It's a good news when everything germinates but that and I'm building a pottery studio in the garden this year to hopefully bring some pottery skills back into the backyard. And I'm a big hand ... Crochet, knitting, sewing.

Brian:     Wow.

Lindsay:     I like to create my own things.

Brian:     Total artsy side.

Lindsay:     Yeah I guess so.

Brian:     So you got the creative side that's not necessarily making music but it's making other art pieces and stuff like that.

Lindsay:     Making clothes or fill in the blanks. I have a nephew on the way so making a lot of baby booties right now.

Brian:     There you go. Excellent. Oh god, love those nephews. Absolutely. Now, talk about the funniest moment in the history of Black cat. What comes to mind?

Lindsay:     I mean, this one was hard for me because I find myself dealing with either things that are tragically hilarious or things that are coincidentally what? Oh my gosh how funny. There's nothing really that's, "Oh ha, ha, ha that happened. That's hilarious." So, one story that came to mind is just this funny moment, we had The Wallflowers play and man it was not the right year for them. They had come back and we were pushing the show, it was a great show in the end. It worked out fine, most things do, that's why ... Everything's fine in the end, it's just all the stress leading up to it.

    And I remember, we typically don't have many runners, we're not that big and so I had to pick up Jacob Dillon that night and as we're driving back to the club he's getting ready, we're just chatting about whatever in the car on the way to the club, it's about a five minute drive and I just chuckled and will never forget the moment I looked down and realized that there was only one headlight and it just stuck with me really hard. It was a good moment.

Brian:     Oh my god. And if you didn't catch that, think about it, do a little googling and see if you catch what she just did there 'cause oh it was so good. I love it. Now, if you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be?

Lindsay:     To be honest, I feel like a lot in the industry you have people that are trying to either convince you of something or to explain something in a way of seeming very big if it comes to ego or pride, or whatever it is. But the best thing I can find in this industry to deal with is being honest and having people ... Will respect you a lot more if you are upfront about what you can deliver or where you're- ...

Brian:     Does that have to do with when a band says how many people they can bring? Or what else are you referring to there?

Lindsay:     I guess most of the time dealing with, "Hey can I bring fire inside?" Like no, "Oh, oh please?" Or do it anyway, or things like that. It's just ... or "Why?" 'Cause of this thing, it's just easier I feel like when you're honest with people and even when it comes to shows that maybe don't do as well or shows that do way above what you would think, everyone can get their high and low points and I guess about being honest with yourself and honest with what you're doing is always gonna kinda come out on top on the end in my opinion.

Brian:     Yeah. Got it. That makes perfect sense. And actually, while we're talking about that, I was just curious, when a band emails you and says, "Hey, we want to play at the Black Cat." What do you look at? What are you thinking about?

Lindsay:     Oh man. So many things. Well, the first thing right, is hey does this fit? Does this fit our genre?

Brian:     What is that genre?

Lindsay:     Variations of alternative rock basically.

Brian:     Okay.

Lindsay:     Right? So that's where ... And now genres are so ... They just bled into each other so much that it's really hard to kinda ... It's one of the tough games that I play constantly.

Brian:     Sure.

Lindsay:     And local is a little different 'cause we want to maintain that community. I want to mention Heather May and Chris, are more singer, song writer types, which you won't typically find, those kinds of artists on the more national scale come through, but locally of course we would want to cater to that more. So, if it fits the genre, if we have the date right? 'Cause coordinating that calendar with two rooms, it's a lot to try to figure out a lot of, "Hey how long can you wait? What do you need to do?" And a lot of back and forth happens before you come to a conclusion.

Brian:     Got it. So the genre and the date, and the potentially how many people they can bring.

Lindsay:     And it's like hey how many are in your band? Do you have a 15 person band? 'Cause the back stage ...

Brian:     Right it's not big enough for five people.

Lindsay:     There's just so many question that go into it, so a lot of the hoping we can do with the new room on the third floor is a real simple setup. Hey, plug in, play and cut down on the expenses to go back into the local community, which we'll do hopefully. That's the plan.

Brian:     That's awesome. I love it. And one more time, if they want to find out more about what's happening at Black Cat, where do they go?

Lindsay:    Blackcatdc.com.

Brian:     That's the place.

 

3/27/18 - Special Guest: Mystery Friends

Thanks to Mystery Friends for hanging out with us in the studio this week!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. Voodoo Woman, by Stone Driver (Hard Rock, Rock)
  2. Keflavik, by Mystery Friends (Indie, Dance Rock)
  3. ***Aimless Kid, by Queue (Indie, Indie Rock)
  4. Fade, by Lavender (Indie,Indie Pop)
  5. ***Graves, by Kid Brother (Rock/Folk)

***The first time we've played this artist for you on the show, & a new artist profile added to our DC Artist Database!  There's new artists every week!

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


ANNOUNCEMENTS

We need your help supporting WERA 96.7FM, a big supporter of the local music scene in DC, & the station where the live version of our show airs!  Arlington County is planning to cut funding for the station by 20%, which would gut the station staff, drive up costs to the station’s community considerably, and potentially even cause the loss of the station itself.
https://www.arlingtonmedia.org/about/proposed-fy-19-county-budget-catastrophic-aim

The county board will vote on the proposed budget on April 21st. Here’s how we need your help before the vote:

1) If you live in Arlington, or know someone who does, forward them this link and sign our petition - Urging the County Board to restore AIM's funding.
https://www.change.org/p/arlington-county-board-urge-the-arlington-county-board-to-act-to-restore-arlington-independent-media-s-funding

2) Share Your Feedback on Arlington's FY 2019 Proposed Budget - This county survey asks Arlington residents to give feedback on the proposed budget. Must be completed by April 9, 2018
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/FY19BudgetFeedback

3) Write your County Board members - countyboard@arlingtonva.us - Tell them you want AIM's funding restored!!  Sample letter here - https://www.arlingtonmedia.org/about/proposed-fy-19-county-budget-catastrophic-aim/sample-letter-county-board-stop-aim-budget-cuts

4) Speak with a County Board member at an Open Door Monday. Open to all Arlington residents.  No appointment is necessary to talk one-on-one with a County Board member on any topic. Mondays, 7 - 9PM, at locations around the Arlington. See schedule below:
Open Door Monday at Langston Brown Community Center - Monday, April 2nd https://countyboard.arlingtonva.us/open-door-mondays/


NEW MUSIC RELEASES

  • Stone Driver - Voodoo Woman (Single - Hard Rock - RIYL AC/DC)

  • Time Is Fire - Stories Untold (3 Song EP - Hard Rock - RIYL Gang of Four)

Our 2018 New Releases by DC Artists’ Spotify Playlist:
https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/7kbMQzbrQPisoJq5A76V3k


NEW VIDEOS

The Split Seconds - Come To Mary https://youtu.be/JdZ4VhPHfA4

Thievery Corporation - Depth of My Soul ft Shana Halligan
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q3PyhMO171E

2018 Tiny Desk Contest Videos By Your Local Artist (See Youtube Playlist below)

  • Sub-Radio
  • Lavender
  • Crys Matthews
  • Nardo Lilly
  • Justin Trawick
  • Thaylobleu
  • Aztec Sun
  • Near Northeast
  • Skribe
  • Leo & Cygnus
  • Flo Anito
  • Mystery Friends

Our ‘DC Artists 2018 Tiny Desk Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70mSpEqXgQVvD6mR7yxbdyuV

Our ‘DC Artists Official Music Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70kU0_uB-sdviWajkbzi2Akr


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Here’s just a few highlights for the coming week, be sure to check out the calendar for the full list of all the upcoming shows!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

(RIYL = Recommended If You Like)
Fri Mar 30
-Queue @ Black Cat on 14th St (Spacy Indie Vibe, RIYL The Nationals, The Cranberries)
-Bencoolen & FeelFree @ Gypsy Sally’s (Reggae, RIYL Red Hot Chili Peppers, SOJA, Steely Dan)
-Oh He Dead @ DC9 Nightclub (RIYL Alabama Shakes, Amy Winehouse, EP Release Show)

Sat Mar 31
-Lionize & Tomato Dodgers @ Rock & Roll Hotel on H St (Hard Rock & Funk, RIYL Metallica & Cake)

Sun Apr 1
-Rare Essence @ Society Lounge in Silver Spring (Go-Go, RIYL Chuck Brown

Tue Apr 3
-Rachel Levitin @ Pearl Street Warehouse (Rock, RIYL Sheryl Crow)

Thu Apr 5
-Chris Cassaday & Sol Roots @ Union Stage (Funk Blues, RIYL Eric Lindell, The Wood Brothers, Dave Matthews, Sublime)
-FuzzQueen & Nah. @ DC9 (Rock Indie, RIYL PJ Harvey, Waxahachie, Courtney Barnett, Hospitality)

Mark Your Calendar FUTURE shows discussed during the show:

Apr 23
Mystery Friends @ DC9

May 26
Stone Driver, Black Dog Prowl, and Fellowcraft (Brian's Band) at Union Stage
Epic Hard Rock Show - RIYL: AC/DC, Metallica, Guns & Roses,   


Patreon

Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **Music 4 The Revolution (Abu Jibran)**



Mystery Friends

Video - Bio - Links - Transcript

Mystery Friends's Bio:

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Mystery Friends is a band rooted in the DC-music tradition while forging its own path forward. Since forming in 2016, the band finds its sound from a variety of influences, but they all fit together like a weird, wonderful puzzle. The band has been likened to Chvrches and Talking Heads, among others, but never looks to copy someone else’s sound. Combining powerful vocals, angular guitars, woozy synths, and a funky rhythm section, Mystery Friends makes moderately danceable rock music for a time when people need a reason to dance.

Links:
https://www.mysteryfriendsband.com/
https://www.instagram.com/mysteryfriends/
https://www.facebook.com/mysteryfriendsband/
https://twitter.com/mysteryfriends_
https://open.spotify.com/artist/1nkamhZ86zDvuB1HB3Wq8y
https://mysteryfriends.bandcamp.com/

 

Press Photo.jpg
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INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:     On DC Music Rocks we're shining a spotlight on the great songs, artists, and incredible people behind the DC region's local music scene. Mystery Friends formed in 2016 and finds its sound from a variety of influences that all fit together like a weird wonderful puzzle. The band has been likened to Chvrches and Talking Heads among others and combining powerful vocals from Abby over there with angular guitars, woozy sense, and a funky rhythm section.

     Mystery friends makes moderately danceable rock, which we established means only extreme dancing sometimes, regular dancing other times. Moderately danceable rock I love it. Moderately danceable rock music for a time when people need a reason to dance. So and I first came across these guys, God it was probably a couple years ago. I've been following you guys for a long time since the first EP came out and I've been such a fan so for me it's a fanboy moment for me where I get to say thank you guys so much for being here. This is really cool.

Dave:     Well thank you.

Brian:     Absolutely. Now so for those folks who haven't heard it what is it that makes you guys special do you think? I hear all the time that like, "Oh we have great energy." Or something but what else, what makes you guys special or different you think?

Danny:     Reverse guitar.

Brian:     And if they don't know what a reverse guitar is what is that exactly?

Danny:     That's a guitar that you play backwards and put it into a sample pad.

Brian:     Play backwards meaning upside down and in your left hand? What does that mean?

Danny:     Yeah well that's what we tried it first.

Dave:     That's phase two.

Abby:     Yeah.

Dave:     So yeah I mean I would say part of what I think makes us unique or special would be that we take, we're a band with many influences and many, we bring a lot of different things to the table and that's could be a detriment but I think it's actually an asset because you know none of us are of the same exact musical taste and I think that ultimately that means we have like we try to write in that you know summary the combination can be interesting. You don't hear a lot of things like that because we're not all going from, "Oh I have to play like Radiohead. I have to play like whatever." Everybody has a different influence so therefore those are all represented in the music we ultimately produce.

Brian:     Got it and how did you guys come together?

Danny:     Very slowly. So I think actually the way that the name kind of works for us is that we all, so me and Dave went to high school together, but I met Robbie through his now fiancee. I met Abby through my girlfriend Kate's friend's sister. Is who Abby is. And I knew about Abby moving to DC months before she actually did and you know kind of probably scared her at a party one time when I told her I put a track on the playlist of the party that we were at. And so we kind of, yeah, so we kind of come from everywhere.

Abby:     Yeah.

Brian:     So in it, but what I'm collecting from this is that you all some how knew each other a little bit it wasn't like a Craigslist thing?

Dave:     Yeah. That's right.

Abby:     Correct. Yeah.

Danny:     Except for our drummer who's not here. Who Robbie met-

Dave:     Who was Robbie with?

Robbie:     I met his sister at-

Danny:     I met his sister at a wedding.

Robbie:     Yes.

Danny:     Yeah.

Dave:     So instead of Craigslist-

Danny:     And we needed a drummer.

Dave:     Robbie found someone at a wedding and through persuasion-

Brian:     You found someone at a wedding.

Dave:     Yeah.

Brian:     I love this combination. Holy smokes. I can't even keep track of all the things you just said but at the same time the level of connections it's like three degrees of separation from what's his name? Kevin Spacey?

Abby:     Yep.

Danny:     We probably know everybody in the DC area if-

Dave:     Yeah. Yeah.

Abby:     Somehow.

Danny:     [crosstalk 00:03:26] powers.

Abby:     Someone's connected or yeah well connected. If they're capable of something.

Brian:     That's amazing. And the name itself where does Mystery Friends come from?

Abby:     We joke 'cause it was a random name generator actually. But then we kind of landed on that and we're like that's actually really good. So-

Brian:     Now wait were you all like sitting around the name generator together at a rehearsal or did somebody find it and was like, "Hey what about this?"

Abby:     It was one of those rehearsals were I think we were let's rehearse but then it ended up being let's just eat pizza. So yeah I think there were instruments there but I don't think you can call it a rehearsal.

Brian:     So you had your phones out and you were looking on name generators and oh Mystery Friends.

Abby:     Yeah. It might've been Robbie. Yeah I don't, we had a list of like reject names and I think Mystery Friends was actually listed there and I'm like wait a minute that actually works for us. So you know all the odd connections and the friend tree that we have of how we all kind of came together so it worked out well.

Brian:     That's amazing and re-introduce yourselves real quick one more time. It's your name and what your role is in the band. Run through it for me real quick.

Abby:     Yeah Abby I'm the vocalist and the synth player.

Dave:     I'm Dave and I play guitar and synth and other stuff.

Brian:     Got it.

Danny:     And I'm Danny I play guitar and sample pad.

Brian:     Yeah.

Robbie:     Robbie here. I play bass.

Brian:     Yep and there's one more he is ...

Robbie:     Greg.

Abby:     Greg.

Brian:     Greg [crosstalk 00:04:38] he plays drums.

Abby:     Greg on the drums.

Dave:     Yeah on behalf of Greg he plays drums.

Brian:     On behalf of Greg.

Robbie:     The most mysterious of all the friends.

Brian:     Yeah I was going to say and I'm a drummer so you're the most important part and I love you man. Just so you know.

Dave:     Oh yeah. I can attest we tried playing without a drummer and I can attest that it is not as good as it sounds.

Brian:     See now you're just sucking up to me. Don't stop. Don't stop. That's so good. So now talk about you guys outside of the music. So then on the personal side, all of you guys, what are your hobbies? What do you do outside of Mystery Friends? Abby you first.

Abby:     Well it's funny because we all kind of have our corporate work jobs which kind of consume but we still find time for the band and for other things and yeah I'm really heavily involved in the events. You know industry out here in DC so I'm working a lot of events and going to a lot of events.

Brian:     Nice. What kind of events are your favorite kind of events?

Abby:     I, this is so cheesy but I love weddings. It's just, I cry at every single one of them.

Brian:     Oh my goodness. Oh that's so adorable stop it. I got ...

Robbie:     Even though she's missing mine.

Brian:     Oh.

Abby:     We're gonna do that right now aren't we.

Brian:     That's a shot over the bower. Alright.

Dave:     All out.

Abby:     That's just [crosstalk 00:05:43].

Brian:     He was waiting until now to do that. He really was.

Abby:     He was.

Brian:     Oh God that's hilarious. Alright Dave what about you man?

Dave:     So I am a also a tax lawyer. So that's less fun than music but it is what I do.

Brian:     That's so nerdy.

Dave:     Even for the synthesizers that I have. And then I also play, well I don't play so much baseball these days, but used to play baseball and now I'm auditing my [inaudible 00:06:05] shop because I'm playing music instead.

Brian:     Oh that's-

Dave:     And also Abby's being modest. She's also a successful solo artist and she just released a really cool video so you should check that out.

Brian:     Nice. And if they want to check out that video where do they go?

Abby:     It's on YouTube now and the official music video is up as of yesterday. Two days ago.

Brian:     And they should search for?

Abby:     Escape Plan by Abby Sevcik. And if you need help spelling that it's S-E-V-C-I-K.

Brian:     There it is. Alright and so next up. What do we got?

Danny:     I don't do a whole lot. I program professionally so I spend a lot of time around a computer and then I go home and play video games on my Nintendo Switch.

Brian:     Fantastic. [crosstalk 00:06:42] top two video games?

Danny:     Top two video games right now are we talking?

Brian:     Yeah. Like if you were going home now what two would you likely play?

Danny:     Probably Breath of the Wild and Golf Stories the current one. It's an RPG revolving around golf.

Brian:     And if they don't happen to know what game system are those on?

Danny:     Those are on Nintendo Switch.

Brian:     Got it.

Dave:     You thought the tax lawyer was nerdy?

Danny:     I was kind of like, "You made a mistake there."

Brian:     Oh well if you guys want to compete you know I got, that's cool. Alright and now what else? Talk to me man Robbie what do you got?

Robbie:     Yeah so I'll follow up with the day job as we all have them. I'm a real estate agent so I spend a lot of time looking at houses and et cetera. In my free time me and the fiancee [Bria 00:07:27] we love to go outdoors. We do a lot of hiking and skiing all those types of things.

Brian:     And what's the latest outdoor thing that you've done that comes to mind?

Robbie:     This is kind of weird but I'll go with it anyways. My buddy lives out in Alexandria and he decided he wanted to recycle a bunch of beer cans so we were outside. We built a kiln in his backyard and melted down beer cans and turned them into art. So ...

Abby:     Very outdoorsy.

Brian:     Oh my God.

Danny:     Yeah that's the type of outdoorsy

Dave:     Yeah the destructive fire based outdoorsy.

Brian:     Oh my God that's like, I didn't know what I was expecting but I wasn't expecting that. And then we were just talking about the nerdy level of the other two guys and now, oh wow. It's so good. I love you guys. Now one of my other favorite questions that I love to ask is if you could offer one piece of advice and this is for all of you guys, I want you to answer, if you can offer one piece of advice what would it be? Abby you're first.

Abby:     I think the best piece of advice I've been offered that I often relay is don't ever get to a point where you feel like you made it. I think that there's a lot of little success that come about that you're like "Oh my gosh this is so cool." You know I think you can kind of level yourself off if you're not careful. So just always you know remaining humble but also reaching for the next level of whatever you just obtained.

Brian:     Yeah and just out of curiosity what's the most recent success moment that comes to mind for you when you say that? Don't let it get to you but what comes to mind for you?

Abby:     It's crazy 'cause I'm sure a lot of people have experienced but this was my like, "Oh my gosh I made it." Dangerous but somebody saw me off the street and was like, "Are you in that band Mystery Friends?" I was like [crosstalk 00:09:03]. And I didn't want to know 'cause I'm sure like that was probably a friend of a friend but I'm like no I'm just going to go ahead and assume that that was a complete stranger.

Brian:     I am so glad that that happened to you. That's amazing. Alright Dave you're next man talk to me.

Dave:     I would say don't be lazy. I think, you know, if this band has been nothing else but exercise and you try there's a good chance you might just succeed even when you don't think your qualified or very good and you might not be. But if you're willing to go for it. I mean we basically shown that just trying and asking and just going of rit can be remarkably successful and it's really easy to do nothing so if you have a passion for it don't be lazy. Go for it.

Brian:     Don't be lazy. Right. I like it. And what is, is music an example of where you weren't lazy or didn't be lazy?

Dave:     Yeah I would say so. I would say I don't think the band collectively is very lazy with music. I think the first couple months we played or the first six months we played. We probably were pretty lazy you know. We sat around and played and just kind of you know tried out some sounds and hung out and ate pizza and once we decided we're actually going to do it and put a focus to it and like spend the time and money to make it right it was you know eye opening how much you can go by just being willing to go for it.

Brian:     That's awesome. Very cool. Alright next up talk to us.

Danny:     I think I mean this kind of plays into what Dave was saying but it's always worth asking the question so I mean that's how we kind of got a lot of our gigs around DC was just saying, "Hey can we play here?" And reaching out to different people I mean I think we even reached out to DC Music Rocks at some point and we're like, "Hey you know I don't think we know you but we'd love to." So I really do feel like kind of, you know, it's kind of like the Michael Scott quote, "You miss a 100% of the shots you don't take." Yeah.

Brian:     Is it Michael Scott? I feel like everybody [crosstalk 00:10:45] has been quoted. So many people have been quoted saying that actually. I heard it so many times. It was Michael Jordan, [Gramsky 00:10:52] I mean there are so many. Absolutely. Charles Barclay I'm sure one day I said it.

Danny:     He said a lot of things.

Brian:     Oh my God that's amazing. Alright Robbie. You're up man. You're in here too get up here. What do you got?

Robbie:     Keep throwing me near the mic so I'll take one from some personal experience. I think that I spent a lot of time growing up around some very talented musicians and always felt that I would not be able to play at their level and that if I did try to play along with them that I would be wrong and one thing I've learned from the band and from a lot of reading that I've done recently is you know there is no right or wrong in music until you've defined it, right? So music is supposed to be a conversation and the only way to get better is to play with other people and you know if you're lucky you'll find people who are better than you like all these folks here that'll make you become a better musician.

Brian:     That's awesome. I love it. Alright keep exploring keep doing it. I love it guys. And for those folks who want to find out more about you guys and the cool stuff that's happening with Mystery Friends where do they go?

Danny:     Mysteryfriendsmusic.com. We're on Facebook at Mystery Friends. Mystery Friends on Twitter, Mystery Friends on Instagram.

Dave:     Technically Mystery Friends band on Facebook but everything else is Mystery Friends.

Danny:     Okay. Fair.

Dave:     Some reason somebody else has Mystery Friends that is not us.

Brian:     Go figure right. And it's not a Scooby-Doo reference?

Dave:     It's not a Scooby-Doo reference.

Brian:     There it is. Okay.

Robbie:     But we are taking a mystery ...

Dave:     Yeah we are taking a van on tour which is effectively the mystery van but-

Brian:     Oh my God.

Dave:     But we will not be hopefully solving a crime.

Brian:     Please put a sticker on it or something. It would-

Dave:     We'd get sued is the only [crosstalk 00:12:23].

Brian:     Oh my God you're taking a band van. That's so good.

3/20/18 - Special Guest: Surprise Attack

Thanks to Ian, Jay, and Tom, of Surprise Attack, for hanging out with us in the studio this week!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. ***You and Me and Howard Cosell, by Quiet Life Motel (World, Jazz)
  2. M.D.M.A., by Surprise Attack (Funk, Jam)
  3. Petrified, by Chris Cassaday (Folk, Folk Rock)
  4. ***Come Up, by Jae Alexander (R&B)
  5. Dopener, by Of Tomorrow (Rock/Funk)

***The first time we've played this artist for you on the show, & a new artist profile added to our DC Artist Database! 

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


ANNOUNCEMENTS

We need your help supporting WERA 96.7FM, the station where the live version of our show airs!  Arlington County is planning to cut funding for the station by 20%, which would gut the station staff, drive up costs to the station’s community considerably, and potentially even cause the loss of the station itself.
https://www.arlingtonmedia.org/about/proposed-fy-19-county-budget-catastrophic-aim

The county board will vote on the proposed budget on April 21st. Here’s how we need your help before the vote:

1) If you live in Arlington, or know someone who does, forward them this link and sign our petition - Urging the County Board to restore AIM's funding. https://www.change.org/p/arlington-county-board-urge-the-arlington-county-board-to-act-to-restore-arlington-independent-media-s-funding

2) Share Your Feedback on Arlington's FY 2019 Proposed Budget - This county survey asks Arlington residents to give feedback on the proposed budget. Must be completed by April 9, 2018
https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/FY19BudgetFeedback

3) Write your County Board members - countyboard@arlingtonva.us - Tell them you want AIM's funding restored!!  Sample letter here - https://www.arlingtonmedia.org/about/proposed-fy-19-county-budget-catastrophic-aim/sample-letter-county-board-stop-aim-budget-cuts

4) Speak with a County Board member at an Open Door Monday. Open to all Arlington residents.  No appointment is necessary to talk one-on-one with a County Board member on any topic. Mondays, 7 - 9PM, at locations around the Arlington. See schedule below:

Open Door Monday at Aurora Hills Library - Monday March 26th
Open Door Monday at Langston Brown Community Center - Monday, April 2nd
https://countyboard.arlingtonva.us/open-door-mondays/


NEW MUSIC RELEASES

Our 2018 New Releases by DC Artists’ Spotify Playlist:
https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/7kbMQzbrQPisoJq5A76V3k


NEW VIDEOS

Thievery Corporation - Voyage Libre
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JAOEo_sVRo0

Handsome Hounds Tiny Desk Video 2018
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sBngpY9RwV4

Our ‘DC Artists Official Music Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70kU0_uB-sdviWajkbzi2Akr


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Check the calendar, linked below, for the full list!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Fri Mar 23
Human Country Jukebox @ Hill Country in Downtown DC

Sat Mar 24
Womxn Screw Stuff Up (Clean Words) Festival @ Songbyrd Music House in Admo
Split Seconds & Curse Words @ Milkboy Arthouse in MD

Sun Mar 25
Two Ton Twig @ Solly’s on U St

Wed Mar 28
Ardamus @ Milkboy Arthouse in College Park, MD


Patreon

Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **Music 4 The Revolution (Abu Jibran)**



Surprise Attack

Video - Bio - Links - Transcript

Surprise Attack's Bio:

SA Full Band.jpg

Drawing inspiration from across the musical spectrum to create their unique "Mountain Funk" sound, Surprise Attack thrives on collaboration and improvisation. The group’s five members share a deep connection and a passion for uncompromising, progressive music that keeps listeners guessing and always lands somewhere unexpectedly familiar.

Links:
Website
Facebook
Bandcamp
Instagram

Jay & Ian.JPG
surprise attack.jpg

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:     On DC Music Rocks, we're shining a spotlight on the great songs, artists, and incredible people behind the DC region's local music scene. And Surprise Attack pushes the envelope when it comes to seamlessly blending genres and improvisation. Their unexpectedly eclectic blend of funk, jazz, rock, roots music, and hip-hop, is something they often call Mountain Funk. Multi part harmonies, searing instrumental leads, dynamic rhythmic breaks, and nostalgic covers are only a few of the tools Surprise Attack uses to entertain and delight you when you come and see them.  This five piece group demonstrates a keen ability to reflect the energy of an audience back at them, and creating unique and unforgettable experiences. They're also great dudes. I came across these guys way back when I started the show, and I've been following them for two years ... two plus years, at this point, and I love all these releases. It is such a treat to now get to share you guys with everybody listening. Thanks for being here, guys.

Tom:     [crosstalk 00:00:57]. Thanks, Brian, yeah, it's great to be here.

Brian:     This is awesome. What is it that makes Surprise Attack special? I talked about the blend of the different genres of the Mountain Funk, and then there's also that ... I talked about the ... sending the energy back to the audience. What else? What makes you special?

Tom:     It's the friendship at the core. Really, we've been extremely close friends for a really long time. We're all odd. We're quirky. And I really think when we get together, we just ... we really click in a way that is special, and I think the music that we put out is a direct reflection of that.

Brian:     Absolutely. And if they haven't been to a Surprise Attack show, what's it like?

Jay:     We try to project fun. Fun is what we've got from a lot of people, so we try to read the crowd and sort of the venue, and try to cater the musical experience to that, because you don't want to just come up there with the same couple songs that you always do.

Brian:     Right.

Jay:     People might get bored of that really quickly, so we like to really ... Our name is Surprise Attack. We like to really [crosstalk 00:02:12].

Brian:     Surprise attack them?

Jay:     ... any idea of what's coming, so when you hear, it's supposed to give that feeling.

Brian:     That's awesome. So now, right along those lines then, when it comes to memorable moments where you surprise attacked someone, what comes to mind for the most successful moment for surprise attacking people?

Ian:     Well actually, recently we played ... What was the name of that bar we played?

Tom:     The Midlands?

Ian:     Yeah, the Midlands. And we went into ... Oh, sorry. And we went into Cali Love ... California Love, but Tupac.

Brian:     Stop it. Really?

Ian:     Yeah. That surprise attacked the hell out of everybody.

Brian:     I can only imagine. Wow. And knew all the words? Rapped to it?

Ian:     Yeah, the bartenders were all taking videos and everything. They loved it.

Brian:     That's awesome. What a cool thing. I love it.  And now, the story behind the name. Surprise Attack, where did that come from?

Tom:     Believe it or not, Surprise Attack formed a little over 10 years ago, the first time. We were a pop/punk sort of outfit.

Brian:     Really?

Tom:     Yeah, we were a pop/punk sort of outfit, so Surprise Attack was a great name for us then, and then we came back, we all loved jam music, and yeah, just the [segging 00:03:29] from one song to the other, the unexpected songs that come in and out of the sets. Surprise Attack just worked, and we've kept it ever since.

Brian:     Got it. The name was actually ... That was the name of the pop/punk group too?

Tom:     Yes.

Brian:     So, it's been Surprise Attack since the beginning.

Tom:     Yes.

Brian:     Wow. And how long of a break was it between when you stopped and came back?

Tom:     It was like eight, nine years after our pretty much permanent hiatus, that we all decided to move back to DC and then start playing music again.

Brian:     And when you say, "We all", describe all the members and the pieces of the band. What makes up Surprise Attack?

Ian:     Well, at first was me and Tom, the guitar ... Sorry, this is Ian on the drums and Tom the guitar player, and then we had [Gerry 00:04:13] on the keys and Danny on the base, originally. That was when we were in high school. Then once we split up, got back together, and [Jayro 00:04:23], the percussion player joined the band, and that's been over a year now.

Jay:     Yeah, it was kind of ... I knew all these guys back then too, as well, but we all ended up going to different colleges, and so we were spread out.

Brian:     Oh, of course.

Ian:     Except for Tom and I. We both went to Virginia Tech, and that's where ... I had my electronic drum kit there that I could make work in the townhouse that I had. Then Tom would come over and jam, so that's kind of how me and him started musically collaborating. Once we all sort of moved back to this area, after the college period kind of, then got back into it.

Brian:     You described ... I hear six people. Yeah? There's six?

Tom:     There's five of us.

Brian:     Five of us. Got it. And the instrumentation is two drums ... What is it? Tell me the rest.

Tom:     We've got the standard traditional drum kit. We got Jayro who plays percussion, like [tongos 00:05:25], bongos, all sorts of random fun loud-making stuff.

Brian:     Okay.

Tom:     Guitar. We got keyboards, and we've got base.

Brian:     And base. What a great ... And that means you can play any cover too, because you've got all the instruments you need to do that. Oh man, guys, that's fun.  What about ... Outside of the music thing in your personal time, I want you guys to each share. What do you do for fun? Outside of that.

Ian:     Well actually, coincidentally, I started doing music lessons. I know this is music related, but that's actually what I do for my job now.

Brian:     Really? What kind of ... so you teach lessons?

Ian:     I teach drums, guitar and piano.

Brian:     Where is that? Where do you do that?

Ian:     It's at a place called Bach to Rock.

Brian:     Nice.

Ian:     Yeah. Teaching kind of from six to 13 or so. Younger kids.

Brian:     Very cool.

Ian:     Yeah. It's a lot of fun.

Brian:     Teaching music lessons.

Ian:     Mm-hmm (affirmative).

Jay:     This guy can play everything, man.

Brian:     Everything drums, or everything ...

Jay:     Like everything.

Brian:     [crosstalk 00:06:29], like whatever you want. Wow, man. That's amazing.

Ian:     All the rock instruments.

Brian:     Awesome. And what else? About the rest of you?

Tom:     This is Tom, and I'm a huge yoga advocate. That's probably-

Brian:     Really?

Tom:     ... the thing that eats up the most of my time outside of the band.

Brian:     Now, when you say, "Huge", does that mean daily, twice daily?

Tom:     Not twice daily. It's definitely a daily thing for me. Sometimes more than others, but it's just been a huge part of my life for the past four or five years. It really keeps me grounded.

Brian:     Grounded is such a good yoga word, that they use. [crosstalk 00:07:02] associated with it. Do you go to a studio to do this, or do you teach it, or do you just do it at home, or what?

Tom:     There's a ton of great studios around Arlington, Virginia. Everywhere in northern Virginia and DC has them. I'll do stuff at home. I'll do stuff at studios. I like experimenting. Doing with a community is nice, and then practicing on my own can be nice too sometimes.

Brian:     Very cool.

Jay:     And this is Jay, and I started skateboarding at six years old and used to do it competitively. I don't do it as much anymore. I'm kind of a big guy to be skating. It hurts when I fall.

Brian:     Now, when you say a big guy, if they don't know how big you are ...

Jay:     Well, I'm 6'4" and weigh about 200 pounds.

Brian:     Got it. Yeah, that is pretty tall for skateboarding. You're right.

Ian:     Everybody in this band is really tall, except for me. Everybody is six feet and above, and I'm standing here over here, 5'9".

Brian:     So Ian, the 5'9" under the giants.

Ian:     Yeah, exactly.

Brian:     Oh god, that's amazing.

Jay:     But yeah. I don't do it as much anymore, but I still get out there a lot, and still try to do some crazy stuff from time to time.

Brian:     Nice. I like it, guys. One of my favorite questions to ask, and I want each of you to answer it is, if you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be?

Ian:     To other bands, or ...

Brian:     I'm going to leave it entirely up to you.

Ian:     Oh, okay.

Brian:     It's just your piece of advice to whoever.

Jay:     Listen to Surprise Attack.

Tom:     This is why we put Jay [crosstalk 00:08:28].

Brian:     That was Jay, and Jay, you still got to come up with something else. But we do love that advice. I do. I do.

Ian:     That's just good advice for life, in general. Listen to Surprise Attack.

Brian:     Absolutely. I would say, "And then go to a show and be surprised and attacked." There's that too. Go ahead, Ian, what do you got?

Ian:     Well, I guess for bands in the area starting up and stuff, just going to a bunch of different shows and supporting local music and stuff is definitely ... definitely was a big help for us, as far as just making friends and also seeing different styles and stuff like that. Listen to as many people as you can, I would say.

Brian:     Awesome. That's cool. What about you, Tom?

Tom:     I got to say, just in general, do your do.

Brian:     Do your do. It sounds like a Mountain Dew commercial.

Tom:     It's not a Mountain Dew commercial. There's a lot of things that we're told that we can't do, we shouldn't do, things that are just a bad idea for us to go down. In particular, as a musician, that one really strikes home for me. Really, just if you've got the passion to do something, absolutely go for it, and give it everything you've got.

Brian:     Absolutely.

Ian:     I like that.

Brian:     I like that one. Absolutely. All right, Jay. Your second shot. More advice. I was only asking for one, but you're allowed two.

Jay:     Drink a lot coffee, so that it can support you to ... As a musician and everything, it's ... As you're coming up and trying to really make it work, you still got other things in your life you try to balance and get everything together, but just every time that I'm ... just kind of notice I'm sitting around and doing nothing, I just kind of have the realization, and just try to stay energetic, and stay on the path towards achieving whatever I've set out to achieve. I just try to have a lot of energy when it comes to that, just so that I can achieve kind of a good balance with my goals and living life.

Brian:     Absolutely. When you have those moments, take advantage of them and do the stuff that's important, not just [inaudible 00:10:44]. I like that. I like that.  Cool. And for those folks who want to find out more about Surprise Attack, where do they go?

Tom:     SurpriseAttackDC.com is the definite place to get any and all Surprise Attack information. Looking us up on Facebook also. There's a ton of information, and all of our music is available for free for download; Band Camp, SoundCloud, Spotify, iTunes.

Brian:     That's amazing. All right. And is there one social media that you guys do more on than the others?

Ian:     Probably Facebook, at this point, but we're getting more involved with Instagram and stuff. We've been thinking about getting a Twitter, but ...

Brian:     Facebook and Instagram

 

3/13/18 - Special Guest: The Fringe Benefits

Thanks to Bruce and Dave with The Fringe Benefits for hanging out with us in the studio this week!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. Until They Find Us, by The Grey A (Indie, Rock)
  2. Step Out, by The Fringe Benefits (Pop, Motown)
  3. Hurricane, by Hayley Fahey (Rock, Indie Rock)
  4. Diamonds Are Optional, by Vintage#18 (Blues, Soul)
  5. Someone Special, by Stephen Ascone (Pop)

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


ANNOUNCEMENTS

Brian was interviewed! Somehow word got around about DC Music Rocks, and I was contacted via Linkedin to do a "12 Minute Convo" (Podcast). Sometimes you just have to say yes and try things in life, and this was so random, I was skeptical, and turned out fun! Also fun to be the one answering the questions for a change!
https://twelveminuteconvos.com/brian-nelson-palmer/

 

We need your help supporting WERA 96.7FM, the station where the live version of our show airs!  Arlington County is planning to cut funding for the station by 20%, which would gut the station staff, drive up costs to the station’s community considerably, and potentially even cause the loss of the station itself.
https://www.arlingtonmedia.org/about/proposed-fy-19-county-budget-catastrophic-aim

The county board will vote on the proposed budget on April 21st. Here’s how we need your help before the vote:

  1. If you live in Arlington, or know someone who does, forward them this link and sign our petition - Urging the County Board to restore AIM's funding. https://www.change.org/p/arlington-county-board-urge-the-arlington-county-board-to-act-to-restore-arlington-independent-media-s-funding
  2. Share Your Feedback on Arlington's FY 2019 Proposed Budget - This county survey asks Arlington residents to give feedback on the proposed budget. Must be completed by April 9, 2018
    https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/FY19BudgetFeedback
  3. Write your County Board members - countyboard@arlingtonva.us - Tell them you want AIM's funding restored!!  Sample letter here - https://www.arlingtonmedia.org/about/proposed-fy-19-county-budget-catastrophic-aim/sample-letter-county-board-stop-aim-budget-cuts

Speak with a County Board member at an Open Door Monday. Open to all Arlington residents.  No appointment is necessary to talk one-on-one with a County Board member on any topic. Mondays, 7 - 9PM, at locations around the Arlington. See schedule below:

  • Open Door Monday at Arlington Mill Community Center- Monday, March 12th
  • Open Door Monday at Central Library - Monday, March 19th
  • Open Door Monday at Aurora Hills Library - Monday March 26th
  • Open Door Monday at Langston Brown Community Center - Monday, April 2nd https://countyboard.arlingtonva.us/open-door-mondays/

NEW MUSIC RELEASES

Our 2018 New Releases by DC Artists’ Spotify Playlist:
https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/7kbMQzbrQPisoJq5A76V3k


NEW VIDEOS

Our ‘DC Artists Official Music Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70kU0_uB-sdviWajkbzi2Akr


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Check the calendar, linked below, for the full list!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Fri Mar 16
Karen Jonas & Skribe @ Lost Rhino in Ashburn, VA
Vim & Vigor @ The Ugly Mug on 8th St SE in DC
Sub-Radio @ Whitlow’s in Arlington

Sat Mar 17
Tabi Bonney @ Anacostia Arts Center
Justin Trawick and Pebble 2 Pearl @ Shamrock & Roll Festival in Loudon
--https://www.eventbrite.com/e/shamrock-roll-st-patricks-day-block-party-tickets-42575122337

Tues Mar 20
Mystery Friends @ Union Stage in DC

Wed Mar 21
Lavender @ Milkboy Arthouse in College Park MD


Patreon

Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **Music 4 The Revolution (Abu Jibran)**



The Fringe Benefits

Video - Bio - Links - Transcript

The Fringe Benefit's Bio:

The Fringe Benefits.jpg

The Fringe Benefits began forming at the end of 2013 with talented and experienced musicians from northern Virginia. The 5 piece band based in Gainesville Virginia features drums, guitar, bass, guitar synth and 5 vocalists. Julianna Smith, lead vocalist has a big, powerful and soulful voice that makes the band’s recordings instantly recognizable.

The band performs regularly in Northern Virginia. Playing songs that draw ladies to the dance floor, the band creatively “mashes-up” covers of songs from 80’s to today. The band also plays a original songs including "You're On My Time Now" that went to #1 on the Radio Indie Alliance chart in 2017 and just released Oct 2017, “Step Out” which won an honorable mention in the pop category at the recent Songwriters Association of Washington. On March 3rd at our 4 year anniversary show, we introduced a new original “Mama Knows Blessed”.

Links:

http://www.thefringebenefitsband.com
http://facebook.com/FringeBenefitsBand/
Twitter- @fringebenefitsb

3yrCakePose Fringe Benefits
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INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:     On DC Music Rocks, we're shining a spotlight on the great songs, artists and incredible people behind the DC region's local music scene. The Fringe Benefit's is a 5 piece band based in Gainesville, Virginia featuring drums, guitar, bass, guitar synth and vocalists. Five vocalists. I mean, everybody sings. We've got Juliana Smith, who's lead vocalist, has big, powerful and soulful voice that makes the bands recordings instantly recognizable. They were born in 2013. The band performs regularly around northern Virginia and they play originally music and creatively mash up covers of songs of the 80's to today. So, I first came across them when I was doing the show a while back and I've been A Friend's Benefit's fan. The album Step Out came out and I've just been following them and I love the stuff that you're doing. So, basically, for me, being the fan boy, it's an honor to have you here man. Bruce, thanks and Dave, thanks for coming down guys. Thanks for being here.

Bruce:     It's an honor to be here Brian and I've gotta tell you, you know, the things that you're doing for the local music scene. As I mentioned earlier, it's kind of like you're the Paul Shaffer of golden Virginia music. You know everybody now.

Brian:     Wait, they don't know who Paul Shaffer is, who's Paul Shaffer?

Bruce:     He's the guy that knows everybody in the music business and actually performed with everybody from James Brown to Aretha Franklin to on and on.

Brian:     God. Okay. I take that as a compliment then. Holy smokes. I like to say I know of them. I don't know all of them yet but I'm trying. Thanks Bruce. I appreciate that man. So, now, what is it that makes the Fringe Benefit's special? That's what I want to know off the bat.

Bruce:     I don't think this was on the list.

Brian:     There's a lot of bands out there. So, what is it that makes the Fringe Benefit's show or the Fringe Benefit's a little different from the others?

Bruce:     Yeah. So, I would say it's really stage presence. The covers consist of the core of the shore. We do the original songs as self promotion and give us something unique but really I would say, truly, honest, it's stage presence. We used to have different ones that were singing lead vocal and when you're singing to the people in the audience, they're looking at you and you make eye contact. So, a year ago John said you know, I'm singing lead vocal in the song. Nobody's looking at me. Everybody's looking at Juliana and I said well dude, I'm not gonna tell her to cut her stage presence. You gotta increase your stage presence.

Brian:     You gotta step it up buddy.

Bruce:     Yeah. Step it up and we have so, it's happening but yeah, we go from song to song well. We play popular songs that people know and enjoy and we mix in a couple originals but I think it's the stage presence. We do have a little bit different instrumentation. I'm sure you have some listeners out there that are musicians. I'm playing guitar synth. So, while you see me play guitar, you hear piano, organ, saxophone, different instruments and I do all that live. There's no track. Every note is played.

Brian:     That's amazing and Dave you're here with us too. Now, talk about, what do you think is special? You're working with the band, you're doing some of the booking too. So, talk about what you do and then talk about what you think makes Fringe Benefit's a little different? What are you booking for?

Dave:     Sure. Well, I like to work with them because they're just all about having fun and the music industry can be crazy and it can be hard to get gigs and how to get motivated to go out and knock on doors, make phone calls, and send emails. Working for these guys has been a privilege because I see just how much fun they have playing and how much fun their fans have coming out and dancing and grooving to their music all night long. I think that goes a really long way to have a group of people that are good friends, that enjoy each other's company and they just have a lot of fun.

Bruce:     You really get three aspects of playing in music. You get the gigs, the music and then the relationships and we take advantage and have fun with all that but as you talk about having fun, this is a big contrast to one of your artists that you played earlier. They're all political. We have nothing political in what we're doing unless it's in a popular cover tune. Then it's not us saying it.

Brian:     True. That's one of the great things I love about the DC scenes too is that you really get everything. [crosstalk 00:04:43] People sing about what's close to their heart and if you're writing, you're writing a song about step out - which is about your friends that are coming out and one of your other songs might be about something else that happened to you. For some people, this is how they air their political frustrations and for others it's where you get your inspiration from and it changes every time.

Bruce:     Beautiful.

Brian:     So, it's a cool thing. Now, talk about where does the name come from? Fringe Benefits. What's the story there?

Bruce:     So, my version of the story is we were coming together long about the time Obama Care was coming in and it was my belief that no one could afford health insurance for their employees. So, maybe they could provide some fringe benefits. Maybe one of those could be having the Fringe Benefits band at the company party.

Brian:     So, I liked to point out how you just talked about how you weren't political and yet that's the story of your name Bruce.

Bruce:     Well, I didn't ask the question.

Brian:     Man, that's funny.

Bruce:     There's nothing wrong with having Fringe Benefits, right?

Brian:     That's darn right. I enjoy Fringe Benefits. Fringe Benefit's are nice.

Bruce:     Yeah, I get dinged for that one. Okay.

Brian:     I just had to call you out there for a second because that's really funny. All right. So, your connection to the DC scene, how long have you guys both been in the DC area and what part of the area?

Bruce:     So, I've been here and gone and come back. So, I went to high school - Jeb Stuart, [Oakton 00:06:06]. We're on Wilson Boulevard now. So, down at Seven Quarters, the Eaton Center was [Lafiat 00:06:13] Radio and I worked there. A lot of people don't realize this but the CB boom, nationwide, started in that store and I was a witness to it. So, it was pretty cool but now I've been living in Manassas for 20 years.

Brian:     Got it and what about you Dave?

Dave:     I grew up in Gray Falls and went to Langley High School. My first concert I remember was at the Patriot's Center and it was with the Deaf Tones, Incubus and Tape Root and I just remember having the time of my life and I knew from then on, music was a passion of mine.

Brian:     Yep. [inaudible 00:06:52] I love it. Bruce, you brought up memory with music, Bruce, what's your earliest memory with music?

Bruce:     So, I think it's a pretty cool story. So, one of the kids in the neighborhood got a silk shier, several tone, acoustic guitar and one of the other kids came up and said hey, yo, Ed's got a guitar! We gotta go check it out!  So, we went over to Ed's house and we were pulling the guitar out of each other's hands playing The Lick From Dirty Water. It was a hit song.

Brian:     Okay.

Bruce:     By the Stand Bells and so, that was my earliest memory. Well, about five years ago, I had a beer with the bass player from the Stand Bells.

Brian:     Really? Oh my god.

Bruce:     Pretty cool.

Brian:     That's amazing. Wow. Oh, man. That must have been wild. Oh goodness and while we're on the topic of moments in history here, talk about the funniest moment for the band. What comes to mind?

Bruce:     Two years, maybe three years ago, we dressed up for Halloween. We wanted to do dead rock stars. I did Elvis and many of you may know that Elvis died on the toilet and so, at the end of my choreographed, heart break hotel, there's a turd on the stage. Juliana said I'm not going up there.

Brian:     Oh, that's awful. Oh, man. What did you do?

Bruce:     So, we had a good laugh. Well, actually one of our friends picked it up and pretended to eat it. So, that was [crosstalk 00:08:30].

Brian:     But this was supposed to be funny.

Bruce:     You know who you are.

Brian:     Oh my god. That's unbelievable. All right. Wow. So, when we're not talking about the music stuff then. So, on the personal side, talk about your hobbies and interests. What do you guys do outside of the music? Bruce you first.

Bruce:     Okay. The music is like a therapy for me and kind of powers me for everything else I do. My day job is internet advertising but I also have a company where I do software for printing companies and then community service stuff. I served on the board of the Prince William Chamber of Commerce.

Brian:     Oh.

Bruce:     And the Center for the Arts and the Candy Factory in Manassas. I'm a member of the Manassas Rotary Club and as a band, the Fringe Benefit's have cooked for the homeless a couple times at the serve shelter in Manassas.  So, I'm gonna sign us up and do that again. So, we have a lot of fun just doing stuff for other people.

Brian:     Man, community service stuff. I like that Bruce. Dave, what about you?

Dave:     I'm actually big on the gardening.

Brian:     Really?

Dave:     Yeah.

Brian:     Fantastic.

Dave:     I'm on 5 acres and just planting fruit trees and vegetables and we got chickens. Just big into that and connecting with nature and going hiking and traveling. I just got back from Costa Rica.

Brian:     Costa Rica.

Dave:     I was there for two weeks-

Brian:     Nice.

Dave:     It's an amazing place. I highly suggest it.

Brian:     That's cool. All right. Lots of stuff going on outside and now, I guess to tag onto that then, let's say it's the weekend and you've got nothing on the schedule, you actually have open time. What would you do? If it's Saturday, Sunday and you don't have anything on the schedule, what would you do?

Bruce:     Me? I'm working.

Brian:     What does that mean? For one of the companies or for-

Bruce:     Yeah. Doing ads for clients or either I'm goofing off. Actually, last weekend what I did was working on new technology for the guitar synth. So, that's a fun thing.

Brian:     That's right. You get your guitar synth. That's your thing. What about you Dave? What would you do if you had a weekend off?

Dave:     I will literally be in my garden at like midnight pulling out weeds and planting stuff. I'll have my head lamp on and you know-

Brian:     Oh my god. Those amazing head lamps? You have to see a picture. I took a selfie with them so you can see it and I'm just envisioning him with a headlamp on at midnight. That's really funny. I love that. Gardening.

Dave:     Gardening.

Brian:     Gardening's a thing. I love it.

Dave:     Very therapeutic.

Brian:     Okay, cool. Well, and this questions to both of you guys. This is one of my favorite questions to ask in these interviews is if you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be? And I want to hear from both of you actually. So, Dave, why don't you go first?

Dave:     So, piece of advice for bands, correct?

Brian:     It's up to you. You can offer whatever piece of advice to whoever you want.

Dave:     Okay. Well, I mean the first piece of advice would be to have fun like we talked about with the Fringe Benefits. That's so important. If you're going to be in a band, you're going to be committed to being with these set of people and practicing and going to shows and be committed to this. Have fun and pick people that you're going to get along with and then practice. Really prepare yourself for the gigs, get your songs down, your set list and know what direction you want to go and have a clear vision. Have a plan.

Brian:     Yeah.

Dave:     And then execute it. Go out, get gigs, get a booking agent - someone that's going to represent you.

Brian:     What's the best way to get a booking agent? You just reach out?

Dave:     Yeah, you can give me a call.

Brian:     There you go. Go ahead and say your name is-

Dave:     My name is Dave. Dave [Maskatello 00:12:14]-

Brian:     And how do they find you?

Dave:     Planetary music is my company. You can go on Planetaryband.com. I just bought a new domain. It's going to be Planetarymusic.com, which I'm now building but Facebook's great. Anyway, Planetary Music but there's plenty of agents and you can find some great managers in the area and a manager, if you're an original band, is really important because they'll help you manage your day to day stuff and get the right recording study and get into interviews like this.

Brian:     There you go, yeah.

Dave:     A band called Foot Work that needs to get out here.

Brian:     Oh, there it is. Please do welcome Foot Work, whenever they want to come on, I would love to have them because Foot Work's a great hip hop. I love the hip hop scene in DC and man, Foot Work is one of the early ones I found and I love them so that would be cool.

Dave:     They're about to go on tour in April but anyway, back to the advice. Yeah, promote your shows.

Brian:     Yep.

Dave:     Definitely promote your shows.

Brian:     It's huge.

Dave:     Venues, yes, they're going to do their part and band's gotta do their part.

Brian:     And Bruce, what about you man? One piece of advice.

Bruce:     So, on the fun side, it's never go to a radio interview unprepared.

Brian:     Public service announcement. Thank you Bruce. I appreciate that and the man is prepared. I give him credit. He's got notes in front of him right now. This man is ready. So, I love it. I truly appreciate that man. I appreciate that. That's good. All right. One more time. For those folks who want to find and follow more about the Fringe Benefits and the things you're doing and where you're playing and all that stuff, where do they go?

Bruce:     Thefringbenefitsband.com

3/6/18 - Some of Brian's All Time Favorite Jams - All Music Episode

We're on Spring Break here at DC Music Rocks.  Brian's put together an episode of some of his favorite tracks which he'll be jamming out to during this vacation, we wanted to share them with you too!  Turn it up for this one!  

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcherPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM TODAY'S SHOW

MUSIC

  1. Be Your Baby, by Katie Hargrove (Pop)
  2. WDYG (Where Did You Go), by All The Best Kids (Hip Hop/Pop)
  3. Vapor, by Black Dog Prowl (Hard Rock)
  4. The Remedy, by Dr. Badlove & The Remedies (Hip Hop)
  5. Simple Reunion, by The Jones (Hard Rock)
  6. Pa Ra Ra, by Aztec Sun (Funk)
  7. Send Me, by Stone Driver (Hard Rock)
  8. Mrs. Piano, by Kenny Sway (R&B)
  9. The West Texas Blues, by Fellowcraft (Rock)
  10. Gotta Have Your Love, by Area 301 (Hip Hop)
  11. Annabelle, by Carter Lou & The Project (Rock)
  12. Red Flag, by Cassie Urbany (Rock)

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


 

PATREON

Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **Music 4 The Revolution (Abu Jibran)**



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2/27/18 - New Music Release Highlights From 2018 So Far - All Music Episode

We're on Spring Break here at DC Music Rocks.  During this vacation time for us, we're listening to the new releases just from 2018 so far, and we think they're SO GOOD!  Here's an episode full of some of the good ones we've found, we hope you enjoy!  

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcherPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM TODAY'S SHOW

MUSIC

  1. This Is Love, by Justin Trawick and the Common Good (Folk/Bluegrass)
  2. Blessings, by Alex Vaughn (Hip Hop/R&B)
  3. Flight 232, by Dan Wolff (Rock/Pop Rock)
  4. Be My Home, by Lauren Calve (Folk/Indie)
  5. Wide Eyed and Reckless, by Mystery Friends (Indie/Synth Pop)
  6. What Are We, by Sub-Radio (Pop/Synth Pop)
  7. The Lake, by Wylder (Indie)
  8. Dance With You, by Mista Fingaz (Electronic Pop/R&B)
  9. Pressure, by Luke James Shaffer (Rock/Pop Rock)
  10. Downtown, by Dupont Brass (Funk/Brass Band)
  11. Devastation, by Elizabeth II (Rock/Pop Rock)
  12. Boss's Dime, by Two Ton Twig (Bluegrass)

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


 

PATREON

Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **Music 4 The Revolution (Abu Jibran)**



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2/20/18 - Special Guest: Edjacated Phools

Thanks to Edjacted Phools for hanging out with us in the studio this week!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. Chicken Soup, by Matt Waller (Reggae, Alternative Rock)
  2. The Seams, by Edjacted Phools (Rock/Punk)
  3. Trying to be Heard, by The Radiographers (Rock, Blues Rock)
  4. Vanity, by Higher Education (Country)
  5. Mountain Home, by Kitchen Noise (Rock)

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


ANNOUNCEMENTS

Ben Tufts and the Craig Tufts Foundation Hosts Tribute Benefit Event - ‘100 musicians cover The Police’.

On Saturday and Sunday, March 3-4, 2018, over 100 of the area’s top artists will gather at Gypsy Sally’s to pay homage to rock band The Police. This musical showcase is the eleventh event and fourth tribute show in the popular Ben Tufts and Friends series, hosted by local musician Ben Tufts. Tickets are $15 and available through the Gypsy Sally’s website. All profits from the event will benefit The Craig Tufts Educational Scholarship Fund, established in memory of Ben’s late father, which provides scholarships for youth studying nature through exploration and adventure. The Craig Tufts Educational Scholarship Fund was co-established by the Tufts family and The National Wildlife Federation, a 501(c)3 non-profit organization.


NEW MUSIC RELEASES


NEW VIDEOS

Alex The Red Parez - Raining Down https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7MmdNfLBuAE

Soundproof Genie - Hollow Love
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-h5Ccvf4i6I

Our ‘DC Artists Official Music Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70kU0_uB-sdviWajkbzi2Akr


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Check the calendar, linked below, for the full list!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Fri Feb 23
Uptown Boys Choir @ Rock N Roll Hotel on H St NE

Sat Feb 24
Ardamus @ DC9 by U St NW
Three Man Soul Machine @ Pearl Street Warehouse by Waterfront in SW

Sun Feb 25
Two Ton Twig @ Solly’s on U St NW
A Shrewdness of Apes @ Villain & Saint in Bethesda

Mon Feb 26
Caustic Casanova @ DC9 Nightclub by U St NW

Tues Feb 27
Time Is Fire @ Rock N Roll Hotel on H St NE

Thu Mar 1
Touch The Buffalo @ Villain & Saint in Bethesda


Patreon

Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **Music 4 The Revolution (Abu Jibran)**



Edjacated Phools

Video - Bio - Links - Transcript

Edjacted Phool's Bio:

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The Edjacated Phools are a 6-piece fusion band based in Baltimore, MD. Comprised of Devin Barone (drums), Tyler Garrison (bass), Nick Hatzis, (vocals) Kyle Sappington (vocals), Logan Sappington (guitar, vocals), and Ben Yancheski (keys), they combine an energetic blend of rock, reggae, hip-hop, ska and punk influences into a unique sound.

The band had an exciting 2017, having been selected to open for The Expendables for the second time on March 14th at Rams Head Live in Baltimore, as well Badfish at The Fillmore in Silver Spring, MD on May 5th. Edjacated Phools also signed with Raised Fist Records in August and released their debut album, Check The Vibes, on September 1st. The band also presented the 2nd Annual Hightopps Backstage Bash on September 9th.

Website: https://edjacatedphools.com/

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EdjacatedPhools

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/edjacatedphools

Twitter: https://twitter.com/edjacatedphools

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INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:     On DC Music Rocks we're shining a spotlight on the great songs, artists, and incredible people behind the DC region's local music scene. The Edjacated Phools are a six-piece fusion band based in Baltimore, Maryland, with members in DC and in Baltimore. They combine an energetic blend of rock, reggae, hip-hop, ska, and punk influences into a unique sound.

     The band signed with Raised Fist Records in August of 2017 and released their debut album you just heard that track from called "Check the Vibes," back on September first of 2017, and I've been a fan of these guys since, gosh, close to when I started the show, I've been an ... I've been following these guys since before they were with the record company, and before ... Like, way back in the beginning. I've been following you guys, and I've been such a fan of the work that you're doing and the incredible songs that you guys are putting out.

    So, the bottom line for me, personally, is let me just fanboy for a moment and just say, it is so freaking awesome to have you guys here, man. Thanks for coming and doing this.

Logan:     Thank you.

Kyle:     Much love, much love.

Nick:     [crosstalk 00:00:58] thank you so much.

Brian:     This is ... Now, describe, for those folks who aren't familiar with Edjacated Phools, what is it that makes you guys special, would you say, if they see you guys?

Nick:     I would say the one thing that sticks out is our energy on stage. I think we try to keep it very, very upbeat, and so our kind of in your face dynamic, our energy on the stage and just getting people's face, getting people to kind of dance and move around a lot. And our songs are really ... A lot of them are uptempo. A lot of them are really dynamic and very high energy. So, we try to convey that on stage, and I think people feel that for sure when they come to our shows, so ...

Brian:     And what is ... So, if they come to a show, what will they likely see? What's an Edjacated Phools show like?

Logan:     It's definitely going to be smokey in the room.

Brian:     Because you like those fog machines?

Logan:     Yes.

Kyle:     Yes.

Nick:     Yeah, we love smoke machines.

Logan:     Fog machine supporters over here. Now, if you're gonna come to an Edjacated Phools show is what you're gonna get is a whole mix of good people, great music, better vibes, I think that at all of our shows you can always find really diverse, you know, flow of an environment of people. You can always find everybody who's in there jamming out, drinking, having a good time, and just enjoying the music with us.

Kyle:     Yeah. Bottom line is you're gonna have fun if you come to one of our shows. I've never had someone tell me they didn't enjoy one of our shows and that's kinda like what we pride ourselves on, whether we're playing a three hour bar gig or a 30 minute set opening up for a touring band. We just bring the heat, you know. That's what we like to say to each other, "Let's bring the heater."

Logan:     The heater.

Kyle:     And when we go on stage we like to bring that heat with us, you know what I'm saying?

Logan:     That's awesome. Where does the name come from? Edjacated Phools cause it's spelled funny too. It's E-e-d-j ...

Kyle:     So, originally, there's a couple songs called "Educated Fools" by Rebelution, Damien Marley, and those are both kind of big influences to us, at least me, and we were doing the whole Reggae scene thing so the e-d-j-a ... The original spelling was j-a-h, Ed-jah-cated Phools, but we dropped the jah and we just stuck with Edjacated Phools cause we thought it was more us.

Brian:     And you should know, Phools is spelled p-h-o-o-l-s. Edjacated Phools.

Nick:     Always play with their minds.

Kyle:     E-d-j-a-c-a-t-e-d. Edjacated.

Brian:     Edjacated Phools. That's it.

Logan:     We educate ...

Brian:     [crosstalk 00:03:22] right along with the Reggae vibe that you guys, like in that song we just heard it's a more ... I really like that one. Now, talk about the ... So there's some DC and then some Baltimore connections. So, talk about the DC connection that you guys have. You talked about University of Maryland earlier. You played football at University of Maryland.

Kyle:     Yes, sir.

Brian:     That's Nick. What's the ... And there's another connection. What ...

Kyle:     So, my name's Kyle and I own the head shop in DC, like a glass, borosilicate glass studio, basically. We're a gallery. We've represented a collaborative of artists. We represent over 70 artists and, yeah, we sell smoking devices and high end one of one art pieces.

Brian:     Nice. Wow. All right. So definitely connected to the head and smoking art scene here in DC.

Kyle:     Yup. Exactly man. You don't put premium gas into a Hoop D, if you know what I mean, you know? You've gotta put that stuff into something nice.

Brian:     God, I hope not.

Nick:     Put it into something nice.

Kyle:     Exactly.

Brian:     Oh, that's it. Hold it up. One love. I love it. All right, now and what about ... So now, you guys ... Well, first of all, introduce yourselves cause we've had you talking for a little bit, so introduce yourselves and then the other members of the band. Talk about that real quick.

Kyle:     Well, my name's Kyle. I'm Logan's older brother. Me and Logan kinda started this whole music journey together a couple years ago and we've kinda met everybody else along the way and formed this amazing group. To my right, I have Nick. He's my co-vocalist. He's the sexy one. I'm the mean one.

Logan:     So sexy. So sexy, Nick.

Brian:     The sexy one?

Nick:     The mean one.

Kyle:     Well I wouldn't say mean, but I definitely have a mean beard. I've been working on this for a while so ...

Brian:     Yes, you do. You should appreciate pictures of this man's beard. If you check out the episode details, I've got one there.

Kyle:     It's flawless.

Brian:     It's pretty serious.

Kyle:     But yeah, we've got Logan. who's my little brother. He's been bothering me my whole life, playing guitar, so finally one day he was like, "Hey, man. Why don't you just play with me?" And I was like, "Cool." And uh ...

Brian:     And then who else? There's 3 more members.

Kyle:     Yeah, we have Devin, who's Nick's cousin actually and he's a monster drummer, super talented. We have Tyler Garrison who's a bassist. He was actually in the classical orchestra band at Talsom University.

Logan:     Fingers.

Kyle:     Yeah, we call him Fingers. When we met this kid, he had the most calloused hands.

Logan:     His fingers were gross.

Kyle:     Like, really. They were disgusting.

Logan:     Come on. Let them know. It was really [crosstalk 00:05:44]

Kyle:     Yeah. It was bad.

Logan:     He's playing a lot of bass.

Brian:     Okay. [crosstalk 00:05:47]

Logan:     He's slappin the bass, man.

Kyle:     But he just has peeled callouses all over his hands.

Brian:     Wow.

Kyle:     And I was like, "Your fingers are special." Then we got Ben who's like Logan's childhood best friend, who

Logan:     Ben Mancheski.

Kyle:     We didn't originally want Ben in the band. We were like, "Oh, no. Ben can be in the band." And then Ben just put in work and learned how to play the keyboard, taught himself, and he's been a huge asset for us.

Nick:     He's like a utility member. He started off on Melodica. He's really just well-versed in music in general ...

Kyle:     Super talented.

Logan:     Got a great ear, honestly.

Brian:     Wow. That's awesome, guys. Now, talk about you guys ... So on the personal side, outside of music now. You guys, are there hobbies ... What do you do in your free time besides this?

Logan:     I work and I play music. That's about it.

Brian:     Say more. You work what? You play music just with Edjacated Phools? Is there a [crosstalk 00:06:40] too?

Logan:     Yeah. We do the whole band thing, and then on nights when the whole band can't get together, Nick and me, we actually, we play a lot around Baltimore and we do a lot of acoustic sets together where we'll go play.

Kyle:     The dynamic duo.

Logan:     Yeah. The dynamic duo.

Nick:     Yeah, we try to stay involved with music any way we can. We play local bar gigs, do cover shows. I mean, I'm really big into fitness and stuff so I try to stay pretty active. I still skateboard, snowboard, you know. Even wake board on occasion.

Logan:     Yeah, it's a lot of fun.

Nick:     Surf whenever we can. We like traveling so ... We're all are really family oriented, too so we have really big families. Spend as much time with family as possible.

Brian:     Really?

Nick:     And, you know, just try to have a well-rounded lifestyle where, you know, we are balanced and always involved in something cool.

Kyle:     Yeah, I just became a dad in August so I have 6 ...

Brian:     Congratulations.

Kyle:     I have a 6 month old daughter.

Brian:     Holy smokes.

Logan:     Carter Jean.

Kyle:     Her name's Carter. Yeah, she's beautiful. Shout out to my wife for doing that.

Brian:     To both of you. You had to put it together.

Kyle:     She did the hard part.

Brian:     Clearly, clearly. Wow, man. Congratulations. And the family vibe sticks with you guys, too, cause you just said that you're all parts of different family. Your family members here in the band, too, which is [crosstalk 00:07:54].

Kyle:     I mean, really, I look at everyone of these guys like my brother so ... And if any of them ever needed anything, I'd do it at the drop of a hat, you know.

Brian:     Absolutely. Golly. All right, so now, talk about funniest moment as a band that comes to mind.

Kyle:     Oh my God. I don't know if I can tell this story.

Logan:     Are you all thinking what I'm thinking?

Kyle:     I'm thinking about the Expendables show.

Logan:     Yeah. Go ahead. You wanna take this or you want me to take this?

Kyle:     All right. I'll try to say it as nicely as possible. So basically, we had our first show at Sound Stage. We played with Pacifier and the Expendables. We opened the show up for them.

Logan:     And Tunnel Vision.

Kyle:     And Tunnel Vision. But, long story short, we all wanted to get pretty, you know, intoxicated that night so we decided to be responsible adults and get a AirBNB.

Logan:     We BNB'd it.

Kyle:     And us being the fools, we thought, "Why not just get the nicest Air BNB we can find in Baltimore for the night?" So we end up booking this mansion in Fed hill that's like 6 stories. It has libraries in it.

Brian:     Oh my God.

Logan:     The shower could hold 25 people.

Kyle:     It was like a Project X style house.

Brian:     Holy cow.

Logan:     It was amazing.

Nick:     You could read in every room.

Kyle:     But yeah, so Logan basically lied to the guy on AirBNB. He's like, "Yeah, I'm in town doing a video shoot." And I think the guy thought that Logan was doing porn at his place.

Brian:     Oh yeah?

Kyle:     So the guy decides to ...

Logan:     He stuck around.

Kyle:     Drop back in a little bit later that night.

Brian:     Oh good.

Kyle:     He comes home and there's like 55, 60 people just absolutely partying in this mansion like ...

Brian:     Oh my [crosstalk 00:09:25].

Logan:     It's getting wild.

Kyle:     No reservations, you know what I mean. Pretty much anything goes. The guy walks in and I'm just sitting at the table and I'm like, "Who's this old guy?"

Brian:     Oh, God.

Kyle:     He's like, "Where's Logan?"

Logan:     I'm literally in the corner talking to Fernando like, "Dude, we're screwed. We're so screwed, bro." And he's like, "What's wrong?" I'm like, "I don't know if this is gonna work out in our favor." And literally, right as I said that the guy tapped me on my shoulder and I turn around and it's the guy I rented the house from and he goes, "This is a lot more than 8 people." I was pretty much caught red-handed, [inaudible 00:10:02], but you know what, he was really chill about it. He thanked me for having all the people in the house take their shoes off. But the funniest part of this whole story is, right at the heat of the moment when I'm like freaking out and thinking this guy is gonna be so upset ...

Kyle:     Kick us out.

Logan:     He's coming down on me. I've got 65 people raging in his house. Our bass player, Tyler, walks right up to me and him in the middle of the conversation and says ...

Kyle:     He goes, "Yeah, this would be a great house to get weird in." And the guy's standing right there and just starts shaking his head and just like, "You guys need to go."

Brian:     Wow. So did you end up having to shut it down and leave or did you just [crosstalk 00:10:41]

Logan:     No.

Kyle:     No. We ended up just talking it out with him and we explained to him that we had some touring bands crashing at the house and we just got finished with a show.

Brian:     Thank you, Lance.

Kyle:     Yeah, he ended up being pretty cool, but there was definitely a designated talker on that night cause he walked into quite a party.

Brian:     Holy smokes. Now, talk about biggest success moment for Edjacated Phools so far. What comes to mind?

Logan:     Album release. No doubt. Our album release in July was definitely my proudest moment as a musician.

Brian:     Say more. How so?

Kyle:     Just, everyone came to support us that night, you know what I mean? It wasn't a show for anyone else. We had a great supporting cast. We had Never Ending Fall. We had Joint Operation. We had, you know, Foggy May. We had a number of super awesome bands, but the great thing about the Baltimore scene is that it's one big family, you know. Once you play with any of these bands, they're like family to you. They love you like you're their brother or sister and they definitely look out and show support whenever they can. And I think that's the most beautiful part about being in this scene is just the love that gets shared between, not only fans, but musicians amongst each other.

Logan:     For sure. The support is amazing.

Kyle:     But yeah, we had about 500 people come out to our album release party at Sound Stage in Baltimore and it was definitely one of the most fun nights for me. I thought we played a killer set and it was an extremely positive experience.

Brian:     Wow. That sounds amazing, guys.

Kyle:     What about you, Nick?

Nick:     So we do a ... It's called a Back Stage Bash. We do it at High Tops in Timonium. We put that festival on ourselves so to see kind of a festival that's being put on by us and a bunch of other bands coming out, pretty much the whole neighborhood gets together, and it's just a big festival style event that we put on and ... We're able to expose other groups, touring artists, DC artists, and just people, you know, you get on the bill and are into playing a big festival style show that we put on every year. We've been doing that now three years. We have another one coming up in September of this year and so that's one of our, I think that's one of our biggest accomplishments. Setting up a mini festival style event.

Brian:     Who's idea was that? How'd that come around?

Logan:     So, the original idea started with Fernando and me were talking about getting a whole festival together with Nick and Kyle at this winery ...

Nick:     Fernando's our manager.

Kyle:     Shout to Fern.

Logan:     Fernando Delgado. God, we love you. So it started out with just this idea like, "Hey, let's try to throw this festival at a winery." We ended up getting a bunch of good bands to respond and want to play the festival, but when we went to close the deal with the winery, the guy only wanted to sell one. So eventually, we decided ... I was talking for Fernando. I was like, "Hey, well why don't we just talk to our buddy Stink." And then we gave him a call up and we sat down and we had a meeting and we planned out the whole first event between Edjacated Phools and High Tops team. It really came together and I'm so proud of it. I couldn't be more proud of it. This year's gonna blow the roof off Baltimore.

Kyle:     Yeah, last year we had People's Blues of Richmond, Lits, Choppadelic, Bumping Uglies, us, Never Ending Falls, Stack Like Pancakes, Oogy Wah Wah. We had the Vibesman, Joint Operation, Neff. All those guys. It was a stacked line up and it's gonna just get ...

Nick:     Higher Education.

Kyle:     Higher Ed was the first year, they weren't the second year. It's just always a stacked line up and we always, you know, have a good time.

Brian:     That's awesome, guys. And now, one more question that I have ... This is one of my favorite questions to ask and it's for all three of you guys individually. It's if you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be?

Logan:     Work hard. I would just say keep working hard. Don't give up. Music is always an uphill battle and you never know really where you're at, but as long as you're doing it for the right reasons ... I think we all do music because we love to express ourselves and express a message that we can't do in our day to day lives that we do as a group of men and I love it.

Kyle:     Yeah.  I would say don't sweat the small stuff. At the end of the day ... There's things that happen in this life that you can control and there's things that you can't and at the end of the day you just should pay attention to what's important and what really matters and don't pay attention to little things that will just, you know, bother you, eat you up.

Brian:     What's an example of that, that comes to mind when you say that?

Kyle:     I'll give an example. Me and my brother were fighting a little bit earlier today cause we have two shows on Saturday. I'm supposed to work, you know what I mean? And I'm like, "Well, what if I can't make both shows?" You know. What's really important here? Should I come make this show or should I make the one later or ... What's more important? How do I make it work? You know what I mean? What's the point of getting all focused on the details? As long as it works out, it doesn't really matter.

Logan:     Don't sweat the small stuff.

Kyle:     Yeah. Don't worry about the details. Don't worry about everything. It's gonna all come together like it should in the end.

Brian:     Got it. What about ...

Nick:     I would say check your ego at the door, you now. We're all ... At the end of the day, we're all creators, but we're very opinionated and, you know ...

Kyle:     Passionate.

Nick:     We all have a place we wanna come from, musically. You can't really have an ego and be creatively collaborative at the same time, so as long as you leave that at the door then you can really be open to, you know, really creating something as a collaborative and having something that's really organically yours as a group, as opposed to imposing your creative will when we're in writing sessions or whatever it may be. So yeah ...

Brian:     Love it, guys. All right, and for those folks who want to find out more about you guys and follow what you're doing, where's the best place for them to go?

Logan:     Facebook. We're all over Facebook and our homepage, edjacatedphools.com. Please check it out. We have our website up. It's got all of our show dates. It's got videos. It's not news. It's got reminders for the band. Our Facebook, our website. We are on Spotify, iTunes, all of the social media sources so please, Google us if you want. Check out our music. We'd love to have you guys.

Brian:     Spell the name for them real quick.

Logan:     Yeah. It's e-d-j-a-c-a-t-e-d p-h-o-o-l-s.

2/13/18 - Special Guests: Alex, Paige, & Dan of DC's Open Mic Scene

Many thanks to Alex, Paige, and Dan from DC's thriving open mic show scene for being with us in the studio this week!  SCROLL DOWN to see the video, info, and transcript

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. Long Way Back to Shonot, by Eli Lev ( Indie, Indie Rock)
  2. Chemistry, by Paige Powell (Indie, Jazz)
  3. January Silver, by Alex The Red Parez and The Hell Rojos (Rock, Acoustic Rock)
  4. Too Many Times, by Colourtheory  (Punk, Pop Rock)
  5. Listen, by One Way Out  (Hard Rock, Rock)

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


NEW MUSIC RELEASES

Our 2018 New Releases by DC Artists’ Spotify Playlist:
https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/7kbMQzbrQPisoJq5A76V3k


NEW VIDEOS

Higher Education - Gift Called Life
https://youtu.be/lzZjSlyBiII

The making of Prinze George’s new track, Dividends
https://youtu.be/EzAiTeWplAQ

Rare Essence ft Kacey Williams of Black Alley - How I Wish You Could Love Me
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x3b0NwZ1gP8

Our ‘DC Artists Official Music Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70kU0_uB-sdviWajkbzi2Akr


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

So many shows everyday!  Click this calendar link to see them all!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Fri Feb 16
Handsome Hound @ Union Stage at The Wharf by Waterfront
Vim & Vigor, Justin Trawick, & Oh He Dead @ Rock N Roll Hotel on H St NE
Two Ton Twig @ Songbyrd Music House in Adams Morgan

Sat Feb 17
Surprise Attack EP Release Party @ Pearl Street Warehouse by Waterfront
Wylder @ U Street Music Hall on U St

Sun Feb 18
Eli Lev @ Milkboy Arthouse in College Park, MD

Wed Feb 21
Bottled Up @ Black Cat on 14th St


Patreon

Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
**Daniel Warren Hill**    **David Mohl**    **Eli Lev**
**Sarah Byrne**   **Music 4 The Revolution (Abu Jibran)**



Alex, Paige, and Dan 

VIDEO - BIO - LINKS - TRANSCRIPT


Paige Powell's Bio:

Paige Powell serves on the Board of Directors of the Songwriters Association of Washington (SAW) and hosts 2 open mics each month in the D.C. area for the organization. Paige has a real passion for songwriting, having written more than 150 songs, recording more than 60 of them, generating 2 CDs and 20+ singles released on iTunes and CDBaby.com.

Two of her songs, "Blackeyed Peas" and “Give Me A Beach” won honorable mentions from the Mid-Atlantic Song Contest. She continues to study songwriting, participating in many of SAW's workshops and seminars, which has included a 2-day workshop with Pat Pattison, lyric-writing teacher from the Berkley School of Music.


Open Mic Episode.jpg

Dan's Bio: 

Dan Magnolia: Singer / Songwriter / Storyteller / Speaker / Soundguy / Photographer

DAN MAGNOLIA is a contemporary troubadour who draws on his love of folk, outlaw country, Americana, and pop music to create unique and unforgettable songs that touch the heart, stimulate the mind, and move the soul.

Heavily influenced by singer-songwriters such as Steve Earle, Guy Clark, Bob Dylan, John Prine, and Josh Ritter, Dan’s music explores an array of timeless themes including life, love, family, history, nature, and the human condition. Dan has been an artist, a teacher, a guitar repair tech, a writer, and an entrepreneur and from these diverse experiences he has found that his passion in life lies in creating something from nothing. Whether he is using his hands and his toolbox or his imagination and his guitar, Dan has a unique gift for creating one-of-a kind works for the whole world to enjoy.

Among his career highlights, Dan has sung The Star Spangled Banner for The First Lady of Maryland, performed at the Jefferson Memorial, contributed a song to The Acoustic Guitar Project, told a story at The Moth, and appeared on the NPR game show, Ask Me Another with Ophira Eisenberg and Jonathan Coulton. Currently he hosts the open mic at The Black Squirrel Dunn Loring Va (1st+3rd Tuesdays) and the popular Marble & Rye Open Mic in Arlington Va until the bar shut down at the end of December 2017.

Web Online Links in order of most-to-least used:
Twitter: twitter.com/danielmagnolia
Instagram: instagram.com/danmagnoliamusic
Facebook: facebook.com/danmagnoliamusic
Website: danmagnolia.com


Alex's Bio: 

Alex The Red Parez aka El Rojo has been bringing acoustic rock and old-time country to the Washington DC Metro Area since 2006. Whether performing original music or classic material, Alex’s voice is “reminiscent of Johnny Cash, though often sung with Jello Biafra’s inflection” (Matthew Stabley, NBCWashington.com) and “sounds like Nick Cave reinterpreting the early songbook of Bill Callahan” (The Big Easy - MetroMusicScence.com). “El Rojo” to his friends, Parez takes inspiration from epic troubadours Johnny Cash, Bruce Springsteen, Tom Petty and local balladeer John Bustine amongst various other artists. In trio mode, Alex is flanked by accomplished harmonica sideman Terry Boes and prolific bassist Jason Mendelson of MetroSongs notoriety. Alex has also performed with several other local musicians for various tribute shows.

http://www.alexparez.com
fb.me/AlexTheRedParezakaElRojo
https://twitter.com/AlexTheRedParez
http://www.instagram.com/AlexParez

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT  

Brian:     On DC Music Rocks, we're shining a spotlight on the greatest songs, artists and incredible people behind the DC region's local music scene. Paige, Dan, and Alex all host open mics in the DC region. These type of events are happening all over the city every week, almost every day of the week, and mostly are pretty much unknown except for those who happen to have stumbled across them at some point. So today on the show, we're shining a spotlight on it, and I want to talk more about this largely unrecognized and intriguing open mic community that's here in our city. So guys, thanks for being here.

Dan Magnolia:     Thank you.

Alex Parez:     Yeah, thanks.

Paige Powell:     You're welcome.

Brian:     This is such a treat. Now, for those folks who share a little bit about what, describe, once again, share with them where the location and time of your open mic, and then share what makes your open mic special and or different in your opinion. So Alex, we'll start with you.

Alex Parez:     Well, I host the open mic at Roadside Grill every Wednesday night at 7:00 PM. We do two sign-ups at 7:30 and 10:00. We have a featured artist, usually as well. I guess, to me what really makes all the open mics special because I go to a lot of different open mics, including Dan's open mics. I haven't been to Paige's yet. I'm sorry, Paige.

Paige Powell:     That's okay. It's okay.

Alex Parez:     Is the people there and how much love they have for the open mic and coming and supporting it. I think that's special to every open mic. They all have that certain group of people that just love being there and the camaraderie, I think, is what really does it. And that's with every open mic you go to really.

Brian:     Absolutely. It's such a great community. It really is. Paige, talk about yours.

Paige Powell:     Well, the one coming up this Friday on February the 16th is sponsored by the Songwriter's Association of Washington. And one thing that makes these open mics that I host a little different is that we really encourage people who are writing original songs. They can come and they can kind of test their song that they wrote maybe this week or last week, and see how the audience reacts to it, and see if there's a line that really rings with one of the audience members. So you can also go to the Songwriter's Association of Washington website and SAW sponsors a lot of open mics in the area, more than I host. That would be a good thing for local songwriters.

     Then also, sponsored by the Songwriter's Association of Washington is the one that's in Greenbelt at the New Deal Café. And that's on the fourth Thursday of every month. And the next one is gonna be February the 22nd. Now that starts at 7:00 PM. We encourage original songwriters, but you can play a cover song.

Brian:     Sure.

Paige Powell:     That's allowed. Yeah. And I encourage people who've never done it. It's okay to come and just do one song. You don't have to do three just because three are allowed. You know, you just maybe want to take a baby step and do one song, and maybe your first time out, just come and attend. Just see what the scene is like.

Brian:     Awesome. And Dan, talk about yours and what you've got going on.

Dan Magnolia:     I host the open mic at the Black Squirrel. Like I mentioned earlier, there's one at Adams Morgan and there's a new one in Vienna Dunn Loring right by the metro, so it's super convenient. There's parking there, but you can easily take the metro. It's on the first and third Tuesdays of the month so far, but we're gonna increase that to every week soon. Not yet, since today is Tuesday. This is airing on Tuesday, so not tonight. February 20th.

Brian:     Well whenever you hear this, starting around February 20th.

Dan Magnolia:     There you go.

Brian:     Check with Dan Magnolia.

Dan Magnolia:     Exactly. We also do advanced sign-ups for that, which is nice for something that goes on during the week. So, if you're going to make the trek that you know that you have an exact spot with an exact time that you know that you have set down. So, that's something that we do online. You can sign up. One of the best things that I love about open mics, like Alex was saying, is that I think I wouldn't go so far as to say that they're unknown so much. They do have a niche market. You know, there's the rock market, and then there's the singer-songwriter folky market. And the thing that I love to do most of all is try to embrace everybody in the music scene. I used to host something called The Musician's Workshop, which would help get people out of their living rooms and into the public space. So my open mics are very similar the same. We love being able to welcome everybody, even newcomers and even young people. We have a lot of young kids that come in, too. So we always try to make it as open and accessible to everybody.

Brian:     That's awesome. And now, for those folks listening who might not, what are the differences between different open mics? You talked about how you have advanced sign-ups versus only when you're there. You mentioned something about three songs versus just one. So if they haven't really done much open mics, what are the differences between them generally? Dan, start with you.

Dan Magnolia:     So, Ginny Hill, who is the singer in The Perfectionists, she has a new open mic. She relaunched the South House one in DC. So she came out to check out mine and asked me some questions and sort of get the idea. And what I told her was that every open mic reflects the host and the neighborhood. So you can have the same host in a different neighborhood, like I did. I used to do the Marble and Rye one in Arlington. And now I have one in Vienna. It does reflect my personality, but it also reflects the neighborhood. So, it's kind of an organic thing that develops over time.

Brian:     Got it. Now, is it always music? On all three of your open mics, is it welcome to any kind of art? I mean, poetry and rapping and all of that, or is it just music?

Paige Powell:     I've had a couple of poets come in. Although they're rare. The last open mic at the Church of Clarendon, we had someone who wanted to come and do a couple rap songs, and actually it was ideal to fit him in. I asked him if he could do a rap song while we were setting up for the next person who had a keyboard, and it was gonna take a few minutes, and he had it. He had a rap song that would fill that space. And another thing that's different between the two open mics that I host, one's real quiet. People listen to the music. There's candlelight and tablecloths and all that. And then over in Greenbelt at the New Deal Café, I mean everybody's talking. It's a noisy place. You just have to do your best to get people's attention.

Brian:     Got it. So it's that vibe can change, but really it sounds like at all three of yours, any kind of talent that you want to showcase, it really is an open mic. It's not just the music, it's an open mic for whatever you want to do.

Dan Magnolia:     Yeah, absolutely.

Alex Parez:     Yes, sir. For sure. Anything you want to do, come do it. That's legal.

Brian:     Now how far ... You said advanced sign-ups. How far in advance do people sign up?

Dan Magnolia:     So, the way that I do it, especially because it's unique in that it's not every week, so I will do it on the Wednesday before the next open mic, so that people don't have any confusion about when it's supposed to be, because if you give people too much time, then they forget or they might just freak out and not come, so you want to give them enough time that they can sign-up comfortably, but you don't want to give them too much time that they just end up forgetting about it.

Paige Powell:     Dan's right. About a week.

Brian:     And this isn't like an online sign-up thing.

Dan Magnolia:     Mine is, yeah.

Brian:     This is like in person, or it's online as well?

Dan Magnolia:     Mine is, yeah. I use a service called Calendly. I forget how you spell it. And I can specifically put the day and the time slots, and people will go in and they will pick a specific time that they want, and it actually reminds them twice, so it will remind them a couple of days in advance and then like eight hours in advance.

Brian:     Wow. That's very sophisticated, Dan. I love it. Do you guys, I take it, it's the sign-up in advance, but probably in person, or do you guys have an online thing, too?

Paige Powell:     Old fashioned email with me.

Brian:     Excellent. All right. Send an email. Alex, I'm taking it, show up and sign up, right?

Alex Parez:     Yeah, just in person. I've kept the same format as we had at Iota open mic. Just show up and I promise I'll get you up on stage.

Brian:     We'll figure it out.

Dan Magnolia:     It's true, because I've come very late on his and he's always gotten me on. Alex, you also do something else that's unique at yours. You do the lottery.

Alex Parez:     Yeah, yeah. With numbered guitar picks, so that it's kind of even Steven and it's not, "Oh you've got to hurry up and get here and sign up, so you can pick your spot." This way it's fair and square.

Brian:     So everybody puts-

Alex Parez:     You get what you get.

Brian:     Everybody puts their name on the list and then you draw for your order.

Alex Parez:     They're numbered guitar picks and we put them in a sack. You pull out a guitar pick. That's the number you go.

Brian:     Oh, cool.

Alex Parez:     I write your name on the chalkboard.

Brian:     That's awesome. And see, I love all the different personalities because everybody has one. I mean, I've heard great things about Ginny Hill's thing at South House, too. Now if somebody's looking for where do I find open mics, I'm gonna share these links on the page because I know Dan sent me there's a couple Facebook groups that talk about this stuff, but if somebody has never been to an open mic or they want to find these, where would you guys say is the best place to find them if you're looking for them?

Dan Magnolia:     I publish my open mics on two places, two websites specifically, which is openmicsDC.com I think, and then there's Open Mikes, like M-I-K-E, like the person's name, M-I-K-E.org. You know, it's up to each host to make sure that they're up to date. So, there's always that, but I try to keep mine up to date. There's a ton of others out there that you can actually sort by city. So even if you're looking for something outside of DC in other areas, they have those as well.

Brian:     Wow. Paige, what about you?

Paige Powell:     I would say especially if you're a songwriter, go to SAW.org.

Brian:     Yep, got it. And that is the Songwriter's Association of Washington.

Paige Powell:     That's right.

Brian:     And that's where you can find ... That'll be where you'll find yours and some other ones. I'm assuming they sponsor several.

Paige Powell:     Oh, many.

Brian:     Many in the area.

Paige Powell:     They've got like nine or 10 every week.

Dan Magnolia:     Actually all of mine, too.

Brian:     There you go. And Alex, any other ideas for where to find open mics, aside from those places?

Alex Parez:     No. I think you got it covered.

Brian:     We got a good place. Obviously social media would be another place to find out about them, too.

Alex Parez:     Social media, Facebook. There's the open mic listings on Facebook. The old Iota Facebook open mic page is still there. I update it regularly and put all kinds of stuff on there.

Brian:     Got it. All right. Now, what's ... We don't have too much more time on the interview, but my favorite question to ask and I don't want to miss it because I love asking this question, and that's for each of you. Let's start with down with you, Dan. If you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be?

Dan Magnolia:     Well, since we're talking about open mics in general, I think one thing that I would give people who are hesitant about open mics. Let's say that you're new to performing and you're not quite sure that you're ready or something is keeping you from doing it. My big advice to those people is always no one to date, as far as I know, has ever died of embarrassment. So no matter how bad you bomb, it's not gonna be the end of the world and you just go out and you try again the next day and the day after that, and the day after that. And you're just gonna get better and nobody's gonna remember how badly you bombed maybe that first time.

Brian:     I love it. You've never died from embarrassment. I love it. So, go try it. Dan says just go for it. Paige, what about you?

Paige Powell:     Yes, I would definitely say it's okay to just come and do one song. If you're not sure, just come and just attend. Just check it out. And sometimes you'll come and you'll say, "Gosh, I think I'm a little bit better than that guy over there that really bombed."

Brian:     Yeah, okay. I don't want you to compare each other to the worst.

Paige Powell:     We shouldn't. We shouldn't. And another piece of advice that I'd like to give everybody is that people are more important than things. And people are more important than your song. You've got to remember that you're singing to people.

Brian:     Yeah, so make sure you entertain. Include them. Talk to them.

Paige Powell:     Yeah.

Brian:     I love it. Alex, what about you, man?

Alex Parez:     I would definitely reiterate what Paige said earlier. Just into the open mic and checking it out first. I did that when I was first starting to play out. Went and checked out the Iota open mic, and the next week I went and played it, and then it turned out to be one of the owners' birthdays, Steven, and he was there. And all the other big hot shot local bands and musicians were all there. You want to talk about nerveracking experience? Having to play in front of those people for the very first time, that was my wonderful experience, but then I wound up hosting that open mic and working at Iota for over three years, and it turned into something really cool.

Brian:     So, go check it out first. You can always go observe first and then come back and do the performance. Now, really quickly, just share with folks where do they find, because we've got to jump back into the music, but where do we find, if they want to follow your open mic specifically, is there a Facebook group or where do they find about you specifically? Dan?

Dan Magnolia:     You can find me on Facebook at Dan Magnolia Music, but I also have a specific page for the Black Squirrel, which is Black Squirrel Music, and Black Squirrel VA is the restaurant slash bar's page, as well.

Brian:     Got it.

Dan Magnolia:     But I just want to point out one last quick note, and that I think a lot of people might gloss over for open mics is I think open mics are equally three parts, which is entertainment, practice, and networking. And I think a lot of people who are new to open mics or don't quite get them always neglect the networking aspect of it, and that is super important to be part of the music scene.

Brian:     Nice. I love it. And Paige, where do they find your open mic if they want to follow you specifically?

Paige Powell:     PaigePowellMusic.com.

Brian:     There it is. And Alex?

Alex Parez:     AlexParez.com or the old Iota Facebook page.

Brian:     And we should note that it's Alex, Parez is P-A-R-E-Z, right?

Alex Parez:     For sure.

Brian:     Alex Parez.

2/6/18 - Special Guest: Ian MacKaye of Dischord Records, Fugazi, & Much More

What an honor to have Ian MacKaye co-founder/owner of local DC independent recording label, Dischord Records, with us in the studio this week!  SCROLL DOWN to see the video, info, and transcript

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. Trans Am, by Teen Idles 
  2. Waiting Room, by Fugazi 
  3. King of Kings, by The Evens 

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


NEW MUSIC RELEASES


NEW VIDEOS

Our ‘DC Artists Official Music Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70kU0_uB-sdviWajkbzi2Akr


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Check the calendar, linked below, for the full list!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Fri Feb 9
Aztec Sun @ Pearl Street Warehouse by the SW Waterfront

Sat Feb 10
--@ The Hamilton by Metro Center - Love Songs: the Beatles Vol 5 ft Ken Wenzel, The Cowards Choir, and the 19th St Band up in the Loft
--Turtle Recall @ Whitlows in Clarendon, VA

Wed Feb 14
Uptown Boys Choir @ Pearl Street Warehouse by the SW Waterfront in DC

Thu Feb 15
Black Dog Prowl & Technicians @ The Black Cat on 14th St in DC


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Ian MacKaye 

VIDEO - BIO - LINKS - TRANSCRIPT

Bio:

Ian MacKaye.jpg

Ian Thomas Garner MacKaye is an American singer, songwriter, guitarist, musician, label owner, and producer. Active since 1979, MacKaye is best known for being the frontman of the influential hardcore punk bands such as Minor Threat, and post-hardcore bands such as  Embrace and Fugazi  He is a co-founder and owner of Dischord Records, a Washington, D.C.-based independent record label.  He started it as a teenager in 1980 with partner Jeff Nelson. Their original intent was simply to release a single to document their recently defunct band, at the time, the Teen Idles. However, the label has since gone on to release music from more than 60 bands, with more than 160 albums.  

More resources about Ian:
Dischord Records: https://www.dischord.com/band/ian-mackaye

Ian band.jpg

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Ian MacKaye:     The Teen Idles, which is I-D-L-E-S idles, and after a year of playing, we put out this first record, which I think this track is from.

Brian:     There it is. Let's do it. This is Trans AM from Teen Idles and the album Self Titled, Teen Idles.

[Plays Song]

Ian MacKaye:     Alrighty then.

Brian:     There it is.

Ian MacKaye:     First off, I should say that there's no self titled album. This is a seven inch. This is Dischord number 100'd, and this is not even actually their first record. This is ... When that song was record, it was actually our first recording. It was done at Hit and Run studios in Rockville, Maryland. It was done the Spring of 1980. It's a demo version that we just sat on for decades and we finally put it out to celebrate Dischord number 100. It's a seven inch. It's a six or eight song seven inch and that song Trans AM actually was a slinky song originally. That was one of the songs ... Yeah, yeah. So, I wrote that with my friend Mark Sullivan. It's funny you played that of all songs. That one's actually even before the record. That's not even the first Dischord record. That's like our first demo. It's probably my first recording session, ever.

     That was in the Spring of 1979 and it was weird to go into a studio. First off, we were not a particularly accomplished band. We were kids trying to figure out how to play instruments. Going to the studio was exciting, it was also rather humbling, because you don't know ... You just don't know what you're going to come out with and I think that situation, it's funny when I hear that. Like, I love it now, 'cause I have this perspective, but at the time, I think that's not the way it feels to me when I play it in practice. That's not the way it feels to me when we played it live. That's one of the issues with recording. Sometimes recording, it's like the wrong mirror. It gives you the wrong reflection. That's why it's very important to find studios that really actively try to support your vision with what it is you're trying to do with your music. It's a funny track to play. It's appropriate in one sense, but it's also funny, because it's even more rudimentary than I was expecting. It's funny.

Brian:     Right. I mean, it's way back in the beginning, which I guess is ... And, you know we talk about in the beginning. I've been wanting to ask, can you describe the scene when you decided that Dischord records was going to become like, we're going to put out a label, can you tell that story? Were you sitting in a garage with, his name was Jeff, I believe-

Ian MacKaye:     Jeff Nelson.

Brian:     Whose idea was it? Like, you said "Oh, let's do it" and Jeff was like "Okay", or how did actually it come around?

Ian MacKaye:     Well, earlier in the show I think I was just saying that Teen Idles had at the end ... We had this tape, we had this money. We thought well, we can split the money up or make copies of the tape just for ourselves, or we can document it. It was a band decision to use that money to put out this first record and ask I think we talked about earlier, there's no other label in the world that was going to put out our record. Why would they? I mean, why would they put out our record? It's ridiculous. We were some little bunch of kids from Washington, DC, and I have to tell you that Washington, DC was ... I mean, it was a convenient stop for bands that were playing in New York, but that's about it. There was no ... I mean, can you name for instance, a rock band from the 1970's that really identifies as Washingtonian?

Brian:     I would say not many. I mean, it seems like punk and Go-GO are the ones that identified DC, but the other ones tend to shy away.

Ian MacKaye:     That's right, but did you know for instance, like members of Jefferson Airplane went to Wilson? People who came out of ... There's a lot of great music in the Washington history, but for some reason, I think people who are living here, they play music here until they could get out. I think it really has to do with the fact that the town does not support, as a whole, there's no industry here. If that's the way you think about music, you can't really be supported. That's the way this town works. Now, in the Go-GO situation, they're super regional and they made it work. The Go-Go guys, they really created something that was regular, they were tenacious about it, and they were so localized they couldn't really get out of Washington. Go-Go has never really taken hold anywhere else with the exception of maybe Hampton Roads down there and Virginia Beach down that way, and maybe somewhere in North Carolina, a little piece of it or something, but by in large, all Go-Go bands come from Washington DC, or the surrounds, right? That's just the way it is.

     Go-Go music was much more difficult to take out on the road. Punk bands, conversely, we lived to go on the road, and if you're from DC, you had a chip on your shoulder, 'cause you're the people that didn't move to New York, right? Like, everybody said you gotta move to New York. People would tell me-

Brian:     It's true, yep.

Ian MacKaye:     I mean, straight up. There was a guy. He had a store right near here as a matter of fact, in Arlington, and he told me "If you want to be in a punk band, you have to move to New York City." That's crazy. That's crazy to tell someone who wants to create that you have to move to New York or somewhere else to create. That is nuts. Creativity, passion, boredom, anger, expression. These are not geographic terms. These occur in all places. So, I think our position was, and again, as I mentioned earlier, we were in high school. So, we weren't moving anywhere anyway, I mean, I was an elder and I was 18.

Brian:     We'll be here and we'll do it-

Ian MacKaye:     Right. So, we're going to make it happen here. That was the thing about punk. Punk gave that permission. When I saw the Bad Brains, I mean, my god. What an incredible band. Or, the Slickee Boys, a phenomenal band. There were bands like The Razz, there were bands you know, The Urban Verbs, and White Boy. There's all these bands that you would see and they were just great bands, and we were just like that's ... We don't need to move anywhere, all the music is here. The thing is, if you identify as a punk, for instance, or a new waver, at that time, if you wanted to see them ... You could listen to records, but if you actually wanted to see it, you had to see local bands. Those bands that took that form, 'cause there weren't that many bands of that ilk touring, right? So, if you wanted to see punk or new wave music, the bands who were playing it were local bands. So, it developed into a really hyper-local scene.

     I think it's worth pointing out. This is a very interesting and weird factoid, but by the late 80's, the DC music scene, the punk scene was so strong that touring bands had to open for local bands.

Brian:     Wow.

Ian MacKaye:     That's for real. The touring bands would open for the locals, because the local bands had the following. Now, this also had to do with the fact that there was no radio here. There was no punk or new wave radio, so you only knew about bands through record stores and friends talking about records, or magazines.

Brian:     Oh, that makes sense.

Ian MacKaye:     But, the bands you saw and heard all the time were local bands. So, they developed these devout followings. So, you had bands like Artificial Peace, and Marginal Man, and Government Issue, and Scream, and I could just name ... Black Market Baby, I could go on, and on, and on with these names, but those are the bands we went to go see. So, if a band was touring and they wanted to play a show in DC, they would open for these bands, because these were the bands that were ... So, Washington is a fascinating town. It's a fascinating town, because there's so much emphasis on the federal government that there's this shade that's created, and what grows in the shade? Something nutritious and profound. It may not be marketable necessarily, but man, it's something good-

Brian:     I love that phrase, "What grows in the shade?" Yep.

Ian MacKaye:     Yeah, it's something good, you know? My father told me, he said that DC is the town where movements are started, and New York is the town where they're sold.

Brian:     Got it.

Ian MacKaye:     Right?

Brian:     It makes sense.

Ian MacKaye:     So, I think that in way, so the idea that you can actually present a new idea here, you could have a new idea and you could work on it, and no one's racing it to market, but if you're in other places like in New York of Los Angeles, anywhere the entertainment industry is really strong, the moment you have anything that could be potentially sold, somebody's try to sell it for you. But, here, people just ignore you.

Brian:     That's really, I mean, true of the local music scene today. There's so much great ... I mean, we've got 300-400 bands in the database of local artists, and most folks don't know about them. So, it's kind of what we're doing with DC Music Rocks, but it's also true of the DC scene, which is there's beautiful art, and beautiful music that's available here, and you have to find it.

Ian MacKaye:     And, theater. My god, there's a profound theater community here, there's great art here, and I'm not a booster. Don't get me wrong. I come at this weird. I'm a fifth generation Washingtonian, so, I know this town. I know the sights, the smells, the rhythms. This is where I choose to live. My family's here. I don't think this is the greatest place in the world. I don't think like that. I think that wherever you wake up is probably okay. You know? If you're waking up, you're in better shape than most, when you think about it.

Brian:     That's a really low bar, Ian, but I love it.

Ian MacKaye:     Yo, that is the highest bar.

Brian:     True.

Ian MacKaye:     Every day's a good day in the land of the living, right? So, that's the highest bar. So, I feel like because I'm here though, I want to make good music, or be a part of music. Music speaks to me and I should point out, by the way, two things [inaudible 00:10:44] I think it's worth pointing out, 'cause I use the word "Punk" all the time, and I just want to define it for people. That might be helpful, 'cause punk obviously has a lot of different definitions. There is clearly a sound or a look that is associated with punk, an attitude that has been associated with punk. These things are ... There's some general kind of consistency, but largely, it's geographic. So, someone in one place may be a punk that I don't think is very ... They may do things that I think are just, I think they're just jerks. They might think it's punk and I don't think it's punk. I'm like the punk that doesn't do vandalism, doesn't do graffiti. I'm the guy that doesn't get high, didn't drink. I didn't steal. Other people think it's punk to steal, I don't. I think it's greedy to steal-

Brian:     I think that's where the term straightedge came from, right? If you look online, you're kind of associated with that term?

Ian MacKaye:     Well, I coined it. I wrote the song.

Brian:     Was that in an interview? No, it was the song.

Ian MacKaye:     I wrote a song called Straightedge in 1980, yeah.

Brian:     And, it became a movement in the [inaudible 00:11:50]-

Ian MacKaye:     It became a movement that I'm not a part of that movement, but I wrote a song about the fact that in the 70's while everybody was partying, I didn't drink, or get high, and I didn't want to, and I was ridiculed by my friends. So, I wrote a song about my right to live my life the way I want to. That's it. Ironically, my probably all time favorite musician is Jimi Hendrix, and there's a song called A Six for a Nine by Jimi Hendrix, and in that song, the tail of that song he says, "I'm the one who has to die when it's time for me to die, so let me live my life the way I want to" and I thought, "I agree with him." So, even though it could be argued that he was singing about being a freak, or getting high, or whatever, 'cause clearly he used a lot of drugs, it's what killed him. What I heard was the right to decide how someone wants to live his or her life. That's what I was singing about and it became, when I wrote this song, it resonated with so many kids around the country. I was surprised, actually, that it did.

     Then, out of that, it started to develop into, actually ironically, first there was a reaction. There was a thing called the bent edge movement. So, I wrote this song called straightedge and we were on tour, Minor Threat, and we get to a town like Phoenix, Arizona, and a gang would show up, and they were identified as bent edge, and they tried to beat us up. They thought we were a straightedge gang. We weren't a gang. We were just a band and I was singing a song about my right to live my life the way I want to. So then, later, a straightedge movement formed that was actually ... We say movement, it wasn't organized. There wasn't meetings or anything, but there were people who really felt like this was a ... Religion is too strong of language, but it was a code of behavior that they defined, and then they tried to hold other people to. That is contrary to my point, which was people should be able to live their life the way they want to.

     Having said that, I stand behind the lyrics. I still live my life the way I want to. I still don't drink. I still don't get high. It was just never something I was interested in. I don't think poorly of people who do. People I love the most in my life certainly do. It's not an issue. If they're destroying themselves and I'm worried about them, that would be true if they either were using heroin or a hammer. Either way, I would tell them that's probably not a good idea. But, going back to this thing about this definition of punk. About five or six years ago, I thought my definition of punk is, it's the free space. What I mean by that is a place in which new ideas can be presented without having to serve profit. So, this is interesting. If you're an artist or a musician and you have a new idea, you make sounds that no one's heard before, good luck getting a gig at a local club, because local clubs, they are a business. Usually they're a bar and bars require clientele. Our audience is their clientele. So, if you have a new idea, what's the audience for a new idea?

Brian:     Zero.

Ian MacKaye:     Right, 'cause it hasn't been thought of, yet.

Brian:     So, you have to build it, which is a challenge.

Ian MacKaye:     Right. So, punk for me was an environment where people gathered and said "Give us your new idea". It didn't matter. People think of punk like ... When I was going to see shows, it wasn't just a bunch of guys with Mohawks beating the crap out of each other. I was seeing crazy stuff. I saw people playing on kitchen equipment. I saw people ... Just so many weird performances and really, they were challenging our ideas of formality, and formality is precisely the ideas that need to be challenged. You want to play a song?

Brian:     I do. I want to play one and I want to hear about life now today for you, but first I want to play, this is one of those songs that goes way back to ... Many people know this one, but I want to share it with the listeners who might not know you and this one. It's the Fugazi song, I want to play Waiting Room and have you talk about it, but here's the song Waiting Room by Fugazi.

[Plays Song]

     And, that was Waiting Room by Fugazi. While the song was playing, you mentioned a funny mashup. You were saying-

Ian MacKaye:     Oh. Someone did a mashup on line, I'm sure you can find it. A Destiny Child's song called Independent Woman and they've taken the two songs and put them together, and made it ... It's pretty incredible sounding. They did a really, really good job. I like when I hear that kind of stuff. I like people messing around, taking ingredients and making something new. I think it's fascinating.

Brian:     It kind of goes back to that mindset about punk, right? You're doing something different that-

Ian MacKaye:     Of course.

Brian:     ... Didn't exist before, so trying something new.

Ian MacKaye:     Right, you know.

Brian:     I do want to hear aBout life today for you today nowadays. What part of the city are you in? What is a regular day in Ian's life like now?

Ian MacKaye:     I live in Mount Pleasant. I've been there for 15 years. I have a nine year old son. Amy and I have a nine year old son. I still work at the label pretty much every day. I mean-

Brian:     Where is that located? [inaudible 00:17:28] record label?

Ian MacKaye:     It's here, it's here. Still in Arlington. Dischord House is still ... I mean, we moved in Arlington. I mean, I grew up in Glover Park in DC. Then, when I was 19 years old, and we all graduated from high school, and we were just kind of living at home. Our parents were about to say "You know, if you're not going to go to college ..." It's all right. We'll find a spot. We also needed a place to practice.

Brian:     That makes sense.

Ian MacKaye:     We needed a house that was detached, right? Because, you're going to make music and I grew up in a row house, and you can't do that there, be that loud, you know? 'Cause, people complain. It had to be cheap, 'cause we were broke. Super broke. We were high school kids. I mean, a year out, I had a little bit of money, but I was working at that time in a movie theater and an ice cream shop in Georgetown. Then, it had to be relatively safe, because we knew that when we opened this house up that all the other punk kids would come hang out. They were all still in high school. So, they could be 14, 15 year old kids, and they would come to wherever we are. We'd be a place that kids would go hang out. So, we had to be in a neighborhood that was relatively safe. Especially at that time. We were punk rock kids and though it's, I mean, I wish in a way I could somehow illustrate to people, or give people some sense of how much the other we were at the time. I mean, it's cliché to talk about people jumping out of their cars and trying to beat you up for the way you looked, but that was a reality.

     So, we found this house. It's ironic actually, we looked in a newspaper under houses for rent, and we found this house over in Lyon Park here in Arlington. It's the first house we ever looked at. We walked in and I remember there's some college dudes there and I go "What's it like living out here?" They were like "It's cool." I'm like, okay. We kind of looked around like [inaudible 00:19:36], none of us had ever gotten a house before, we didn't know what was involved. Then, the landlord came. It was an independent guy and he brought this lease. I said, "Oh, I don't know if..." I just took a pen and drew a line through one year and put six months, because I thought there was no way I was going to live for more than six months in this house. I just couldn't imagine being in Arlington for a year. It seemed crazy. A year is too much. At that point, it would've been the 18th of my life, right? So, I ended up living there for 21 years.

Brian:     Wow.

Ian MacKaye:     Yep, and I bought it in 1994. So, it is still the house. It's still where the label is based. We have a separate office where the actual work is done, but I still work out of the house. So, I come out here four or five days a week. Practice four days a week in the morning, I play with Amy and Joe in the morning. We have a new musical project. We don't have a name, like I mentioned earlier. So, we practice from 9:30 till noon. I play guitar. I write all the time, just always. I don't finish things, but I always riff. Just write, write, write, write. I do a lot of time studying. I'll listen to music. I study music. I read stuff. I'm always thinking about things. And, I do a lot of interviews like this. I do a lot of talking.

Brian:     When you say studying, does that mean studying to play the songs, or are you studying different kinds of music for influence? What do you mean by studying?

Ian MacKaye:     Some years ago, I stopped saying that I listen to music. I say I study it, because I take it seriously. When I say study it, I mean, I can't play something honestly. My best way ... I can't read music, I've never been able to read music really, and I can't ... Unlike other people I know who I really very much respect, I can't listen to a song and play it. I can't do it. Now, I can understand the movement of the song, and I might be able to replicate it, but I could never do what people do, like if I hear someone else do it, I can't do that. The general shape, the chord changes, I can figure out by ear, but that's what I can play. I have relative pitch. So, if you get me started, I can go from there. But, I know people who can listen to a record and just play it. Blows my mind. I am not one of those people. But, when I say study it means that I think about music and I go in deep. I study it.

       So, I might go into ... Like, some years ago, maybe 15 or 20 years ago, I went to a Fela Kuti study. He's a Nigerian musician and I studied, and studied, and studied. I listened and studied. And, I'm still studying Hendrix. Today, on the way out here, I was listening to a bootleg recording of just him in the studio working out ideas, just him talking to the engineer, trying something out, and talking thread bare, but hearing him singing a song like Dolly Dagger in its infancy, when he's still working out the words and working out the ideas. I'm fascinated to hear how people work. It's just interesting. Also, I think this has to do with the fact that having played in some [music 00:22:55] for so many years, it's given me a new understanding of the process of what they're doing. I know what's going on now, so hearing people who before existed only in like a Pantheon, like Gods, now I understand the process. I'm like, well that is fascinating to hear ... To understand the genius that was at play there is mind blowing, you know?

      I stand in awe of great musicians. So, it could be Jimi Hendrix, or Fela Kuti, or Nina Simone. It could be Black Flag, who I think they're ... Like, it could be all these bands. I'm constantly ... I listen to all kinds of music. Someone said to me "What's your favorite genre? It must be punk?" I said, "No, my favorite genre of music is the music made by people who don't have a choice in the matter." That's the music I like. If it's a job that's fine, but I'm not that interested in it. But, if it's because you have to play, because something is buzzing in your head, and you gotta get it out of your head to go forward? I want to hear that song. That's what I want to hear.

Brian:     Right, I love that. So, I want to make sure that we say thanks and share with the folks, what is, if they're looking for ... If they want to follow what's happening at Dischord and the things that are happening with you, and over there, where's the best place for them to find that information nowadays?

Ian MacKaye:     I mean, I only just look at the web [inaudible 00:24:17], to me, because it's dischord.com, but I'm sure that if you go there, you'll find ... I don't pay any attention to social media stuff. I'm sure that they've ... I know that there are social media things. I don't really care about any of it, but I'm glad that it's there and people like it. Go have a look at it. Dischord D-I-S-C-H-O-R-D.com. That site, I mean it's been up for many, many years. I should say one thing, if you're interested in Fugazi, that one of the projects I worked on that I've been doing for last, well, it's been almost eight years now, is that we created the Fugazi Live Series, and this is a section of the Dischord website that we've created a page for every one of the thousand plus gigs we've played and of 900 of those things, we have recordings.

Brian:     Wow.

Ian MacKaye:     And, on every one of them there's information about the show, how many people were there, who played with us. If we have photos or other ephemera, ticket scans, or fliers, we'll post those things. For people who are interested, it's a deep dive, but it's there. I mean, it's an interesting project. I felt like we had the recordings, we had the materials, why? We weren't listening to this stuff. I was looking through this stuff, so let's make them available to people. What's interesting is even when you create a site of that magnitude, which is massive, the internet is a giant ocean. I don't think we even ... We don't even stand to be a fraction of a drop, but it's there if you give a damn.

Brian:     If you want to go find it.

1/30/18 - Special Guest: Eugene & Dion of the DC Music Video TV Show 'Display'

Thanks to Eugene & Dion, creators of the DC Artist Music Video TV Show 'Display' for hanging out with us in the studio this week!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. Vernacular(Blue), by Dior Ashley Brown (Hip Hop, Funk)
  2. Above It, by Tabi Bonney (Pop/Electronic)
  3. Money, by MICCA (Hip Hop)
  4. Blowing Smoke, by Carolyn Malachi ft Trey Eley (Jazz, R&B)
  5. Hate, by Eta Money Roe (Hip Hop)

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


ANNOUNCEMENTS

THE 'BLUES' GENRE PLAYLIST IS NOW PUBLIC!  
We’re continuing our work on good playlists for you, this one is for the Blues!  If you love the Blues, we hope you’ll follow this playlist and check out these artists, go see them live.  We’ll keep adding to this playlist as we find more great tracks!
https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/5z2JngeLwSQQQDwSPYGqeL


NEW MUSIC RELEASES

Our 2018 New Releases by DC Artists’ Spotify Playlist:
https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/7kbMQzbrQPisoJq5A76V3k


NEW VIDEOS

Exclusive WORLD PREMIERE - Carter Lou & The Project - Annabelle
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tfvlbkswnmw

Caz Gardiner - Everybody  
https://youtu.be/MfCyPwzJmR0

Our ‘DC Artists Official Music Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70kU0_uB-sdviWajkbzi2Akr


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Check the calendar, linked below, for the full list!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Fri Feb 2
Honest Haloway @ U Street Music Hall on U St
Black Masala @ Pearl Street Warehouse at The Wharf
Adwela & The Uprising @ Jammin Java in Vienna

Sat Feb 3
Feelfree & Nappy Riddem @ Gypsy Sally’s in Georgetown

Mon Feb 5
Backbeat Underground @ Kennedy Center Millenium Stage by Foggy Bottom

Tues Feb 6
Wanted Man @ Union Stage at The Wharf by Waterfront

Wed Feb 7
Kipyn Martin @ Pearl Street Warehouse at The Wharf by Waterfront


Patreon

Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
--Daniel Warren Hill    --David Mohl    --Eli Lev    --Sarah Byrne



Eugene Thorpe & Dion Dove of "Display"

VIDEO - BIO - LINKS - TRANSCRIPT

Display's Bio:

Eugene & Dion

"Display" was created in the spring of 2016 by Eugene Thorpe and Dion Dove. The show serves as a vehicle for DC area artists to have their work showcased as part of the DC Office of Film, Television and Entertainment. Airing on DC cable channel 16, Display illuminates DC in a different light, away from the Capitol Building and the National Mall.

The show features a very eclectic array of performers celebrating the abundant diversity the DC region has to offer.

Now in its fourth season, Display has been able to expand its audience by way of the RCN cable network. The show now airs in Chicago, Philadelphia, New York and Boston as well as Washington D.C.

Website:  https://oct.dc.gov/service/display

Link to Display S1 E1:
https://youtu.be/11AB8d9vwUM

'Display' Youtube Playlist (Watch all the episodes here, great for parties too, just let it run):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=11AB8d9vwUM&list=PL5Gt1jbf5xMz4nlynnBv9hiX9QOVJZk01

DC OCTFME Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/entertaindc/

Eugene Thorpe & Dion Dove pic

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:     On DC Music Rocks we're shining a spotlight on the great songs, artists, and incredible people behind the DC regions local music scene. Display was created in the spring of 2016 by Eugene and Dion of the DC office of music and entertainment. The TV show showcases the music videos of DC area artists. It airs on DC cable channel 16. Display illuminates DC's musical talent, leaving behind the politics and government and it celebrates the abundant diversity the DC region has to offer. So, now entering yet another season, the fourth season, Display's been able to expand its audience by way of the RCN cable network because it's now airing in Chicago, Philadelphia, New York, those other cities that they were just talking about. So, display is great things.  I met Eugene when my band Fellowcraft was fortunate enough to play on the show, The Sound, that he was talking about. It's a TV show and I met him either and he was talking about this music video thing and it was like, "Well, gosh, I have a whole collection of music video's. I've got a youtube playlist of more than ... I think I'm approaching 200 or more music videos by local artists. Hey we should collaborate," and we've been collaborating ever since.

Eugene:     And one of the reasons we came here was to personally say thank you.

Dion:     Much love. [inaudible 00:01:12] Much love.

Eugene:     That's funny because when we started this show I went to Dion and I said, "What if we put together a music video show?" He had shot some videos. He had made some videos. I knew a few guys who had made video's. So, I said, "What if we made a show out of the things that we had." So, we sort of counted them up and we had enough videos for one show. It was hilarious because we were like, "Okay, we're going to make this show but we're gonna make this show. We're gonna make the whole thing." So, we're actually sneaking into work early ...

Dion:     An hour early.

Eugene:     An hour early and shooting it while nobody's around.

Dion:     Right.

Brian:     Wow.

Eugene:     The thing I love about the first ... If you guys go on the website, you look at the first episode, there's a clock above Dion's head and as you can se us working through the show and it says, 8:02 and then it says 8:23, 8:47. So, as he's signing off it says, 8:53.

Dion:     We got to start work at 9:00am.

Eugene:     Right there. So, we would get right up to the end oof it ad so we did the whole thing. We put commercials in it. WE did the whole show as if it was already on the air.

Dion:     Right, the craziest part is we had to take it up to Miss Gates, to let her check it out. So, we would take it up there to her and Derrick, who's our chief of staff. We had to cut the lights off and try to set the mood. If we handed out popcorn that would have made it a little bit better. We had the lights off and we just put it on and just let the day face us more than anything and they was very appreciative of the show and man it's our full season now.

Eugene:     Yeah, and to Angie's credit, one of the first things she said when she came, was, "Look if there's something that we can put together, as long as it conforms to the rules and it doesn't get us in trouble, then let's go ahead and do it." So, I sort of looked at Dion and he looked at me like, "Okay, I got something for you," and we put the whole thing together and so we put it together. We kicked the names around. The name Display comes from Trouble Folk actually. When they used to come on they used to have a thing where they would say, "Who we gonna put on display," meaning, who are we gonna shine the light on. Who are we going to present to this audience? That's what Display means. That's where the name comes from.   So, once we explained that to here and she was like, "Okay. I like that. I like the way that goes."

Brian:     Who's idea was that? Was that you? Dion? Or was that Eugene? Who was that? Display?

Eugene:     That wasn't the first title. I forgot what the first one was but we sort of came around to Display because I think it was two words at first but then we sort of shortened it and everything but yeah that was the idea was to use that same thing that Trouble Folk did, where we gonna put these artists on display. We're gonna put these videos on display.

Brian:     That's awesome.

Eugene:     That's where the name came from.

Brian:     I get it now.

Eugene:     Yeah.

Dion:     Display.

Brian:     That's amazing. What is it that makes Display unique or different or ...

Dion:     The locals. The locals make it unique. The local music. The local clothing. The food that is in the videos, you know we like a lot of restaurants from the area and that's what make it unique rather than looking at a big video show and seeing all these spots you've already seen before. A lot of people haven't seen a lot of the shots that we have in DC. I feel that's a good look for us.

Brian:     I do have to say in some of the music videos, if you actually watch the videos you guys have and you watch, you'll see your neighborhood. You'll see places you've been. You were just there last night, it might have been a bar and alley. I used to walk down that alley on the way to get to somewhere. I'm mean there's so many places that come up in people lives in these videos too.

Eugene:     That's one of the things we wanted to key on was to look for videos that showed the city. That showed different parts of the city.

Brian:     Nice.

Eugene:     And amazingly, thanks to you, we were able to expand that and the thing that I lie about what we've been able to do over time is I think it's a real eclectic play list. You know what I mean?

Brian:     Oh, it is. You guys have a real collection.

Eugene:     It's a real range of things that are on there. There's a lot of different things on there and we don't ... It takes a lot for us to say no. Say, "Okay, we can't put this on." Almost anything else, we will try. We will try very hard to get it on and there's so many people that have messages and points. One of the ... Elena & Los Fulanos.

Brian:     Elana & Los Fulanos.

Eugene:     Los Fulanos, thank you. I love her videos. Her videos are so great because of the message. I watch the videos. I was like, "Okay, we got to put this on the show." This is important to put this on this show. You know what I mean?

Brian:     Yes. It's very current. I mean current events, stuff that's happening right now.

Eugene:     Right.

Brian:     It's true.

Eugene:     Right, and a lot of the videos are that and a lot of the videos have that. A lot of the videos are talking about current things and politics and we didn't want to shy away from that. We wanted to make sure that those videos had a place to be shown, a place for people to see them and for the points that they're making to get further out. That was a really important thing for us.

Brian:     That's amazing guys. Let switch the spotlight to you guys personally now. What are your DC connections? Have you guys always been DC? Did you come from somewhere? What part of the city are you in? You go first.

Dion:     I'm from here. My mother Robin [inaudible 00:07:17]. Hey mom. She from South East. My fathers from Uptown, fourth and [inaudible 00:07:22]. Hello. I grew up in Hillcrest Heights, right by [inaudible 00:07:26] avenue.

Brian:     Nice.

Eugene:     Which is ironic because that's where my wife grew up.

Brian:     Yeah, and now you've got this Display project together. You got a baby called Display together. There you go.

Eugene:     My wife grew up in the same place but I moved down here from Jersey when I was a kid in the fifth grade. So, I've been here ever since, okay.

Brian:     Okay. [inaudible 00:07:49] And what part of the city are you in?

Eugene:     I'm in Silver Spring. I've been in Silver Spring the whole time. It's been an interesting to be that close to a major city and to be close to this city in particular, I think was a real tremendous thing to grow up, to be in this particular place too. You can drive down North Capitol Street and you see the Capitol Building. You go, "Wow," you know what I mean? I used to trip out about stuff like that and just being able to see the government, you know, the official Washington DC, and then the neighborhoods of Washington DC. The city where everybody lives in Washington DC. So, it's been a terrific experience to be here, to come back to work here, and now to work as part of the city government.

Brian:     City government, absolutely. What are you guys ... On the personal side now, talk about outside of work. So, we know you do Display, and you work down at that OCTFME, the Office of Music entertainment. What outside of that? Hobbies? What do you guys do?

Eugene:     We work on a lot of music. In fact, that's how we got started. That's how we got started working together. We worked at the agency, and we had a Christmas party one year, and I was very new to the agency at the time. I had only been there about a year, maybe two years or so. So, it was still very new. I didn't know a lot of people at the agency. So, one Christmas party, this guy gets up and he performs this rap song, and I said, "This song is corny."

Brian:     Please tell me that was Dion.

Eugene:     It was Dion.

Brian:     Oh. So good. All right, corny rap. Dion. Really?

Eugene:     I was like, "You know what though I want to hear him really run, not in front of the boss" ...

Dion:     I had the boss there. I was really just PG. PG 11. It wasn't even 13.

Eugene:     Right. So, I was like, "I want to hear this guy really rhyme." We linked up that day and maybe two weeks to a month later, we started making songs.

Dion:     I actually did the theme song for the show.

Brian:     For Display when you watch the show. That's Dion.

Dion:     That's my voice you hear when we're coming on.

Brian:     What about hobbies do you guys like? Are you into TV or around town?

Dion:     Hobbies. We're pretty much into a lot of the same things and right now we're into movies. That's our next venture. We actually just won a film festival in DC. Gene was the editor. I was the sound man and the clapper and everything else.

Brian:     Little bit of everything.

Dion:     I was the director.

Brian:     Good gracious. Well congratulations, which film festival was that?

Dion:     The DC Independent Go Film Festival.

Brian:     Nice.

Dion:     We went to the Black Home Festival in Miami, came in the top 20. In Atlanta, we had the Peace Tree Film Festival but I missed the email, so we missed going to the event.

Eugene:     It was a 30 minute short film called Stay Tuned and it was a comedy, which to me made it interesting because you go to film festivals and all these things and everybody wants to be deep, you know, [inaudible 00:11:20] staring out a window for 20 minutes. So, the fact that we made a comedy and made people laugh. We were like, "If we made one person laugh, then we did it."

Dion:     The first person we showed was Angie Gates and if she didn't green light it we wouldn't have showed nobody but she laughed when it first came on and that gave us a little confidence to keep on rolling.

Brian:     I love how supportive she is. She's so supportive, her and mayor [inaudible 00:11:49], both of them.

Eugene:     Yes indeed.

Brian:     So supportive of the arts and stuff and people don't know that necessarily because it's such a government town but yeah, DC definitely has 202 creates. If you go to 202creates.com you'll see some of that stuff that they're doing with that local music. I just gotta get a shout out to both of them. I love that she green lit your little project and all that stuff. Eugene I want to give you a shout out too because you shared with me you made music on the side too. So, let me just play ... This is you right? This is some of the stuff you made.

Dion:     Give em something. Give em something.

Eugene:     Yeah, this is a ...

Dion:     Let it go. Let it go.

Eugene:     Yeah.

Brian:     Nice.

Dion:     That's geno right there baby. Sound good.

Brian:     So, you do that stuff and that's the music for Display. You use it around work?

Eugene:     The version 23 project, it began as a file really. A file in my computer.

Brian:     There were 22 not good versions. Keep version 23.

Eugene:     Right. Right.

Brian:     It takes practice guys. It takes practice.

Dion:     [inaudible 00:12:58]

Brian:     You want to know how long it took us to make an album, 23 times, that's how.

Eugene:     Exactly. That became just the file name and it was sort of an outlet just do the music that was sort of in between the beats that I was doing for Dion or the beats that I was doing for somebody else. I had a bunch of other stuff that I kept and some of it I use for whatever we're working on, some of the shows, some of the TV shows, some of the other things but it's something that, to answer your question, that is my hobby. That is definitely my hobby right there.

Brian:     You guys, my favorite question to ask is if you could offer one piece of advice what would it be?

Dion:     Oh man.

Eugene:     Eat before the gig. That's the first piece of advice somebody told me and I'm passing it on.

Dion:     My would be treat other people how you want to be treated.

Eugene:     For sure.

Brian:     Say more on that. What does that mean?

Eugene:     I mean however you want to be treated. If you go into a building and you see somebody the janitor or the president in the building treat both of them the same. Don't treat one of them no different than the other. If you treat both of them the same I'm pretty sure they'll treat you the same as well.

Brian:     That's awesome. Be nice. It's like that common stuff but people forget sometimes and so remember to be nice and eat before the gig.

Eugene:     Eat before the gig.

Brian:     Oh my god, I love it. All right. Now, for those folks who want to follow the cool stuff you're doing and more about Display and the show, where do they go?

Eugene:     The links for Display are on our YouTube on the agency ...

Brian:     Website.

Eugene:     Website. And the YouTube page ...

Brian:     What's the website?

Dion:     Entertain_@DC.

Eugene:     Entertain_@DC

Brian:     I think it's entertainment.DC.gov I think was the one.

Eugene:     Entertainment.DC.gov and then on our YouTube page under entertain_DC we have a YouTube page and all of the shows have their own tab so that you'll see a separate tab for Display and all of the shows, all three seasons are there.

Brian:     So, if you're listening I hope you go to YouTube. Type in entertain_DC and then go check out episodes of Display and watch all these amazing music videos that these guys have.

Dion:     Check us out.

Eugene:     And it's interesting because a lot of people have said that they just put he show on and just leave it like it's a regular show and they'll binge watch two or three of them.

Brian:     I feel like it's old school MTV when you used to have it on and that was your music and there's a video to go with it, you've got that.

Eugene:     And that was the idea. That was what we wanted to do and I also have a big shout out to our number one viewer and it's Dion's mom. That's Dion's mom.

Brian:     Hi mom. I love it.

Eugene:     Mr. and Mrs. [inaudible 00:15:51].

Brian:     I love it.

Eugene:     They sit in the house each Friday.

Dion:     A popcorn.

Eugene:     A thing of popcorn and they watch their son on the show.

Brian:     That's amazing. I love it.

1/23/18 - Special Guest: Turtle Recall

Thanks to Erin and Guido of Turtle Recall for hanging out with us in the studio this week!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. The Motions, by FeelFree (Reggae, Alternative Rock)
  2. DC Tour Company, by Turtle Recall (Rock/Punk)
  3. Time Bomb, by Bells and Hunters (Rock, Blues Rock)
  4. Fort Worth Lady, by Human Country Jukebox (Country)
  5. Vision Hazy, by Matt Tarka (Rock)

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


ANNOUNCEMENTS

Are you a parent?  Have a young niece/nephew/cousin?  Did you know DC’s local music scene has kid-targeted family friendly music?  We caught Rocknoceros at The National Theatre in DC on Sat Jan 20.  Picture kids everywhere dancing, mom’s dancing with babies, and even a few dads showing their moves!  Everyone was smiling and laughing, it was hard to believe we were in the middle of dc with demonstrations and a government shutdown surrounding us within 2 blocks.  Songs we caught included: What Is Your Favorite Animal,  I Wish We Used The Metric System, Harry Elephante, and The United States Of America (they named all 50 states). We have a profile for these guys in our DC Artist Database so you can catch them around, they play regularly in the area.  We hope you’ll bring the kids and check them out

Our Instagram, @dcmusicrocks, started 6 months later than our facebook, but just surpassed 1000 followers and is about to overtake our facebook presence!  On instagram each week, we post pictures of the artists we share on the show and include interesting facts about them.  We also share concert shots of artists we’ve featured on the show when we’re at their shows.  We’ll keep the good content comin!  If you don’t follow us already, we hope you’ll come join the fun!  Thanks for making us a part of your instagram!
https://www.instagram.com/dcmusicrocks/


NEW MUSIC RELEASES


NEW VIDEOS

Jonny Grave - Fever
https://vimeo.com/248904223

Ras Slick New Mini Documentary
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DB8LUwOa9sM

Our ‘DC Artists Official Music Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70kU0_uB-sdviWajkbzi2Akr


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Check the calendar, linked below, for the full list!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Fri Jan 26
-Exnations, My French Roommate, Mystery Friends @ Rock N Roll Hotel on H St in NE
-Justin Trawick Album Release Show @ Pearl Street Warehouse in SW at the Wharf

Sat Jan 27
-Elikeh @ Gypsy Sally’s & Scott Thorn @ Gypsy Sally’s Vinyl Lounge in Georgetown

Sun Jan 28
-Venn @ DC9 Nightclub by U St

Tues Jan 30
-Tomato Dodgers @ DC9 Nightclub by U St


Patreon

Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
--Daniel Warren Hill    --David Mohl    --Eli Lev



Turtle Recall

VIDEO - BIO - LINKS - TRANSCRIPT

Turtle Recall's Bio:

turtle recall pic.jpg

Turtle Recall is pop/folk/rock that does mashups and medleys of Top 40, Rock, 90s, oldies, and country. No backing tracks here tho it’s 100% live music and we bring the energy and the party to every show. We have two albums of original music including our own happy birthday song so we never get stuck playing that dirge. Featuring vocal harmonies and electric fiddle atop punk-inspired rhythms is sure to bring the hype.

Housy (john currie’s house) has had so many parties it has it’s own Facebook page and our new drummer Clayton hosts an annual open jam front yard party called Farmaroo that is attended by so many musicians it’s like having a legit cover band playing all day. Farmaroo IX is in May 2018. We are playing Clarendon Grill on New Year’s Eve!

Links:
www.turtlerecallmusic.com
@turtlerecallmusic

Turtle Recall pic.jpg
turtle recall pic.jpg

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:     So, on DC Music Rocks, we're shedding a spotlight on the great songs, artists, and incredible people behind the DC region's local music scene. Turtle Recall is a pope ... A pope. It's a pope. No, it's definitely not a pope.

Erin:     Could be.

Guido:     A religious band.

Brian:     Wrong. It is a pop/folk/rock ...

Erin:     All the above.

Brian:     ... band that does mashups and medleys of top 40 rock, 90s, oldies, and country. There's no backing tracks. It's 100% live music, and they bring so much energy with every party that they do. They've got two albums of original music, including their own Happy Birthday song, which I want to hear one day. I haven't heard that one yet. They feature vocal harmonies, electric fiddle, atop punk-inspired rhythms, which bring some serious hype to every show. I've seen them live, I've seen them do this, and it's phenomenal.

Guido:     Oh, thanks.

Brian:     So, I've been a fan for a while, and it's freakin' awesome to actually have you guys here. Thanks for doing this.

Erin:     Thank you.

Guido:     Your show's cool.

Brian:     Thanks guys. So now, first, actually let me ... Tell me about the name. Where does Turtle Recall come from?

Guido:     I like turtles.

Erin:     Well, basically, yeah. We like turtles. I think we ... There's been an inside joke between all of us since high school. Most of us went to high school together, South Lakes High School, in fact.

Brian:     Nice, okay.

Erin:     Yeah. We were all in different areas of the art wing.

Guido:     You were, like, chorus.

Erin:     Chorus.

Guido:     I was the band kid.

Erin:     Yeah. Then, Matt was-

Guido:     Orchestra.

Erin:     ... orchestra, yeah. I was also in the fine arts. I did actual, you know, painting.

Guido:     John-Currie's your theater boy.

Erin:     Theater. He's the thespian.

Guido:     The theater.

Erin:     Yeah. So, we all knew each other in different ways, which was really fun.

Brian:     How many of the ... Now, there's six people. Introduce the names and instruments in the band.

Erin:     We have John-Currie-

Guido:     He plays the bass and sings.

Erin:     Yeah. And this was his New Year's resolution, to start this band. So, he gets a lot of credit.

Brian:     When was that? What year was that?

Erin:     I don't know, two-

Guido:     Would've been January 1st, 2009.

Brian:     Wow.

Erin:     But I was not in the band back then though.

Brian:     Got it.

Guido:     Yeah, we didn't pick up Matt and Erin until 2010. That's really when the band started.

Erin:     Yeah, he suckered me into it later.

Brian:     Oh, that's awesome. All right.

Erin:     Yeah, and then we have Guido who also does guitar and vocals. We have Matt who we call the talent. He's on fiddle, but he also does sound, he does lights, he created this crazy light board, and he can stomp on it and change the whole vibe of the show whenever he feels like it. And he also does harmonies, so you can tell why we call him talent.

Brian:     Get out of here. God, talent, yeah, seriously. Okay.

Erin:     We have Sam who does lead guitar.

Guido:     And trying to keep his eyes open.

Erin:     That's another, yeah, another one of his tasks.

Brian:     Okay, we'll stick with guitar then. All right, he's lead guitar, and then there's got to be drums.

Guido:     Clayton.

Erin:     Clayton.

Guido:     We kind of have a running Spinal Tap joke almost with the drummers in this band. We've easily clipped a baker's dozen, but we're really, really happy playing with Clayton right now. He's a great guy.

Brian:     That's awesome. So, Clayton's the current drummer. And then, of course, Erin on lead vocals, and harmonies, and all kinds of magical vocal things, right?

Erin:     Vocals, yep. I clap in one song, so I would like to be known for that.

Brian:     I've seen you with a tambourine. Some tambourine action.

Guido:     She plays a mean tambourine.

Erin:     I've been known to tamb-o.

Brian:     Nice. I love it. Now wait, where was that ... So, for folks who don't know that school that you mentioned, where is that?

Erin:     Reston, Virginia.

Brian:     So, you're all local Reston guys.

Erin:     Yeah.

Brian:     Wow, that's amazing.

Erin:     Yeah. Can never leave.

Brian:     Now, what is it that makes ... If people go see a Turtle show, what makes a Turtle Recall show special from maybe some of the other shows they could catch?

Guido:     I mean, I guess I'd have to go back to sort of what you mentioned in the intro. I really think the fact that we do everything live. It's just six people, we're ebbing and flowing tempo-wise as necessary for the feel, we can go to the next thing, and you can just do things that you can't do when you have piped-in music.

Erin:     We're also constantly rotating music. We mix up old school stuff, like a lot of classic rock, with the newer pop music. So, it kind of hits every crowd, I think, which is really fun.

Brian:     Nice. I mean, I've seen ... They have a medley they do, which I'm inspired-

Erin:     We have a couple medleys.

Brian:     Well, it's a medley, but it's also, like, 40, 50, 60 minutes, something straight where there's no stopping all the way though.

Erin:     Yeah.

Guido:     I think we're almost up to an hour now, and it probably covers about 30 songs.

Brian:     Holy smokes.

Guido:     So, I'm not trying to encroach on power hour territory here-

Erin:     We're close.

Guido:     ... but if you wanted to drink while we change songs, I wouldn't hold it against you.

Brian:     Please say that next time you do it. That's actually a really fun drinking game.

Erin:     I'm pretty sure Guido did encourage that at the last show.

Brian:     Yeah? Okay. That's amazing. I love that idea. All right, so now, you guys have a lot of fun, and you know each other. So, talk about funniest moment that comes to mind with Turtle.

Erin:     Funniest moment?

Guido:     Yeah, I think I got a good one for this one.

Brian:     Yeah?

Erin:     Go for it, go for it.

Guido:     I believe it was at Level X Lounge. I don't even know if it's called that anymore. That's up on U Street. So, they had a movie on. It was probably a Cinemax movie or something. That movie ended, and they were still projecting that channel on the wall. We were playing, I think it was Magic, you know, that B.o.B song with Rivers on the-

Erin:     (singing)

Brian:     Nice, okay.

Guido:     Well, let's just say, Cinemax turns to other forms of entertainment at that time of night.

Brian:     So, you were playing the soundtrack to a very interesting display on the screen? No way.

Guido:     Particularly, you know, not-

Erin:     Graphic.

Guido:     ... just not the right song for, you know.

Erin:     It definitely changed the vibe of the whole thing.

Guido:     But I didn't even know it was happening at the time. Our friend had a video of us, and he kind of just panned to the left to it.

Brian:     Oh man, that's amazing.

Guido:     I saw it the next day.

Brian:     Little did you know, you guys became a backing band for incredible cinema experience? That's awesome.

Erin:     Yeah, I've always wanted to be famous for something like that, so I feel like we checked it off the list, you know?

Brian:     That's awesome. What about you guys on a personal side? So, outside of this music thing, what do you guys do? Are you hobbies? What do you do outside of that?

Guido:     Can I be, like, super DC right now because this is what I do with all of my free time. This is what I do to have fun. What I do during the day is I work for the Department of Energy.

Erin:     Boo.

Guido:     So, we can be super DC and, "What do you do for a living?"

Brian:     Got it.

Erin:     I think I just fell asleep.

Brian:     Oh, okay. All right. So, there's Department of Energy during the day, and then there's all this music stuff. And speaking of all this music stuff, share the other bands because you're in some other bands now.

Erin:     I think there's seven now? Guido, are there seven?

Brian:     Seven? Stop it, Jesus.

Guido:     You know, I'm kind of getting a lot of flack for this, you know. I may be on the easy side.

Erin:     But we love him the most. So, let that be known.

Brian:     All right. We'll share him then. What do you got?

Guido:     But I'm really excited about a new project I'm starting with Casey, formerly of Tempercrush, called Boayt, B-O-A-Y-T. We don't really have anything up yet, but look out because we've got, like, a discord feel coming.

Brian:     Oh, nice.

Erin:     Look out.

Guido:     It's along the high-energy vibe-

Brian:     Got it.

Guido:     ... again.

Brian:     And then I know there's Bells and Hunters too. We're going to play one of those songs coming up, so you get to taste that.

Guido:     Bells and Hunters is, like, second band family. I mean, I just love everyone, and that band is such a good group of friends.

Brian:     That's awesome.

Erin:     I can vouch for them all too. They're all great.

Brian:     That's amazing. What about you, Erin?

Erin:     Oh, I don't do much. No, I have a pretty big family, so I try to prioritize them. They all live back in the area now. I have a couple of nieces.

Brian:     When you say "pretty big family" and "they all", how many people are we talking?

Erin:     I have four siblings, and a mom.

Brian:     Four siblings including you, or that means five kids altogether?

Erin:     No, five total.

Brian:     Wow, okay.

Erin:     We're all musical, so we all like to sing together.

Brian:     Oh, that's adorable.

Erin:     We've been singing together since we were little. But I try to hang out with them as much as I can. I also have a small business of my own doing marketing, and websites, and graphics, and stuff like that. So, it's an aside.

Brian:     Nice, yeah, I know man, it's like-

Erin:     I ride my bike, you know. I'm really cool, so I just want everyone to know.

Brian:     I was going to say, speaking of all this stuff you're sharing, you do sound pretty freakin' cool, I got to say.

Erin:     I'm super cool.

Brian:     I love it. And this marketing thing on the side, if people want to know about that, do you want to share that, or is that-

Erin:     Sure. I guess I've never advertised for it before, it's all been word of mouth, and it's just been really fun for me. I mean, you could go to eringirardi.com if you want.

Brian:     Eringirardi.com.

Erin:     I've never said that out loud before, but it's a thing.

Brian:     That's Erin, E-R-I-N, and Girardi is G-I-R-A-

Erin:     A-R-D-I.

Brian:     There it is.

Erin:     Dot com.

Brian:     Eringirardi.com. Check it out. Check her out.

Erin:     I'm impressed that you even got most of the way there.

Brian:     I feel cool now, thanks.

Erin:     You are very cool.

Brian:     I appreciate it. All right. Now, what about ... One of my favorite questions to ask on these interviews is, if you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be? From both of you guys.

Erin:     Oh, man. I know Guido has better advice than I do. Be nice to people. That's my advice.

Brian:     Be nice? Say more on that. Where does that come from?

Erin:     No, it's hard. Are you talking about being in a band? Is that what your advice-

Brian:     It's up to you. You can answer however you like.

Erin:     It's hard. Everyone knows being in a band is hard. Creative people are very emotionally attached to the things they're doing, so it's cool to get a bunch of impassioned people in the same room working on a project, but sometimes, hard conversations have to be had. So, going into it knowing to be open-minded, and listen, and be gentle when you're talking about someone else's art I think is important.

Brian:     God, so true. So true. I like it. All right, be nice. What do you got, Guido?

Guido:     I would ... Maybe preaching to the choir with this audience, but go out and see your friends' shows. Go see strangers' shows. It's always really fun, and it's really inspiring to see what other people are doing. We just had ... I didn't know you were going until I saw you there, but we just saw Juxt last Thursday at Union Stage-

Erin:     True, and they rule.

Guido:     ... and master class in stage performance.

Erin:     Yeah, they were awesome.

Brian:     Nice.

Erin:     There was some rolling around on the ground, I mean.

Brian:     Oh, excellent. Any time it goes all the way to the ground, you know that's just-

Erin:     There was a jumpsuit involved.

Guido:     And you know roXplosion caught it.

Brian:     Of course, there's going to be pictures.

Erin:     And those pictures were pretty awesome.

Brian:     And if you don't know who they're talking about, roXplosion is a photographer in the scene. He takes some of the best photos, and he actually was one of the first DC Music Rocks episodes. So, you can go back in the archives to one of the very first episodes-

Erin:     Aw, Alec.

Guido:     Number one.

Brian:     ... and catch an interview with him because he is an awesome dude.

Erin:     Such a winner.

Brian:     We love roXplosion. That is it. All right, now, last little bit here. If they want to find out more about Turtle Recall and follow what you're doing, and where do they find this information?

Erin:     Turtlerecallmusic.com.

Brian:     Nice. And if you're on the social medias, what is it?

Erin:     We are Turtle Recall Music probably on all of them.

Brian:     All of them. Excellent.

Erin:     Yeah.

1/16/18 - Special Guest: Maxx Myrick, of DC Radio HD

Thanks to Maxx Myrick, Director of Programming for 96.3 HD4, DC Radio HD, for hanging out with us in the studio this week!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. The Towns, by Honest Haloway (Indie, Indie-Rock)
  2. The State of the Union, by Thievery Corporation (World)
  3. Fall Winter Spring Fall, by Carolyn Malachi (Jazz, R&B)
  4. Possibilities, by Bronsen and the Expedition (Pop, Funk)
  5. The Island (Comecar De Novo), by Lori Williams (Jazz, NeoSoul)

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


ANNOUNCEMENTS

Brian and DC Music Rocks were a feature story on an episode of the TV Show ‘The 202’ recently.  Brian’s interview aired and will re-air on the cable network DCN around the city.  We’ve also shared the link below, it starts around the 8 minute mark!  If you’ve ever wondered about Brian’s band Fellowcraft, they’re featured immediately after the DC Music Rocks interview so we hope you’ll keep watching for that too!
https://youtu.be/pJKIJbIlKa8?t=8m21s

We’ve expanded our partnership and DC Music Rocks product line with Amazon to include sweatshirts and hoodies!  So cool!
https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=w_bl_sl_s_ap_web_7141123011?ie=UTF8&node=7141123011&field-brandtextbin=DC+Music+Rocks


NEW MUSIC

Our 2018 New Releases by DC Artists’ Spotify Playlist:
https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/7kbMQzbrQPisoJq5A76V3k


NEW MUSIC VIDEOS

Backbeat Underground ft Aaron Abernathy - She Don’t Love Me (Like I Do)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EKITzKYXxU8

Our ‘DC Artists Official Music Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70kU0_uB-sdviWajkbzi2Akr


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Check the calendar, linked below, for the full list!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Jan 19 Fri
Carter Lou & The Project and Elizabeth ii @ DC9 by U St
Jonny Grave & Nah. @ Pearl Street Warehouse in The Wharf area by the SW Waterfront

Jan 20 Sat
AM - Rocknoceros Free show @ National Theatre by Metro Center
Wanted Man & Bottled Up @ Rock & Roll Hotel on H St NE
Sub-Radio @ Gypsy Sally’s in Georgetown

Jan 21 Sun
Kypin Martin @ Milkboy Arthouse in College Park

Jan 23 Tue
Maryjo Mattea @ DC9 by U St in NW
The North Country @ Gypsy Sally’s in Georgetown

Jan 24 Thu
Near Northeast @ Gypsy Sally’s in Georgetown


Patreon

Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
--Daniel Warren Hill



Maxx Myrick

VIDEO - BIO - LINKS - TRANSCRIPT

Maxx Myrick's Bio:

Maxx Myrick photo

Winfred “Maxx” Myrick was raised in Toledo, Ohio where he first went on the air at age 14 as a teen reporter at WKLR.  After High School and the Marine Corps, he enrolled at the University of Toledo where he began his career on college radio.  From there he worked his way up in radio markets including Cincinnati, Greenville, SC, Shreveport, Richmond, Cleveland, Pensacola, Washington, DC and New York.  In 1988 he was the first voice on the air doing midday’s at the launch of WVAZ in Chicago.  In 1990 Maxx and consultant Tony Gray signed on UAC WALR-Atlanta where he was the Operations Manager and Program Director and in 1993 he returned to WVAZ-Chicago as Operations Manager and Program Director until 2000 when he left to help launch XM Satellite Radio where he created the Real Jazz channel, programmed the Neo Soul channel “The Flow”, the Latin Jazz channel “Luna” and worked with and produced Wynton Marsalis at Jazz at Lincoln Center in New York City.  In 2008 he left radio for four years, finally returning to his true love in 2011 as Operations Manager and Program Director of Heritage UAC WHUR, the flagship station of the Howard University Radio Network.  Maxx is a divorced father of four wonderful adults Tondalaya, Khalfani, Akili and Nyasha Myrick.

Maxx Myrick Pic
Maxx Myrick

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:     On DC Music Rocks, we're shining a spotlight on the great songs, artists, and incredible people behind the DC region's local music scene. Maxx Myrick is an award-winning air personality, radio programmer, and content expert with over 40 years of experience, providing content on local and national levels. He's currently the talent buyer for Bethesda, Jazz and Blues Supper Club, and programming director for DC Radio, which is 96.3FMHD4 or dcradio.gov. His past experience includes work for XM Satellite Radio, like he just mentioned in New York City. He created the Real Jazz Channel and then he also was operations manager, and programming director at Clear Channel Chicago's WVAC and 106 Jams. Maxx is the recipient of every major radio award including Music Association's Icon Award and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the International Association of Black Broadcasters. After saying all that, it's just exciting that I met him, because through doing DC Music Rocks, my show airs also on 96.3HD4 on DC Radio and I was honored when I first got connected with him back when we were talking about doing that connection and having the episodes air. I've been working with him ever since and he's truly an incredible dude. I'm just honored that you'd be here and you'd do this with me, Maxx. This is exciting to have you on the show.

Maxx Myrick:     It's an honor to be here with you after listening to your show. It's an honor to be here in the studio with you.

Brian:     My goodness. Now, can you talk a little bit about we talked about Bethesda Jazz and Blues and we talked about DC Radio. Can you expand on those just a little? What's your involvement?

Maxx Myrick:     DC Radio, I've spent my career building radio stations around the country, Chicago, Atlanta, New York, DC. I was also at WHUR here in DC for four years prior to coming to the DC office of Cable Television, Film, Music and Entertainment, which is what DC Radio is a part of.

Brian:     Oh fantastic.

Maxx Myrick:     Extent of that wonderful brand, which also had the DC and television DK and television and DCC television.

Brian:     Wow. There's three channels. There's radio now. DC has really got a lot going on with the entertainment.

Maxx Myrick:     The office of film is in there as well, film, television, DC Office of Cable Television, Film, Music and Entertainment.

Brian:     It's the longest acronym.

Maxx Myrick:     It really is right.

Brian:     I know they must catch some heat for that. It's OCTFME.

Maxx Myrick:     OCTFME.

Brian:     All together. I met somebody and they're like, "No, it's music and entertainment. It's the office of music and entertainment."

Maxx Myrick:     That's what it is. I mean, we're trying to. Our goal is to give the people of DC a reason to stay here.

Brian:     Yeah.

Maxx Myrick:     We have the tools. We have a mayor and a director who are devoted to giving the citizens of DC an opportunity and that's what they're there for.

Brian:     Wow. The result is pretty amazing. If you check out some of the content you guys have, it truly it really is targeted for the local scene. Actually, talk about that. Talk about the station and what's on there.

Maxx Myrick:     Well, one of the shows that we cover of course is DC Music Rocks.

Brian:     Oh, you flatter me sir. You flatter me.

Maxx Myrick:     No seriously, when we were first trying to figure out, the station has governmental programming of course. We have a show with the Congresswoman Eleanore Holmes Norton. We have a show with the Metro Police Department. We have a show with the Mayor's Office, and Latoya Foster. We have shows with the business, different agencies. We also wanted to have an outlet for the local creative community. We've also created 202 Creates. That's part of our wheelhouse as well.

Brian:     Yeah, we've talked about that tagline on the show. Absolutely.

Maxx Myrick:     We wanted to also give the talent and the creatives in DC a place to get exposure. One of the first people that we reached out to was Brian Nelson Palmer, and DC Music Rocks because you play.

Brian:     I'm blushing over here. I'm blushing.

Maxx Myrick:     We have to service all eight wards and we have to provide programming for the entire city.

Brian:     Yeah.

Maxx Myrick:     Your program addresses that.

Brian:     It's true.

Maxx Myrick:     We were pleased that you said you would allow us to put your program on DC Radio.

Brian:     I am honored to be a part of the family Maxx. It really is a treat. Talk briefly about, you've got experience as a talent buyer now too. Is that like a side thing that you do, or how does that fit into the career?

Maxx Myrick:     It's a part-time thing I do? I've been in this business for 40 years.

Brian:     Yeah.

Maxx Myrick:     I've done all kinds of things. I've done small events, big events. When I was in Chicago, we used to do something called Unity Day, which was an annual free concert that was in Washington Park on the south side of Chicago. We had a million people show up every year.

Brian:     Holy smokes.

Maxx Myrick:     It was so big we had to film it from a helicopter. It was just crazy.

Brian:     That's a pretty big event. Oh wow.

Maxx Myrick:     We did other events and I'm used to doing big scale things.

Brian:     Yeah.

Maxx Myrick:     The same thing with the radio stations. All the radio stations that I've built have gone on to become big radio stations and that's the plan, to make this radio station, a station that the other cities want to have.

Brian:     Yeah.

Maxx Myrick:     We want to be the model for that. We have a very diverse array of programming for the artists, local artists and creatives and also we provide. Our goal is to be as transparent as we possibly can for the local government to give the local government a voice, to keep people informed.

Brian:     Yeah.

Maxx Myrick:     It's a combination of those things.

Brian:     Now, that kid of ties right into one of my next questions or the thing I love to ask too is so what makes DC Radio special do you think?

Maxx Myrick:     Well, first of all it's a local radio station. It's in DC, for DC.

Brian:     Yeah.

Maxx Myrick:     By DC.

Brian:     Yeah.

Maxx Myrick:     I mean, that right there makes it pretty special.

Brian:     In today's day and age of top 40 radio of national broadcast, that's definitely special.

Maxx Myrick:     I mean, radio has changed. It's very difficult for content to get on commercial radio. We're a non-commercial radio station. We don't have any constraints of commercials. We're commercial free all the time.

Brian:     Yeah.

Maxx Myrick:     We run long form programming. Our programs have depth. I mean, it's not just a little short interview. Our shows are hour and a half, hour and they're very diverse. We have as I mentioned earlier, world music programs. We got [inaudible 00:07:02] World Music Hour.

Brian:     Yeah.

Maxx Myrick:     We have a show called The Brazilian Hour that we do in conjunction with the Brazilian Embassy. We've got a few more surprises coming down the pike.

Brian:     Absolutely. I feel like this is something definitely to stay tuned because there's exciting things coming from you and what you got planned for DC Radio.

Maxx Myrick:     Oh yeah. We want to make it really big.

Brian:     Talk about your connection with DC. You've been in the scene for, you've been back and forth. You've lived here multiple times. What's your history with DC?

Maxx Myrick:     I was in Chicago. V103 in Chicago for about a decade.

Brian:     Okay.

Maxx Myrick:     Then, I had been studying technology. I've been in radio since I was 14, since I was in high school.

Brian:     Since you're like 21 now.

Maxx Myrick:     Yeah, so just a couple of years. The way I got started was back whenever that was, I would always be the DJ at my family's parties. I would go to the store and get, and so I was very fascinated by radio. I grew up in Toledo, Ohio, which is right next to Detroit, and also next to the Canadian border. We listened to Canadian radio, a station called CKLW, which was bigger than life, everything about it was just bigger. I was fascinated with that.

     Then, I high school I got an opportunity to go on the local radio station, the local FM because AM was still king at that time and do the high school update. Here's what's happening at all the high schools.

Brian:     Wow.

Maxx Myrick:     That was where I got bitten by the radio bug and then I went in the Marine Corp.

Brian:     Okay.

Maxx Myrick:     We were out overseas and on a ship, for like a year, in the Mediterranean. They had a ship's entertainment system.

Brian:     You were the DJ of that.

Maxx Myrick:     I of course was the DJ.

Brian:     I'm sensing a theme here. There's a lot of DJ. Bring it back then to the DC part.

Maxx Myrick:     What happened was I was in Chicago and I had been studying the technology.

Brian:     Sure.

Maxx Myrick:     I've seen the technology go from 45 to eight track, and then just all the way through.

Brian:     Yeah.

Maxx Myrick:     I had been studying satellite radio because I put the country's first satellite radio station on in Richmond, Virginia back in 1989.

Brian:     Wow.

Maxx Myrick:     It was what we did was we had a signal in Petersburg and then their station in Spotsylvania came on and interfered with our signal in Richmond. We bought the station in Spotsylvania. Now, then we took the signal, unlinked it in Richmond, and then we set it back down via satellite and then we increased our signal.

Brian:     That's right, okay.

Maxx Myrick:     That was the first satellite radio.

Brian:     First satellite radio.

Maxx Myrick:     You know, having been familiar with the technology when XM Satellite Radio was about to launch, a friend of mind contacted me and asked if I'd be interested in going. At a certain point in your career, you want new challenges.

Brian:     Sure.

Maxx Myrick:     I could see where that was going. I came to Washington DC and built The Real Jazz Channel. There's another channel called The Flow, which was the new soul channel.

Brian:     Wow.

Maxx Myrick:     Luna, which was the Latin Jazz channel.

Brian:     Good gracious.

Maxx Myrick:     I produced, Wynton Marcalis, Quincy Jones.

Brian:     Some of the jazz greats.

Maxx Myrick:     Yeah, and the whole station was done from a jazz fan's point of view.

Brian:     Sure.

Maxx Myrick:     Which is what they wanted. Then I stayed there for eight years, and then I took four years off.

Brian:     You took a break?

Maxx Myrick:     I took a break and moved to Nashville, Tennessee.

Brian:     I love it. That's a music fan's dream.

Maxx Myrick:     It was a music town, yeah. It's a music town.

Brian:     Good gracious.

Maxx Myrick:     Then, it was time to come back. I came back. Went to WHUR for about four years, and took another little break and then I got asked to come over and help build this radio station, so now we're blowing up here.

Brian:     I was going to say, I'm excited that you're here at the helm of this one now too. It's awesome that you came back. Now, talk to us outside of this work thing, what kind of hobbies do you got, your personal life and what kind of things do you do outside of work?

Maxx Myrick:     Besides music? I see a lot of live music. Of course, I book talent as well too and I play music on the radio, but I really like going to see live music. I'm a real music fan.

Brian:     What kind? I'm guessing jazz.

Maxx Myrick:     I like everything. I like jazz. I like EDM. I like world music. I like everything. I just heard, I went to see an artist from some island off of Finland. It was the most interesting music. I go to a lot of those embassy events.

Brian:     Sure.

Maxx Myrick:     They always showcase their countryman. I like that. I like traveling.

Brian:     Absolutely. Where have you been to lately?

Maxx Myrick:     I used to go to Brazil a lot.

Brian:     Nice.

Maxx Myrick:     It's been a while, but I think I'm going to reengage.

Brian:     Make a trip back there.

Maxx Myrick:     That country soon. Yeah.

Brian:     I like reengage with that country. Some people make a trip. Maxx chooses to reengage with that country. I love it.

Maxx Myrick:     I love the culture.

Brian:     That sounds like a much better trip, than just taking a trip, is to reengage with Brazil. It sounds so much better.

Maxx Myrick:     It's a wonderful culture.

Brian:     Now, one of my favorite questions to ask when folks are on the show, is if you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be?

Maxx Myrick:     Well, this is a tough business. It's gotten tougher over time because of various reasons. One thing somebody told me at the beginning was to keep your integrity. There's lots of temptations along the way.

Brian:     Like what's an example of that, when you say a temptation?

Maxx Myrick:     Well, I never succumb to the things that some people succumb to, sex, drugs and rock and roll.

Brian:     I see.

Maxx Myrick:     There are people who did and I saw people go down. I saw people's whole careers get ruined and then you have to be a stand up person. You have to be honest. You have to keep your integrity. The reason that I'm still in the game 40 years later is because I kept my integrity. I never sacrificed that. I never would do it.

Brian:     Don't sacrifice your integrity. Keep that.

Maxx Myrick:     That's a big that.

Brian:     Keep morals.

Maxx Myrick:     Then, stick with it. Right now, there's a wonderful opportunity for those who want to get into the business because we're at a paradigm shift with the internet.

Brian:     It's true. Tell a little bit about that.

Maxx Myrick:     Well, the technology keeps moving on but right now, the next superstars of radio are going to come online.

Brian:     It's true. Podcasts and some of that other stuff.

Maxx Myrick:     If you think about Apple Radio for example. They pay this guy from England all this money to be a curator. It's all online.

Brian:     It's all there.

Maxx Myrick:     If you can create something, as an individual, and generate enough interest, they'll come looking for you.

Brian:     That's pretty incredible. Maxx I like it. Now, one more time, for those folks who want to get in touch with you, or find out the cool things that you're doing with DC Radio and stuff, where do they go?

Maxx Myrick:     Just go to dcradio.gov.

1/9/18 - Special Guest: Caustic Casanova

Thanks to Stefanie, Andrew, and Francis of Caustic Casanova, for hanging out with us in the studio this week!

^^Episode Audio/Post Is Live - Click Above (might need to buffer/load, refresh page if you have any issues)^^

Podcast:  iTunesGoogle PlayStitcher, TuneInPocket CastsPodBeanPlayerFM, or THIS URL in your app of choice

 

FROM THIS SHOW

MUSIC

  1. Benedict Cumberbatch, by Nardo Lilly (Folk, Singer-Songwriter)
  2. Lord Pinto, by Caustic Casanova (Hard Rock, Psychedelic Metal)
  3. Carrying Curses, by Spirit Plots (Rock, Garage)
  4. Flying, by Nah (Indie, Psychedelic Rock)
  5. Sometimes Dogs Perceive Other Dogs Differently When They're Wearing Hats, by ShowPony (Indie, Instrumental)

->Follow The Show's Spotify Playlist<-


ANNOUNCEMENTS

DC’s Funk Parade is looking for artists.  Know of one?  Fill this out or send this to your favorite one!
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdVtUrKkbx_BsOzlG8Yi-lxV6Yfkvwk0_-A9O4T7db68q_TnA/viewform

We’re on Google Home!  So cool!  Do you have one of these little speakers?  Try saying this, “Hey google, play the podcast DC Music Rocks on Tunein”  It worked for us!?
Funny P.S. - First thought that came to mind when this worked was to shout “Oh Snap!  DC Music Rocks is IN DA HOUSE!  Literally!”  So clever sometimes...HAHA!

Amazon Alexa owners, we haven’t figured out what the magic words are on there.  Can you try a few?  Please send us a note if you figure out a command that works!  


NEW MUSIC

Our 2018 New Releases by DC Artists’ Spotify Playlist:
https://open.spotify.com/user/dcmusicrocks/playlist/7kbMQzbrQPisoJq5A76V3k


NEW VIDEOS

Area 301 - Product of Hip Hop
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-c1GliCfUqA

Soldiers of Suburbia - Where Do We Go
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4dl_ukSYWi0

Our ‘DC Artists Official Music Videos’ Youtube Playlist:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLtzE3kBQ_70kU0_uB-sdviWajkbzi2Akr


THIS WEEK'S LOCAL DC SHOWS TO SEE

Check the calendar, linked below, for the full list!
http://www.dcmusicrocks.com/local-music-calendar

Jan 12 Fri
Free Lobster Buffet @ Villain & Saint in Bethesda, MD
The Woodshedders @ Gypsy Sally’s in Georgetown

Jan 13 Sat
Elana Los Fulanos & Run Come See @ Pearl Street Warehouse at The Wharf by SW Waterfront
19th St Band @ Hill Country in Chinatown/Archives

Jan 14 Sun
Black Alley @ The Fillmore in Silver Spring, MD
Rare Essence @ The Howard Theatre by Shaw

Jan 16 Tues
Annie Stokes @ Gypsy Sally’s in Georgetown

Jan 18 Thurs
Cassie Urbany @ Jammin Java in Vienna, VA


Patreon

Would you support us?  We'd love to grow and do more!  We're giving away shirts, access to our private facebook group, and more!  We also intend to set aside 10% to contribute directly in the DC Local Music Scene through charities, sponsorships, events, etc.  We want to continue to pay it forward!

HUGE shoutout to our current Patrons! 
--Daniel Warren Hill



Caustic Casanova

VIDEO - BIO - LINKS - TRANSCRIPT

Caustic Casanova's Bio:

Caustic Casanova Pic

Caustic Casanova is a loud, heavy rock band from Washington, DC that has learned the power of constant motion. Since 2013 they’ve practiced and toured tirelessly, showcasing their brands of “absurdly muscled uber-psyche” (Indy Week Raleigh) and “beautiful aural assault” (KnowYourScene) all across North America while releasing new music regularly, with no intention of slowing down.

After forming as teenagers at the College of William and Mary in 2005 and recording several albums and EPs there and in DC, CausticCasanova found itself at a critical juncture in 2012 following the departure of the band’s original guitarist. The rhythm section of drummer/vocalist Stefanie Zaenker and bassist/vocalist Francis Beringer wanted to play even heavier, more experimental music in the vein of Rush and the Melvins, and wanted to tour relentlessly, but weren’t sure if they could find a guitar player who would match their ambition. After a few sets as a bass/drum duo, rounds of guitar player auditions finally yielded the missing element to the new CausticCasanova, longtime fan, friend and all-around six string wizard Andrew Yonki.

In Andrew’s four years with the band, the rejuvenated Caustic Casanova has played hundreds of shows, doing all their own booking in DC and throughout North America, with plans for more touring throughout the world. Even a life-threatening wrist and back injury to drummer Stefanie Zaenker barely curtailed the band’s forward momentum. The CC was back rehearsing less than three months after her second round of surgeries, recorded a 7" (Pantheon: Vol 1) and a full-length (Breaks), and was back on another full US tour within the year.

Since opening for sludge rock titans Kylesa in 2014 and signing to their eclectic label Retro Futurist, Caustic Casanova's relentlessly intense live show has earned plenty of notoriety, and their 2015 LP Breaks has garnered much praise for its uniquely diverse take on heavy.

Caustic Casanova is released their second 7 inch, Pantheon: Vol 2, on September 8th. It features original song “Lord Pinto” and a theremin/guitar/noise freakout cover of the Melvins’ classic “Cow." Catch them on tour in 2018!

“CC...presented a noticeably eccentric set of what could be described as organized chaos, showcased undeniably great musicianship and ripped the stage to shreds.” - Metal Assault (Los Angeles)

“This trio has long been a favorite of mine as they’ve graced many stages in the DC area for several years with their creative, twisted psychedelic metal.” -  DC Rock Live

“I have seen a lot of bands over the years, and I am sure that Caustic Casanova is one of the loudest I have ever witnessed.” - NewsWhistle (Minneapolis)

“For me, the thing that sets CC apart from a lot of heavy rock and metal bands is that their songs are so various — they manage to surprise with different rhythms and textures, avoiding one continuous dark, thrummy sound that blurs from one song to another.Their delivery is pretty flawless — you hear the craft and care that have gone into the songs, which also feature some thoughtful, literate vocals.” - Louisville.com

CC Alec Berry Dino Egg Promo.jpg

INTERVIEW TRANSCRIPT

Brian:    On DC Music Rocks, we're shining a spotlight on the great songs, artists and incredible people behind the DC region's local music scene. Caustic Casanova is a loud, heavy rock band from Washington DC. They formed as teenagers at the College of William and Mary in 2005 and recorded several albums and EPs there and in DC. Since 2013 they've practiced and toured tirelessly, showcasing their talents all across North America while releasing new music regularly, just like the one you just heard. There's no intentions of slowing down either. They've played hundreds of shows and they're doing all their own booking in DC and throughout North America with plans for more touring throughout the world. They released their latest EP, That One, on September 8th, is the exact date.

    I first came across these guys when I was introduced to their music. Somebody said, "Oh, you should check out Caustic Casanova." It was like, "Oh my God, they're so powerful. I love this band." Now I've gotten to play them on the show before and now I actually get to have you guys here, so this is a treat, thanks for being here guys.

Stefanie:    Thank you so much.

Brian:    Now first and foremost, talk about the name. Where does the name Caustic Casanova come from?

Francis:    The name, it just comes from me liking alliteration and wanting to just have ... We wanted to call the band The Casanovas. The real story is we wanted to call the band The Casanovas and there was already some band from Australia or something called that. Then I just looked up another word in the dictionary, Caustic Casanova. It sounds really good. I've had a lot of different stories about it but it just sounds cool. I really like it. I think it stands up to this day. A lot of people regret their band names. I think it's cool. We always get questions about it.

Stefanie:    Many mispronunciations also.

Brian:    Oh, I can only imagine. Somebody's trying to introduce you guys and then-

Andrew:    Misprints as well. We once received a payment in an envelope addressed to "Caustic Casablanca."

Stefanie:    We've also gotten Acoustic Casanova, which is pretty far from the truth.

Brian:    I was going to say, there is nothing acoustic about you guys.

Andrew:    The fact that I used acoustic guitar on one song on an album is still, I cannot fathom it. Cannot believe I let that happen.

Stefanie:    It'll be really cool though.

Francis:    It sounds great.

Brian:    Which song is that, now that you're talking about it?

Andrew:    It's yet to be released.

Brian:    Upcoming. All right.

Andrew:    Upcoming.

Brian:    You know, speaking of that. You talked about these new releases and stuff. Where do they go if they want to follow you guys to find out when that stuff comes out? Where do they go?

Francis:    Facebook.com/CausticCasanova, CausticCasanova.com.

Andrew:    @CausticCasanova on Twitter.

Francis:    And CausticCasanova on Instagram.

Brian:    There it is.

Francis:    We update all of those pretty regularly and ... yeah.

Brian:    What is it that makes you guys special or different, in your opinion.

Stefanie:    I think the style of music that we play is what comes to mind because it's not really categorizable. I don't know. We get everything from heavy metal B-52s to the Breeders to, "You guys sound like Caius." People are always getting different inspirations from our ... from seeing us live or just listening to a recording. That is definitely one thing that makes us unique musically.

Andrew:    We all listen to a lot of different styles and our individual tastes inform a lot how we approach our individual instruments, but I think what really makes us special is that we have a really bizarre and weird sense of humor. We take our music really seriously, but as far as ourselves and our personalities, we don't take it too seriously at all. We like to have pun-offs in the van to see who can make Stefanie groan the loudest with the puns.

Stefanie:    That makes it sound like I'm not involved in these pun-offs. I very much am.

Andrew:    That's because you have the worst.

Brian:    Oh my God, I can only imagine what road trips with you guys are like. That must be amazing.

Andrew:    I've also come up with nicknames for all of us using the Caustic Casanova template. Thank you Stefanie.

Brian:    Oh, this is so good. I love it. What is it now that ... Talk about the DC region connection now. You've always been DC. We said William and Mary's where you got together and then you've been based in DC ever since?

Stefanie:    Francis and I are two of the original members of the band. We formed at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Virginia. Then I was two years younger than him so we took a few years off. Fran is from the area originally, I moved here in 2008 and Andrew moved here in 2004, because he went to American. Since then we've all kind of been in the area.

Brian:    How did you guys get together?

Francis:    The original guitar player and Stefanie and I, I lived in the same hall as the original guitar player in college when I was 17. Then we found Stefanie through an exciting new thing called Facebook, which was very, we just searched for drumming.

Stefanie:    It was the first year that it was around, actually. 2004.

Brian:    That's right, 2004.

Francis:    We found someone through just searching "drumming" and four people came up and we talked to them and she came in and we were so desperate for just anyone that she played a beat for just half a second, we said, "Okay, that's good."

Brian:    Then you found out how absolutely incredible she is.

Francis:    Yeah.

Brian:    It was like your best decision.

Stefanie:    I don't know if I'd say that then. That was a long time ago.

Brian:    But you've come a long way. If you watch videos of these guys, Stefanie puts it down for sure. All these guys put it down, let's be real, but ... wow. Love it.

Francis:    We formed ... I just want to make sure that Andrew gets ...

Brian:    Oh yeah, talk about Andrew. That's right.

Francis:    We sort of disbanded in 2012 for a little bit, mostly because we wanted on tour a lot and it just wasn't possible with the situation we were in in 2012. Our guitar player left the band and then we decided we were going to continue, but only if we could get someone who was really, really, really good. We tried out a lot of people and it just turned out that our really good friend, who had mostly played in punk bands that we knew, had a lot more to offer as far as space rock and all sorts of things. We ended up asking him and it's been a joy ever since. Take it away, Andrew.

Brian:    Andrew, I love that, man.

Andrew:    In case you couldn't figure it out, I was the really good friend that they were talking about.

Brian:    I started to wonder for a second, but then I realized, no there can't be another plot twist here. That must be you he's talking about.

Andrew:    They were hoping to get their really good friend in the band but they wound up with me instead. This is what it's like, this is what it's like in the van.

Brian:    I'm getting more ... I was going to say. I'm imaging what it's like in the van. This is so good.

Stefanie:    But it's also a lot smellier.

Francis:    I knew she wouldn't be able to hold back from getting that in.

Brian:    Oh, [crosstalk 00:07:32]. We don't have to ... We don't have to go down that road.

Stefanie:    We don't have to go there.

Francis:    Don't go blue. This is a family show.

Brian:    Well, hold on.

Francis:    Keep it clean.

Brian:    On that then, we'll talk about you guys outside of the music then. On the personal side, hobbies, or what do you do in your free time. Talk about that. Each of you.

Stefanie:    Well, I really like to spend time outside. Francis always makes fun of me because I use, "I was an outside kid," as an excuse for why I don't know a lot ...

Francis:    Know what the Cloud is.

Stefanie:    ... of popular culture or that I didn't really understand what the Cloud was, yes I'll say it. A couple years ago I was like, "What is it? Is it a physical cloud?" Anyway, I won't go there. I really like cycling, I like running, I like staying active, basically doing anything outside. I like trying new food, new beer. I really like sour beer and I like attending shows. Those are some of my favorite things to do.

Brian:    Nice. Francis, what about you, man?

Francis:    I like to do all of those things. The amount of time that the three of us spend together is pretty ridiculous since it seems like we do everything together both in and out of the band. We all pretty much do a lot of the same things. We all love food. That's part of what we love about touring is finding new restaurants and new beers and new cocktails and different things in different cities.

     I personally, just the only thing that Stef didn't mention, I love reading books. I tried to read 40 books last year.

Brian:    How'd you do?

Francis:    I failed, but ...

Brian:    How many did you do?

Francis:    Fewer than 30. A real 700 page doorstop about North Korea really hung me up. That was the one that killed me. More light reading for 2018.

Brian:    A doorstop about North Korea. God, that's such a current event thing too, I love it. Andrew, what about you, man?

Andrew:    Well, I mentioned earlier, I live in Frederick so my girlfriend and I, we spend a lot of time just wandering around downtown Frederick. We like to try the restaurants there and a lot of really good breweries up there that we like to sample and some really good hiking. We love cooking and I love to see what fun stuff I can do with my cast iron pan. There's some deliciousness.

Brian:    You mentioned breweries, just out of curiosity, is there one that comes to mind as like the latest one you tried recently that was, "Oh God, that was such a good brewery?" You like that one?

Andrew:    My favorite brewery up in Frederick is Attaboy. It started out as just a brewery where you could do growler fills on the weekends and now they're starting to distribute on draft lines in Frederick. It's still a really small operation and they make really, really delicious beers. The brewery space is super nice. It's a great way to spend an afternoon, get something from the food truck and play giant Jenga.

Brian:    Nice. That's cool. All right now, back to you guys as a band, one of the things I'm curious about, because you've been at this for lot of years, what's the biggest success moment that comes to mind for you guys so far?

Stefanie:    I guess that means there have been none. Just kidding.

Brian:    There's so many.

Stefanie:    I think ... I'll keep it short but I'll speak for all three of us when I say, getting signed to Retro Futurist Records, the label that Kylesa, the psychedelic metal band owns was a highlight. We played with them once in 2012 or something like that.

Andrew:    2013.

Stefanie:    They really liked us and they asked, "Do you guys have anyone to release your upcoming record?" We didn't and then we kind of just kept talking with them and that's how we got signed to the label and that's the first label that we had ever been on. Yeah, I think all three of us were pretty floored by that.

Francis:    That was going to be my choice, to get to open for one of your heroes and then for them, based on a 25 minute performance, to come up to you and say, "We'd love to release your record and to be associated with you," and how great we were. That's something I'll never forget for the rest of my life. That was pretty awesome.

Brian:    That's amazing. One more, now this one's for each of you. One of my favorite questions to ask is, if you could offer one piece of advice, what would it be? Andrew, start with you, man.

Andrew:    Well my one piece of advice would be, if you want to play music just get whatever instrument it is that you want to learn how to play and start making noise with it. Don't wait for somebody to teach you what you're doing, just start making noise and when something you do sounds good to you, do it again and keep building off of that. Don't wait for anyone.

Brian:    That's awesome. I like that one. What about you, Francis?

Francis:    This is something that I would say is advice maybe for younger musicians or people in the area, this is just basically aimed at musicians, but one is you do not ... It is absolutely wrong that you need to have a local following to tour. If you want to tour and you think your band is good, you should just start doing it right way, as soon as possible. A lot of the success that happened to our band would never have happened if we had abided by the very wrong rule that you need to have built up a local following before you tour. We built up a local following by touring, by impressing people that we had been on tour, that wanted to see us when we came back here.

Brian:    Nice.

Francis:    Secondly is that when you are trying to become a musician, you're trying to write, you're trying to get really good, listening to as much music as humanly possible is just as important as playing and different kinds of things and getting exposed to stuff outside your comfort zone is what will make you good, as much as practicing.

Brian:    I love it and you get a pass, because I asked for one piece of advice and that was two.

Francis:    Sorry.

Brian:    I love how, you're such an overachiever, I love it, man. Francis is good. Stefanie, talk to us, what do you got?

Stefanie:    If you're a band that's preparing to go into the studio, I would say practice ... you know, for the first time or the second time, if you haven't done this before, practice your songs to a metronome during your practice, if there are parts that you can do that to. We didn't do that the first few times that we went into the studio and now we're in the habit of doing that and it just makes things so much easier for us and for the engineer, for the producer, both parties are just way happier. It creates a better product, it's more fun and, yeah. Definitely, it might be hard at first, but you'll get used to it and it definitely helps a lot in the studio.

Brian:    Practice with a metronome. I love it guys. One more time, if they want to follow you guys and find out more about what's happening with Caustic Casanova, where do they go?

Andrew:    Facebook.com/CausticCasanova, @CausticCasanova on Twitter, CausticCasanova on Instagram, CausticCasanova.com, oh and by the way, no spaces in between Caustic and Casanova on Instagram.